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Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
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  • Monument Name

    Edgecombe County Confederate Monument, Tarboro

  • Type

    Common Soldier Statue

  • Subjects

    Civil War, 1861-1865

  • Creator

    American Bronze Foundry, Chicago, IL, Foundry

    Cockade Marble Works, Petersburg, VA, Builder

  • City

    Tarboro

  • County

    Edgecombe

  • Description

    The monument consists of a tall granite column standing on a pedestal. At the top of the column stands a bronze statue of a Confederate soldier, who wears a hat and rests both his hands on his rifle. The rifle's stock is planted on the ground in front of the soldier. At the base of the monument are symbols of the Confederacy, including the rebel flag inside a cross and the seal of the Confederate States of America.

  • Inscription

    Front: ERECTED IN HONOR OF / THE CONFEDERATE SOLDIERS / OF / EDGECOMBE COUNTY / ‘DEFENDERS OF STATE SOVEREIGNTY.’ 1861 C.S.A. 1865

    Rear: ERECTED OCT. 29, 1904

  • Dedication Date

    October 29, 1904

  • Decade

    1900s

  • Geographic Coordinates

    35.900440 , -77.535970 View in Geobrowsemap pin

  • Supporting Sources

      "Town Common and Confederate Monument, Tarboro, N.C." in North Carolina Postcard Collection (P052), North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives, Wilson Library, UNC-Chapel Hill Link

      "Town Commons Showing Confederate Monument, Tarboro, N.C.," in Durwood Barbour Collection of North Carolina Postcards (P077), North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives, Wilson Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, (accessed December 10, 2012) Link

      Confederate Veteran 19 (1911), 102 Link

      Butler, Douglas J. North Carolina Civil War Monuments, An Illustrated History, (Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, Inc., 2013), 80-84

      Hardy, Charles C. Images of America: Remembering North Carolina’s Confederates, (Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing, 2006), (accessed February 8, 2012) Link

      Smith, Blanche Lucas. North Carolina's Confederate Monuments and Memorials, (Raleigh, NC: North Carolina Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, 1941)

      “Edgecombe County Confederate Memorial,” The Historical Marker Database, HMdb.org, (accessed September 11, 2017) Link

      “Edgecombe County Confederate Memorial,” The Historical Marker Database, HMdb.org, (accessed January 26, 2012) Link

      “Monument Unveiling Programme,” The Tarborough Southerner, October 27, 1904 Link

      “Monument Unveiling,” The Tarborough Southerner, November 3, 1904 Link

  • Public Site

    Yes

  • Materials & Techniques

    Polished gray granite base and column, bronze statue.

  • Sponsors

    The Daughters of the Confederacy - William Dorsey Prender Chapter

  • Monument Cost

    $2,250

  • Monument Dedication and Unveiling

    Two children, Katherine Wimberly Bourne and William Dorsey Pender, Jr. unveiled the monument. Bourne was a granddaughter of Civil War Governor, Henry T. Clark and Pender was the grandson of Confederate General William Dorsey Pender. When unveiled three shots were fired by the Edgecombe Guards as the band played “Praise God from Whom All Blessings Flow.” Julian S. Carr delivered the day’s featured oration. Although in attendance Governor Charles B. Aycock was not on the program. After the speeches and benediction “Dixie” was played to end the ceremony.

  • Subject Notes

    The dedication was held without the statue present. It did not arrive from the foundry in Chicago until the following week.

  • Location

    The monument is on North Main Street (U.S. 64), on the right when traveling north, Tarboro, NC 27886. It is located in the town common that was established in 1760 by the legislative act which crated the colonial town of Tarboro. Several other memorials are located nearby, including USS Maine Memorial and Henry Lawson Wyatt Memorial Fountain.

  • Landscape

    The memorial stands in a large park, Tarboro’s Town Common that is one of two remaining original town commons in the United States, the other one being in Boston.

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