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Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
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  • Monument Name

    Monument to Major General Stephen Dodson Ramseur, Lincolnton

  • Type

    Obelisk

  • Subjects

    Historic Military Figures

    Civil War, 1861-1865

  • Creator

    Wiley Brothers, Foundry

    James Tiddy, The Charlotte Marble Yard, Sculptor

  • City

    Lincolnton

  • County

    Lincoln

  • Description

    The monument to Major General Stephen Dodson Ramseu consists of an obelisk shaped shaft resting atop square base elements. The obelisk is thirteen and a half inches square at its largest. The base element with inscriptions is seventeen and one half inches square and two feet tall. Total height is approximately eight feet. In front of the monument is a marble marker noting that the original of this monument was destroyed by Hurricane Hugo in 1989. The monument was re-dedicated in June 1991. The monument and grave site is surrounded by a cast iron fence made up of vertical cutwork panels below a frieze of quatrefoils. Ramseur was buried at this location in 1864 and the monument was placed in 1870.

    Images: Re-dedication plaque | Cemetery view

  • Inscription

    Front, obelisk: MALVERN HILL / SEVEN PINES / CHANCELLORSVILLE / GETTYSBURG / MINE RUN / WILDERNESS / SPOTSYLVANIA / RICHMOND / LYNCHBURH / KEARNSTOWN / WINCHESTER / CEDAR RUN

    Front, base: MAJOR GENERAL / STEPHEN DOBSON / RAMSEUR / BORN / MAY 31ST, 1837 / MORTALLY WOUNDED AT THE / BATTLE OF CEDAR CREEK / ON THE 19TH AND / DIED / ON THE 20TH OCTOBER, 1964

    Rear, base: “A GOOD SOLDIER OF / JESUS CHRIST”

    Marker, front: ORIGINAL RAMSEUR MONUMENT / DESTROYED BY HURRICANE HUGO / SEPT. 22, 1989 / PRESENT MONUMENT DEDICATED / JUNE 1, 1991

  • Custodian

    St. Luke Episcopal Church

  • Dedication Date

    1870. Re-dedicated in June 1991.

  • Decade

    1870s

  • Geographic Coordinates

    35.474260 , -81.253180 View in Geobrowsemap pin

  • Supporting Sources

      "Gen Stephen Dodson Ramseur." Find a Grave, http://www.findagrave.com/, (accessed August 18, 2015) Link

      Cox, William R. "Address on the Life and Character of Maj. Gen. Stephen D. Ramseur: Before the Ladies Memorial Association of Raleigh, N.C., May 10th, 1891. (Raleigh, NC: E. M. Uzzell, Printer, 1891), (accessed May 18, 2012) Link

      Dr. Kickler, Troy L. "Stephen Dodson Ramseur (1837 - 1864)," in "North Carolina History Project," www.northcarolinahistory.org, (accessed August 18, 2015) Link

      Leutze, James R. “Schenck, David,” NCPedia, (accessed June 26, 2015) Link

      National Park Services. U.S. Department of the Interior. “The Lost Generation-The Tragic Deaths of Ramseur and Lowell,” (accessed August 18, 2015) Link

      National Park Services. United States Department Of The Interior. “St. Luke’s Church And Cemetery,” in National Register Of Historical Places, section 8, page 19, (accessed August 8, 2015) Link

  • Public Site

    Yes

  • Materials & Techniques

    White marble

  • Sponsors

    David Schenck

  • Subject Notes

    Major General Stephen Dodson Ramseur (1837-1864) was one of two Confederate Major Generals to be born in Lincolnton, the other being Robert Frederick Hoke. A graduate of West Point in 1860, Ramseur joined the Confederate army in 1861; he was mortally wounded at Cedar Creek and died on 19 October 1864.

    David Schenck who funded the original monument was General Ramseur’s brother-in-law. He was a prominent Reconstruction era lawyer, judge, politician and historian. One of his most significant late life accomplishments was the Guilford Battle Ground. It was largely through his efforts that interest and money was raised to save this important Revolutionary War battle site.

    James Tiddy, The Charlotte Marble Yard created the original 1870 monument. Wiley Brothers created the 1991 replica.

  • Location

    The monument is located in the graveyard of St. Luke Episcopal Church facing north-northeast. The church address is 315 N. Cedar St., Lincolnton. The St. Luke Episcopal Church and graveyard are listed on the National Register of Historic

  • Landscape

    The obelisk stands on the Jacob A. Ramseur (Major General's father) family plot surrounded by an iron fence.

  • Death Space

    Yes

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