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Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
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  • Monument Name

    Confederate Monument, Lincolnton

  • Type


  • Subjects

    Civil War

  • City


  • County


  • Description

    The monument is a marble drinking fountain placed under a granite arch. The arch is composed of a two-tier granite top placed over four large square columns which rest atop a base of granite with a marble inlay.

    Vintage postcard image of monument

  • Inscription



  • Custodian

    City of Lincolnton

  • Dedication Date

    May 11, 1911

  • Decade


  • Geographic Coordinates

    35.471430 , -81.257260 View in Geobrowsemap pin

  • Supporting Sources

      "A Great and Glorious Day," The Lincoln County News (Lincolnton, NC), May 12, 1911, 1

      "Confederate Monument to be Unveiled," The Lincoln County News (Lincolnton, NC), May 9, 1911, 1 Link

      "To the Confederate Soldiers of Lincoln County, (sculpture)," Smithsonian Art Inventories Catalog #IAS NC000291, (accessed March 7, 2013) Link

      MacKethan, Lulie Biggs. 1947. Chapter Histories : North Carolina Division, United Daughters of the Confederacy : 1897-1947, Raleigh, N.C.: North Carolina Division, United Daughters of the Confederacy, 77-78

      Nixon, Alfred. "Address at the Dedication of the Confederate Memorial Hall, Lincolnton, North Carolina August 27th, 1908," (Lincolnton, NC: Southern Stars Chapter U.D.C., 1908), (accessed May 24, 2012) Link

      North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources. "Lincolnton," North Carolina Civil War Monuments, (accessed March 7, 2013) Link

      “Lincolnton Commercial Historic District,” North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office, (accessed February 1, 2015) Link

  • Public Site


  • Materials & Techniques

    Granite, marble

  • Sponsors

    Wallace Reinhardt Chapter, Children of the Confederacy

  • Monument Cost


  • Monument Dedication and Unveiling

    A newspaper account of the unveiling reported that more than 6,000 people were positioned throughout the town for the event. The day began with a memorial service in the courthouse beginning at 9:30 a.m. with a prayer led by the Rev. W. R. Minter, the memorial address given by the Hon. A. Nixon, and a benediction by the Rev. W. P. Dye. A procession to various cemeteries around the town followed, where veterans and the United Daughters of the Confederacy placed evergreen wreaths and flowers upon the graves of veterans. At 11:00, a procession of Children of the Confederacy with carriages and floats went to the train station to meet Mrs. Stonewall Jackson and all proceeded to the monument for the unveiling. The monument was presented to Lincoln County by Major W. A. Graham, Commissioner of Agriculture of North Carolina. Judge Nixon accepted the monument, and addresses were given by Graham, Nixon, and Governor Kitchin.

  • Location

    The monument is located in front of the western entrance of the Lincoln County courthouse. The primary streets of Lincolnton (East and West Main, and North and South Aspen) radiate from the courthouse square; the monument stands at the intersection of Court Square Drive and West Main Street.
    The surrounding courthouse square is dotted with historic monuments, including the Lincoln County Veterans Memorial that sits right to the right and the Lincoln County War Memorial located at the eastern entrance of the courthouse building. A rock with embedded plaque memorializing the 1780 Battle of Ramsour’s Mill is on the North side of the courthouse.

  • Landscape

    The monument sits on a grassy area shaded by trees between the sidewalk and the city street.

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