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Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
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  • Monument Name

    Iredell County Confederate Memorial, Statesville

  • Type

    Common Soldier Statue

  • Subjects

    Civil War, 1861-1865

  • Creator

    Carolina Marble and Granite, Statesville, NC, Supplier

  • City

    Statesville

  • County

    Iredell

  • Description

    The monument is surmounted by a Confederate soldier, private in rank, at parade rest with musket in hand. The monument consists of a triple base, die stone and cap, a tapered spire with cap and the statue on top. The total height is 27 feet including the statue at 6 feet 6 inches tall. Two cannons, originally loaned by the U.S. Government, mounted on steel casings and granite bases, flank the monument pointing northeast and southeast.

    Images: Front inscriptions | Left side inscription | Right side inscription | Cannons | Re-dedication plaque | Far-off view | The Iredell County Confederate Memorial and United Spanish War Veterans Memorial

  • Inscription

    Front: TO THE SOLDIERS OF / IREDELL COUNTY / 1861. - 1865. / 1905

    Right side: THEY BORE THE FLAG OF A / NATION'S TRUST / AND FELL IN A CAUSE, / THOUGHT LOST, STILL JUST, / AND DIED FOR ME AND YOU

    Left side: DEFENDERS OF / STATE SOVEREIGNTY

    Rear: FROM BETHEL TO APPOMATOX, / THEIR COURAGE, PATIENCE, / FORTITUDE, ENDURANCE, AND / UNSELFISH DEVOTION TO / COUNTRY ARE UNPARALLELED / IN HISTORY. Base: OUR CONFEDERATE DEAD

    Re-dedication plaque: CENTENNIAL AND REDEDICATION OF / MONUMENT IN MEMORY OF THE / IREDELL CO. CONFEDERATE SOLDIERS / MAY 6, 2006 – DEO VINDICE

  • Dedication Date

    May 10, 1906

  • Decade

    1900s

  • Geographic Coordinates

    35.783810 , -80.887920 View in Geobrowsemap pin

  • Supporting Sources

      "Iredell County Confederate Memorial," The Historical Marker Database, HMdb.org, (accessed May 23, 2012) Link

      "Iredell County Court House, Statesville, N.C." in Durwood Barbour Collection of North Carolina Postcards (P077), North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives, Wilson Library, UNC-Chapel Hill Link

      "Iredell County Court House, Statesville, N.C." in Durwood Barbour Collection of North Carolina Postcards (P077), North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives, Wilson Library, UNC-Chapel Hill Link

      "The Unveiling Next Thursday,” Statesville Record and Landmark (Statesville, NC), May 4, 1906

      Butler, Douglas J. North Carolina Civil War Monuments, An Illustrated History (Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, Inc., 2013)

      Dandron, Jennifer. “Iredell Officials: Confederate Monument in Downtown Statesville Preserves History,” Statesville Record and Landmark (Statesville, NC), August 20, 2017, (accessed August 26, 2017) Link

      Iredell County [North Carolina]. "Iredell County Board of Commissioners Regular Minutes March 14, 2006"

      North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources. "Iredell County," North Carolina Civil War Monuments, (accessed February 8, 2013) Link

      United Daughters of the Confederacy, North Carolina Division. Minutes of the Tenth Annual Convention of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, North Carolina Division, Held at Durham, N.C., October 10th, 11th and 12th 1906, (Newton, NC: Enterprise Job Print., 1907), 71, (accessed May 23, 2012) Link

      United Daughters of the Confederacy, North Carolina Division. Minutes of the Third Annual Meeting of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, North Carolina Division Held in Henderson, N.C., October 11-12, 1899 (Raleigh, N.C.: Capital Printing Company, Printers and Binders, 1900), 63, (accessed September 12, 2012) Link

      “Confederate Monument,” Statesville Record and Landmark (Statesville, NC), December 29, 1905

      “Gov. Glenn at Statesville,” The Farmer and Mechanic (Raleigh, NC), May 15, 1906

      “Our Confederate Dead Memorial – Statesville, NC,” Waymarking.com, (accessed February 8, 2013) Link

      “The Confederate Monument,” Statesville Record and Landmark (Statesville, NC), May 16, 1905

      “The Guns Mounted,” Statesville Record and Landmark (Statesville, NC), April 24, 1906

      “The Unveiling Yesterday,” Statesville Record and Landmark (Statesville, NC), May 11, 1906

  • Public Site

    Yes

  • Materials & Techniques

    Statue and shaft: Vermont Barre granite. Base: Rowan County granite. Cannon bases: Steel and granite

  • Sponsors

    United Daughters of the Confederacy, Statesville Chapter

  • Monument Cost

    $1,850

  • Monument Dedication and Unveiling

    The statue had been placed atop the base a few days before Christmas in 1905 but the dedication was deferred until Confederate Memorial Day, May 10, 1906. The ceremony was conducted inside a packed courthouse, moved inside due to a threat of poor weather. Rev. C.M. Richards opened with prayer before Judge W.D. Turner introduced Governor Robert B. Glenn, orator for the day. During Turner’s introduction, he “insisted the cause for which they [the South] fought was not lost,” while Governor Glenn noted that North Carolina was against secession at the beginning of the war but shots fired at Ft. Sumter left it no choice. At the conclusion of Glenn’s speech, the band played Dixie and the governor joined in as the Confederate veterans gave the “rebel yell.” After Glenn’s speech L.C. Caldwell accepted the monument on behalf of the county. Moving outside, eight children performed the unveiling: Essie Cowles, Annie Belle Walton, Sarah Adams, Mary Colvert, Beth Evans, Rachael Gill, Katie Reid Wycoff and Willie Jenkins. Music was provided by the Forest Hill Band of Concord. After the ceremony, a procession led by the speakers and Confederate Veterans marched to the Presbyterian cemetery to decorate Confederate graves and then to the opera house for a dinner honoring the veterans.

  • Subject Notes

    According to the United Daughters of the Confederacy, twenty-eight soldiers who died during the war were buried in Statesville. In 2006, a Mr. Stan Clardy approached the Iredell County Commissioners with a request to place a re-dedication marker at the base of the monument as part of the celebration of its 100th anniversary in May of that year. The planned wording would be "Centennial and Rededication of Monument - In memory of the Iredell County Confederate Soldiers, May 6, 2006, Deo Vindice." The cost would be covered by private donations and sales of advertisements and commemorative items. The board approved the request, 5 votes to 0.

    The statue was carved in Vermont.

  • Controversies

    Across the United States there have been calls for removal of Confederate memorials after the death of a counter-protester, Heather Heyer, at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia on August 14, 2017 and after President Donald Trump expressed his opposition to the removal of Confederate memorials. In North Carolina the removal became unlawful after the legislature passed a law in 2015 protecting “objects of remembrance.” Despite Governor Roy Cooper's calling for a repeal of this law and the removal of all such memorials on public property, Iredell County officials seemed to oppose removal of their memorial.

  • Location

    The monument stands in front of the historic Iredell County Courthouse at Court Street and South Center Street in Statesville, NC. The United Spanish War Veterans Memorial stands on the south lawn. A flag pole with a granite and bronze marker to War Mothers of Iredell County stands near the sidewalk in front of the Confederate Monument.

  • Landscape

    The monument stands on the front lawn of the courthouse. It is flanked by two cannons facing away from the courthouse. Mature trees surround the site.

  • Post Dedication Use

    The Sons of Confederate Veterans hold Confederate Memorial Day services in May each year on the old courthouse grounds.

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