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Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
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  • Monument Name

    Confederate Monument, State Capitol, Raleigh

  • Type

    Common Soldier Statue

  • Subjects

    Civil War

  • Creator

    Leopold Von Miller II, Sculptor

    Muldoon Monument Company, Builder

  • City

    Raleigh

  • County

    Wake

  • Description

    This 75-foot-tall monument to fallen Confederate soldiers is located on the State Capitol grounds. At the top of the column is a statue depicting a Confederate artillery soldier holding a gun. Near the bottom of the column are two statues, one representing the Confederate infantry and the other a Confederate cavalryman. Two 32 pounder naval cannons stand on each side of the monument.

    In 1892, state legislators endorsed the goal of building a Confederate monument in Capital Square. Secretary of State Octavius Coke held a meeting of members of both the Ladies Memorial Association and the North Carolina Monumental Association in June 1892 to launch a campaign to erect a memorial to deceased Confederate soldiers from North Carolina.

    Images: Contemporary view | Rear view | Front inscription | Back inscription | Cavalryman | Infantryman | Right cannon | Left cannon | Plaques on naval cannons

  • Inscription

    Front, on shaft: TO OUR / CONFEDERATE / DEAD

    Rear, on base: FIRST AT / BETHEL / LAST AT / APPOMATTOX / 1861. 1865.

    Plaques on naval cannons: 32 Pounder Naval Cannon / TAKEN IN JUNE 1861 WHEN THE NAVY YARD AT / NORFOLK WAS ABANDONED BY THE UNITED STATES / BANDED AND CONVERTED / AT RICHMOND INTO A 6 INCH RIFLE / MOUNTED AT FORT CASWELL, NORTH CAROLINA / DISMOUNTED BY EXPLODING MAGAZINES / WHEN THE CONFEDERATES EVACUATED THAT FORT / IN JANUARY 1865 / PRESENTED BY US WAR DEPARTMENT / 1902

  • Custodian

    State of North Carolina

  • Dedication Date

    May 20, 1895

  • Decade

    1890s

  • Geographic Coordinates

    35.780430 , -78.640050 View in Geobrowsemap pin

  • Supporting Sources

      "A Historical Day," The News and Observer (Raleigh, NC), May 22, 1894

      "A Memorial Day," The News and Observer (Raleigh, NC), May 23, 1894

      "An Interview with Col. Kenan and Col. Tate," The News and Observer Chronicle (Raleigh, NC), February 3, 1894, 1-2 Link

      "Confederate Monument and Olivia Raney Library, Raleigh, N.C.," in Durwood Barbour Collection of North Carolina Postcards (P077), North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives, Wilson Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, (accessed March 15, 2012) Link

      "Confederate Monument and State Capitol, Raleigh, N.C.," in Durwood Barbour Collection of North Carolina Postcards (P077), North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives, Wilson Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, (accessed December 29, 2011) Link

      "Confederate Monument in Raleigh, N.C.,” in Durwood Barbour Collection of North Carolina Postcards (P077), North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives, Wilson Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, (accessed December 29, 2011) Link

      "Confederate Monument, Capital Grounds, Raleigh, N.C.," in Durwood Barbour Collection of North Carolina Postcards (P077), North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives, Wilson Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, (accessed December 29, 2011) Link

      "Confederate Soldiers Monument," North Carolina Civil War Monuments, (accessed January 28, 2011) Link

      "Final Arrangement," The News and Observer Chronicle (Raleigh, NC), May 20, 1894, 1-2 Link

      "North Carolina's Soldier and the Banquet to the Men Who Put Him There," The News and Observer (Raleigh, NC), April 10, 1895, 5 Link

      "Official Programme," The News and Observer (Raleigh, NC), May 19, 1895, 2 Link

      "State House and Confederate Monument," in Durwood Barbour Collection of North Carolina Postcards (P077), North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives, Wilson Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, (accessed December 29, 2011) Link

      "Tear Down This Monument?," New Raleigh, February 25, 2009, (accessed December 29, 2011) Link

      Confederate Veteran, 6 (1898), 229 Link

      History of the Ladies Memorial Association, (Raleigh, NC: 1938), (accessed May 16, 2012) Link

