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Going to the Show: Lesson Plans

Exploring the early North Carolina moving picture theater experience in the early 1900s through the Bijou Theatre, Wilmington, North Carolina's first moving picture theater


Introduction  |   Day 1  |   Day 2  |   Day 3  |   Day 4  |   Final Project  |   Learn More


Final Project

The teacher can choose to allow students to complete this project individually or in groups.

Options:
1a. The assignment is for the student to build some sort of project that compares and contrasts the Bijou moviegoing experience between 1906 and 1912+. The teacher can make this as free-form as they prefer, allowing students to prepare whatever type of representation they want, or the teacher can constrain the project and ask students to do something like a two-column compare/contrast, a timeline, annotated photographs or articles. The teacher could constrain the project to something like a top-5 or top-10 list. Encourage students to identify / differentiate / distinguish between aspects that are explicitly presented from the sources from inferences or conclusions that they are drawing from the available materials. You may want to encourage students to visit the Wilmington page of the Going to the Show website if they are interested in exploring more news clippings or advertisements on their own (http://docsouth.unc.edu/gtts/map/?city=wilmington ).

1b. The assignment is for students to compare / contrast moviegoing at the Bijou Theatre in the early 1900s with moviegoing today. What aspects of the original Bijou Theatre are still around in today's moviegoing experience? What aspects of the renovated Bijou Theatre are still around in today's moviegoing experience?

2. The student is to prepare a brief (1-3 minute) presentation that summarizes the most significant similarity and the most significant difference, and why this is significant to him / her.

ASSESSMENT
Assessment will be based on the student's body of work throughout the lesson. Teachers can determine how much weight each part of the lesson and what specific rubric to use based on their own teaching / learning priorities and classroom practices. The following questions will help you think about how to assess a student's work for various parts of the lesson:

Discussions & Classroom Activities:

Image Analysis Worksheets:

Freewriting:
Freewriting shouldn't be graded on grammar, spelling, organization or content - rather students should be evaluated on whether they seem to have engaged with the task at hand and tried to use the time to productively generate and record their ideas in written form.

Final Project:

Introduction  |   Day 1  |   Day 2  |   Day 3  |   Day 4  |   Final Project  |   Learn More