Documenting the American South

Doc South header logo Home
Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
Commemorative Landscapes banner
  • Monument Name

    Confederate Monument, Pittsboro

  • Type

    Common Soldier Statue

  • Subjects

    Civil War

  • Creator

    C. J Harlin, Durham (N.C.) Marble Works, Supplier

  • City

    Pittsboro

  • County

    Chatham

  • Description

    A bronze statue of a Confederate soldier stands erect atop a marble pedestal. He is clad in a Confederate uniform, complete with hat, and holds his rifle in front of him, its butt rusting on the ground. The monument stands 27 feet tall.

  • Inscription

    Front: TO THE CONFEDERATE SOLDIERS OF CHATHAM COUNTY / OUR CONFEDERATE HEROES

    Side: THIS MONUMENT IS THE GIFT OF THOSE WHO / RESERVE THE MEMORY OF THE CONFEDERATE / SOLDIER. ERECTED UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE WINNIE / DAVIS CHAPTER OF THE DAUGHTERS OF THE / CONFEDERACY. MRS. H.A. LONDON / PRESIDENT / AUG. 23 1907.

    Rear: CHATHAM FURNISHED 1900 / SOLDIERS TO THE CONFEDERACY / ABOUT 14-50 ENLISTED IN THE FOLL- / OWING COMPANIES ORGANIZED IN THIS / COUNTY / CO. I-32 REGIMENT / E 26 / G 26 / D 35 / E 44 / G 48 / D 61 / E 63 / G 63 / H 70 D 49 / ABOUT 450 SONS OF THE CHATHAM ENLISTED IN COMPANIES / ORGANIZED IN OTHER COUNTIES.

  • Custodian

    Chatham County

  • Dedication Date

    August 23, 1907

  • Decade

    1900s

  • Geographic Coordinates

    35.720510 , -79.177160 View in Geobrowsemap pin

  • Supporting Sources

      "[Old Court House, Chatham County]," in Durwood Barbour Collection of North Carolina Postcards (P077), North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, (accessed May 14, 2013) Link

      Confederate Veteran 15 (1907), 504 Link

      Confederate Veteran, 17 (1909), p. 507. Link

      United Daughters of the Confederacy, North Carolina Division. Minutes of the Tenth Annual Convention of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, North Carolina Division, Held at Durham, N.C., October 10th, 11th and 12th 1906, (Newton, NC: Enterprise Job Print., 1907), 70-71, (accessed August 29, 2012) Link

      United Daughters of the Confederacy, North Carolina Division. Minutes of the Twenty-Fifth Annual Convention of the United Daughters of the Confederacy North Carolina Division, Held at Winston-Salem, North Carolina, October 25, 26, 27, 1921 (Gastonia, N.C.: Brumley-Walters Printing Co.), 147, (accessed September 15, 2012) Link

      United Daughters of the Confederacy, North Carolina Division. Minutes of the Twenty-Fifth Annual Convention of the United Daughters of the Confederacy North Carolina Division, Held at Winston-Salem, North Carolina, October 25, 26, 27, 1921 (Gastonia, N.C.: Brumley-Walters Printing Co., 1922), 145, (accessed September 15, 2012) Link

      United Daughters of the Confederacy, North Carolina Division. Minutes of the Twenty-Sixth Annual Convention of the United Daughters of the Confederacy North Carolina Division, Held at Wilmington, North Carolina, October 10, 11, 12, 13, 1922 Silver Anniversary (Raleigh, N.C.: Edwards & Broughton Printing Company, 1923), 141, (accessed September 15, 2012) Link

      Waymarking.com. "Chatham County Confederate Monument," (accessed February 4, 2011) Link

  • Public Site

    Yes

  • Materials & Techniques

    Mount Airy Granite

  • Sponsors

    Winnie Davis Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy

  • Monument Dedication and Unveiling

    North Carolina Supreme Court Chief Justice Walter Clark was the orator and was introduced by Mr. Henry London. The statue was presented by Mrs. H. A. London and received by Lieutenant O. A. Hanner. Colonel John R. Lane served as Chief Marshall for the occasion.

  • Controversies

    Some people in Chatham want the monument removed from the courthouse, or destroyed. They contend it promotes racism and commemorates the slave-holding South. Others defend it as a reminder of historical events and of local heritage.

  • Location

    The monument stands directly in front of the Chatham Country Courthouse steps.

  • Post Dedication Use

    Children make a game of tossing bottle caps from the balcony of the courthouse and seeing if they can get them to stay on the soldier’s hat.

  • Approval Process

    Mrs. Henry A. London wrote 1600 letters during a 3 ½ year period campaigning to get the statue.

Know anything else about this monument that isn't mentioned here? If you have additional information on this or any other monument in our collection fill out the form at the Contact Us link in the footer. Thank you.