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Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
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  • Monument Name

    Moores Creek Stage Road Monument, Moores Creek National Battlefield

  • Type

    Marker

  • Subjects

    Revolutionary War

  • Creator

    Meier's Marble and Granite Works, Unspecified

  • City

    Currie

  • County

    Pender

  • Description

    This monument is a 5’ x 8” granite boulder with a polished frame for the inscription and a small relief sculpture of a cannon below. The cannon faces the historic Negro Head Point Road and resides on the battlefield outside the reconstructed earthworks. Originally, the monument rested atop a concrete base that no longer remains.

  • Inscription

    OLD WILMINGTON AND FAYETTEVILLE STAGE ROAD / ROUTE TAKEN BY BRITISH AND TORY ARMY FROM / CROSS CREEK TO JOIN LORD CORNWALLIS AND / CLINTON AT WILMINGTON. THEY WERE DEFEATED IN / THE BATTLE OF THIS PLACE. 350 WERE CAPTURED / AS PRISONERS OF WAR FEB. 27, 1776

  • Custodian

    Moores Creek National Battlefield, National Park Service

  • Dedication Date

    July 27, 1911

  • Decade

    1910s

  • Geographic Coordinates

    34.458350 , -78.112590 View in Geobrowsemap pin

  • Supporting Sources

      "Old Wilmington and Fayetteville Stage Road," Markeroni.com, (accessed December 10, 2012) Link

      Blakenship, Jamie. "Background Study on Fences and Monuments at Moores Creek National Battlefield," (Currie, NC: National Park Service, 1989), accessed December 6, 2012 Link

      Capps, Michael A., and Davis, Steven A. "Moores Creek National Battlefield: An Administrative History," (Atlanta, GA: U.S. Dept. of the Interior, National Park Service, Southeast Regional Office, Cultural Resources Stewardship, 1999), accessed December 6, 2012 Link

      Carraway, Gertude Sprague. [Scrapbook of clippings and other material dealing with the Moore's Creek battleground celebration and North Carolina's part in the Sesqui-Centennial Exposition at Philadelphia], (1926), accessed December 6, 2012 Link

      Hatch, Charles. "Moores Creek National Military Park, North Carolina: the Battle of Moores Creek Bridge," (Washington, D.C.: Office of History and Historic Architecture, 1969), accessed December 6, 2012 Link

      Hawes, E. A., Moore, J. F., and Thomas, Charles R. "Ceremonies at the unveiling of the monument upon Moore's Creek battle ground to the women of the Revolution, August, 1907," ([Pender County, N.C.: Moore's Creek Monument Association, 1907]), accessed December 6, 2012 Link

      United States Department of the Interior National Park Service. "National Park Service National Register of Historic Places Inventory - Nomination Form [Moore's Creek National Military Park No. 66000070]," ([1976]), accessed December 6, 2012 Link

      Wright, Joshua G. "Address delivered at the celebration of the battle of Moore's Creek Bridge, February 27th, 1857: by Joshua G. Wright, Esq.," (Wilmington, N.C.: Fulton & Price, Steam Power Printers, 1857), accessed December 14, 2012 Link

      “Among the Dealers: Trade Changes and Work Being Done.” The Reporter, 44 (January 1911), 7, accessed December 14, 2012 Link

      “Old Battlefield a National Park,” New York Times (New York, NY), August 22, 1926, 10.

      “U.S. Takes over Battle Ground of First Victory in North Carolina,” The Atlanta Constitution (Atlanta, GA), August 12, 1926, 9.

  • Public Site

    Yes

  • Materials & Techniques

    Granite

  • Sponsors

    Moores Creek Monumental Association

  • Nickname

    Old Wilmington and Fayetteville Road Monument

  • Subject Notes

    The monument marks the location of the historic Wilmington-Fayetteville road traveled by both the Loyalist and Patriot forces.

  • Controversies

    According to the National Park Service, there is no evidence that this road was ever used by a stage or if it even connected to Fayetteville.

  • Location

    The monument is located next to the historic Negro Head Point Road on the battlefield.

  • Landscape

    The monument sits at the intersection of historic trails in a clearing before a forested area.

  • Former Locations

    The monument was moved from its original location on July 26, 1838 for restoration of the original earthworks on the battlefield.

  • Post Dedication Use

    An annual ceremony of the battle of Moores Creek is held in February with historic military demonstrations and reenactments.

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