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Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
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  • Monument Name

    Chowan County Confederate Soldiers Monument, Edenton

  • Type

    Common Soldier Statue

  • Subjects

    Civil War

  • City

    Edenton

  • County

    Chowan

  • Description

    This monument was built to honor the Confederate dead of Chowan County. The structure consists of a tall white granite shaft with a Confederate Common Soldier standing with his rifle at his waist and pointing forward. He looks ahead with a fixed and resolute stare. There are inscriptions on both the front and the back of the monument, with the dates for the Confederacy on the front and a poem honoring the dead on the back. The granite shaft is nineteen feet tall, with a bas-relief image of the Confederate flag unfurled on its pole, and the bronze figure is seven feet high.

    Images:
    Postcard image with street view | Postcard image with view of Edenton Bay | Postcard image facing the historic courthouse | Postcard image showing the base of the monument prior to installation of the statue

  • Inscription

    Front: OUR CONFEDERATE DEAD / 1861-1865

    Rear: Gashed with honorable scars, / Low in Glorys lap they lie, / Though they fell, they fell like stars, / Streaming splendour through the sky.

  • Custodian

    Bell Battery Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy

  • Dedication Date

    The cornerstone and shaft of the monument were laid on June 3, 1904. The bronze soldier was dedicated on May 10, 1909.

  • Decade

    1900s

  • Geographic Coordinates

    36.056730 , -76.609580 View in Geobrowsemap pin

  • Supporting Sources

      "'The Green' Edenton N.C. and Edenton Bay," in Durwood Barbour Collection of North Carolina Postcards (P077), North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, (accessed May 14, 2013) Link

      "Confederate Monument [Chowan County], (sculpture)," Smithsonian Art Inventories Catalog, #IASNC000344, (accessed April 4, 2013) Link

      "Court House Green, Showing Confederate Monument and Edenton Bay, Edenton, N.C.," in Durwood Barbour Collection of North Carolina Postcards (P077), North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, (accessed May 14, 2013) Link

      "Edenton, N.C.," in North Carolina Postcard Collection (P052), North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, (accessed April 5, 2013) Link

      "Edenton, North Carolina," in Durwood Barbour Collection of North Carolina Postcards (P077), North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, (accessed May 14, 2013) Link

      Dillard, Richard. "The Civil War in Chowan County North Carolina" (Raleigh, 1916), (accessed April 5, 2013) Link

      Edenton Bell Battery. Edenton Bell Battery Company B of Moore's 3rd Battalion North Carolina Light Artillery. www.edentonbellbattyer.org, (accessed April 5, 2013) Link

      Kickler, Troy L. "Edenton Tea Party: An American First," North Carolina History Project, (accessed May 6, 2012) Link

      N.C. Historical Commission. Third Biennial Report if the North Carolina Historical Commission December 1, 1908 to November 30, 1910 (Raleigh: Edwards & Broughton Co., 1910), 38, (accessed April 5, 2013) Link

      North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources. "Chowan County," North Carolina Civil War Monuments, (accessed April 4, 2013) Link

      United Daughters of the Confederacy, North Carolina Division. Minutes of the Eighth Annual Convention of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, North Carolina Division, Held in Fayetteville, N.C., October 26, 28, 1904 (Newton, NC: Enterprise Job Print, 1905), 89, 98, (accessed April 5, 2013) Link

      United Daughters of the Confederacy, North Carolina Division. Minutes of the Fifth Annual Convention of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, North Carolina Division, Held in Charlotte, N.C., October 9, 10, 11, 1901 (Raleigh, NC: Capital Printing Company, Printers and Binders, 1902), 103, 133, (accessed April 5, 2013) Link

      United Daughters of the Confederacy, North Carolina Division. Minutes of the Thirteenth Annual Convention of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, North Carolina Division, Held at Wilmington, N.C., October 13th, 14th, 15th, 1909 (Newton, NC: Enterprise Print, 1910), 121, (accessed April 4, 2013) Link

      United Daughters of the Confederacy, North Carolina Division. Minutes of the Twentieth Annual Convention of the United Daughters of the Confederacy North Carolina Division, Held at Gastonia, North Carolina, October 11, 12, 13, 1916 (Wilmington, N.C: Wilmington Stamp and Printing Company), 109, (accessed September 7, 2012) Link

  • Public Site

    Yes

  • Materials & Techniques

    White granite, bronze, reinforced concrete

  • Sponsors

    Bell Battery Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. The first donation was made by a nine year old, W. D. Pruden, Jr., who gave two cents to the project.

  • Monument Cost

    $2,000

  • Monument Dedication and Unveiling

    Fundraising began in 1901, and by 1904 the chapter had secured enough funds to erect the base and shaft which were dedicated on June 3, 1904. On that day, seventy-five veterans were in attendance for the services which included the conferring of twelve Crosses of Honor and the "Rebel Yell" given by their recipients. The bronze statue was unveiled on May 10, 1909.

  • Subject Notes

    In the Civil War, Chowan County contributed men to the Albemarle Artillery, composed of enlisted men from North Carolina's eastern counties. Company B of Moore's 3rd Battalion North Carolina Light Artillery were so named "The Edenton Bell Battery" to reflect the bronze bells from Edenton buildings that were melted down to make guns and cannon to equip the company.

    The monument was built and dedicated in two stages. By 1904, sufficient funds had been raised to purchase and install the tall granite shaft. In 1909, the bronze soldier was added.

  • Location

    The monument originally stood in the lawn in front of the Old Colonial Courthouse on East King Street. Although just steps from the waterfront, the monument was placed with the soldier's back to the bay as he faced north. Today the monument sits on South Broad Street in a median between the lanes of the street. The soldier still stands facing north.

  • Landscape

    The monument sits in a grassy median between the two lanes of the street. It is mounted on a red brick paved area amidst low evergreen shrubbery.

  • Former Locations

    The monument originally stood in the square in front of the historic Chowan County Courthouse on King Street. It was moved to its present location on South Broad Street in June 1961.

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