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Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
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  • Monument Name

    Moores Creek Patriot Monument, Moores Creek National Battlefield

  • Type

    Obelisk

  • Subjects

    Revolutionary War

  • Creator

    Wilmington Stone and Granite Works, Unspecified

  • City

    Currie

  • County

    Pender

  • Description

    This 18” tall and 52” square brown sandstone obelisk was the first monument erected on the site. The choice of an obelisk for the monument reflects the cultural fascination with Ancient Egypt during the nineteenth century. Since its origins in Ancient Egypt, the obelisk has been seen as a symbol of reverence, dominance, and patriarchy. This obelisk is more ornate than the Moore Monument with six graduating squares, an ornate, floral dentil course underneath a small imposed pediment in the middle of the monument, and a band of a bundle of rods (fasces), which signify power and authority. Inscriptions of Caswell and Lillington on the east and west faces of the monument commemorate the colonels who led the patriots into battle.

    Over the years the monument has undergone significant additions and alterations, including two granite bases in 1906.

    Images: South Face | East Face | West Full View | West Face | North Face

  • Inscription

    South face: HERE LIE THE REMAINS OF / PRIVATE JOHN GRADY, / OF DUPLIN COUNTY, / WHO FELL BRAVELY FIGHTING FOR HIS / COUNTRY;—THE FIRST MARTYR IN / THE CAUSE OF FREEDOM IN NORTH / CAROLINA, AND THE ONLY WHIG / KILLED IN THIS BATTLE.

    East face: CASWELL

    West face: LILLINGTON

    North face: IN COMMEMORATION / OF THE BATTLE OF / MOORES CREEK BRIDGE, / FOUGHT HERE / 27TH FEBRUARY, 1776. / THE FIRST VICTORY GAINED / BY THE AMERICAN ARMS / IN THE WAR OF THE / REVOLUTION.

  • Custodian

    Moores Creek National Battlefield, National Park Service

  • Dedication Date

    February 27, 1857

  • Decade

    1850s

  • Geographic Coordinates

    34.506660 , -78.163330 View in Geobrowsemap pin

  • Supporting Sources

      Blakenship, Jamie. "Background Study on Fences and Monuments at Moores Creek National Battlefield," (Currie, NC: National Park Service, 1989), accessed December 6, 2012 Link

      Bloodworth, Mattie. History of Pender County, North Carolina, (Richmond, V.A. : Dietz Printing Co., ca. 1947), accessed December 6, 2012 Link

      Carraway, Gertude Sprague. [Scrapbook of clippings and other material dealing with the Moore's Creek battleground celebration and North Carolina's part in the Sesqui-Centennial Exposition at Philadelphia], (1926), accessed December 6, 2012 Link

      Hatch, Charles. "Moores Creek National Military Park, North Carolina: the Battle of Moores Creek Bridge," (Washington, D.C.: Office of History and Historic Architecture, 1969), accessed December 6, 2012 Link

      Hawes, E. A., Moore, J. F., and Thomas, Charles R. "Ceremonies at the unveiling of the monument upon Moore's Creek battle ground to the women of the Revolution, August, 1907," ([Pender County, N.C.: Moore's Creek Monument Association, 1907]), accessed December 6, 2012 Link

      United States Department of the Interior National Park Service. "National Park Service National Register of Historic Places Inventory - Nomination Form [Moore's Creek National Military Park No. 66000070]," ([1976]), accessed December 6, 2012 Link

      Wright, Joshua G. "Address delivered at the celebration of the battle of Moore's Creek Bridge, February 27th, 1857: by Joshua G. Wright, Esq.," (Wilmington, N.C.: Fulton & Price, Steam Power Printers, 1857), accessed December 14, 2012 Link

      “Battle of Moore’s Creek,” Fayetteville Observer (Fayetteville, NC), March 2, 1857, 3, (accessed January 13, 2013) Link

      “Moore’s Creek Celebration,” Fayetteville Observer (Fayetteville, NC) March 5, 1857, 2, (accessed January 7, 2013) Link

      “Moore’s Creek Monument,” Fayetteville Observer (Fayetteville, NC), January 12, 1857, 3, (accessed January 7, 2013) Link

  • Public Site

    Yes

  • Materials & Techniques

    Sandstone, granite, brick

  • Sponsors

    Moores Creek Monumental Association

  • Monument Cost

    $5,000

  • Monument Dedication and Unveiling

    Speaker Joshua G. Wright, a Wilmington lawyer, delivered the address recounting the details of the patriot victory to approximately 1,500-4,000 people in attendance. After the dedication speech, Dr. F.J. Hill, a relation of Colonel James Moore, deposited the box of Grady’s remains, sealed up the stone, and Rev. Mr. Grier read a benediction. The ceremony concluded with a military salute.

  • Nickname

    Grady Monument

  • Subject Notes

    The Battle of Moores Creek was fought on February 27, 1776. The monument commemorates the victory and honors the only patriot who died during the battle, Private John Grady of Duplin County. During the dedication ceremony in 1857, the cornerstone for the obelisk was laid into a brick foundation, which contained the reinterred remains of Grady. Sometime during 1857, the obelisk, imported from Philadelphia, was placed on top of the cornerstone and brick foundation.

  • Location

    The monument is located in close proximity to the Loyalist and Moore monuments and is on the south side of the walking trail.

  • Landscape

    The monument sits on top of a slight hill in a clearing beside a forested area.

  • Death Space

    Yes

  • Former Locations

    The Patriot Monument was moved on October 7, 1974 in preparation for the 1976 bicentennial celebrations and to improve the quality of the park experience.

  • Post Dedication Use

    An annual ceremony of the battle of Moores Creek is held in February and includes historic military demonstrations and reenactments.

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