      Berent, Irwin M. The Monuments and Statues on the Capitol Square of North Carolina, (Greenville, NC: East Carolina University Press, 1985)

      Bishir, Catherine W. "Landmarks of Power," in Where These Memories Grow: History, Memory, and Southern Identity, edited by W. Fitzhugh Brundage, (Chapel Hill, NC: The University of North Carolina Press, 2000), 150-151

      Bishir, Catherine W. "North Carolina’s Union Square," Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina, (accessed May 15, 2012) Link

      Carlisle, Linda A. "North Carolina State Capitol Memorial Study Committee Report," North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources, May 2010, (accessed January 31, 2011) Link

      Clark, Walter. "How Can Interest Be Aroused in the Study of the History of North Carolina?" (Wrightsville, NC: Teachers' Assembly, 1901), (accessed May 29, 2012) Link

      Grimes, J. Bryan. "Why North Carolina Should Erect and Preserve Memorials and Mark Historic Places: Address Before the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association, Raleigh, N.C., November 4, 1909," ([Raleigh, NC: The News and Observer, 1909]), (accessed May 18, 2012) Link

      Mason, Thomas W. Address of Hon. T.W. Mason Before the Ladies' Memorial Association at the Laying of the Corner-Stone of the Confederate Monument, Raleigh, NC, May 20, 1895, (Raleigh: E.M. Uzzell, 1898), (accessed February 8, 2012) Link

      Waddell, Alfred M. Address at the Unveiling of the Confederate Monument, at Raleigh, N.C., May 20th, 1895, (Wilmington, NC: LeGwin Bros., 1895), (accessed February 8, 2012) Link

      Waymarking.com. "North Carolina State Confederate Monument," (accessed December 29, 2011) Link

      Williams, Charlotte Bryan Grimes. History of the Wake County Ladies Memorial Association: Confederate Memorials in Capitol Square, Memorial Pavilion, the House of Memory and Confederate Cemetery, (Raleigh, NC: United Daughters of the Confederacy, Johnston Pettigrew Chapter No. 95, 1938), (accessed May 16, 2012) Link

      “Capitol Building,” in the North Carolina County Photographic Collection #P0001, North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Link

  • Public Site

    Yes

  • Materials & Techniques

    Mt. Airy Granite, bronze statues

  • Sponsors

    State of North Carolina

  • Monument Cost

    $22,000

  • Monument Dedication and Unveiling

    Dedicated on May 20, 1895. Unveiled by Julia Jackson Christian, Granddaughter of Stonewall Jackson. Speakers included Captain Samuel Ashe, Thomas W. Mason, and Alfred Waddell.

  • Subject Notes

    The initial model for the statues was to be the Confederate hero Henry L. Wyatt, but the sculptor Von Miller used W. R. Dicks (who was a living Confederate veteran) as inspiration for the statues.

  • Controversies

    When the monument was first proposed, Populist and Republican legislators objected to any public funding of the monument on the grounds that public education, rather than sectional pride, was a pressing need. In addition, monument opponents protested against the special tax fund that would be used to subsidize the monument’s costs.

    During the 2000s, some critics questioned whether it was appropriate to continue to commemorate, on capitol grounds, white soldiers who fought to establish a slaveholders’ republic.

  • Location

    This monument faces Hillsborough Street and is parallel to South Salisbury Street. It is surrounded by trees and a paved pathway. Directly behind the monument is the State Capitol building.

  • Landscape

    The monument is located at the end of Hillsborough Street on the west side of the capitol grounds.

  • Post Dedication Use

    The Civil Works Authority made plans to move the monument from Capital Square to Nash Square in 1934 as part of renovations to Capital Square, but the Board of Public Buildings and Grounds decided on February 5th to prevent the CWA from moving the monument. The move was prevented because of public outcry in regards to moving such a historically significant monument from a highly visible location.

  • Approval Process

    In 1893 the legislature appropriated $10,000 to build the monument in honor of deceased Confederate soldiers in Capital Square. An alliance of Republican and Populist legislators stalled approval of subsequent funding until March 7, 1895, when both chambers of the legislature voted in favor of an additional appropriation of $10,000.

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