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Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
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  • Monument Name

    Scotland County Confederate Soldiers Monument, Laurinburg

  • Type

    Common Soldier Statue

  • Subjects

    Civil War

  • City

    Laurinburg

  • County

    Scotland

  • Description

    The monument is composed of a granite statue of the Confederate Common Soldier placed atop a tall granite obelisk. The soldier stands at parade rest with a steadfast and fixed gaze, holding the barrel of his rifle. The base of the obelisk is inscribed on all four sides and presents bas-relief carvings of a cannon and crossed swords below the inscription on the front face. The front of the column shows a tall Confederate flag in bas-relief, unfurled and wrapped around its pole.

  • Inscription

    Front: CSA / 1861 - 1865 / TO THE / CONFEDERATE SOLDIERS / OF SCOTLAND COUNTY, / THE RECORD OF WHOSE / SUBLIME SELF-SACRIFICE / AND UNDYING DEVOTION / TO DUTY IN THE SERVICE / OF THEIR COUNTRY / IS THE FOND HERITAGE / OF A LOYAL POSTERITY / COMRADES / OUR CONFEDERATE HEROES

    Right: “WE CARE NOT WHENCE THEY CAME, / DEAR, IN THEIR LIFELESS CLAY; / WHETHER UNKNOWN OR KNOWN TO FAME, / THEIR CAUSE AND COUNTRY STILL THE SAME, / THEY DIED AND WORE THE GRAY.”

    Left: “LEST WE FORGET.” / 1861-1865

    Rear: FIRST AT BETHEL, / FARTHEST AT GETTYSBURG, / AND CHICAMAUGA, / LAST AT APPOMATTOX

  • Custodian

    Sons of Confederate Veterans

  • Dedication Date

    November 15, 1912

  • Decade

    1910s

  • Geographic Coordinates

    34.775890 , -79.460500 View in Geobrowsemap pin

  • Supporting Sources

      Myers, Betty P. 1975. "History," Scotland County North Carolina, scotlandcounty.org, (accessed March 21, 2013) Link

      National Park Service. "The Immortal Six Hundred," Fort Pulaski, (accessed March 21, 2013) Link

      North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources. "Laurinburg," North Carolina Civil War Monuments, (accessed September 5, 2012) Link

      United Daughters of the Confederacy, North Carolina Division. Minutes of the Fifteenth Annual Convention of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Held at Winston-Salem, North Carolina, October 25-27,1911 (Newton, N.C.: Enterprise Print, [1911]), 15, (accessed March 21, 2013) Link

      United Daughters of the Confederacy, North Carolina Division. Minutes of the Fourteenth Annual Convention of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, North Carolina Division, Held at Rocky Mount N.C., October 12th, 13th, 14th 1910, [Raleigh, NC: Capital Printing Co., 1910], 123, (accessed September 5, 2012) Link

      United Daughters of the Confederacy, North Carolina Division. Minutes of the Seventeenth Annual Convention of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Held at Tarboro, North Carolina, October 8, 9, and 10, 1913 (New Bern, N.C.: Owen G. Dunn, Printer, [1914]), 80, (accessed March 21, 2013) Link

      United Daughters of the Confederacy, North Carolina Division. Minutes of the Sixteenth Annual Convention of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Held at Salisbury, North Carolina, October 9, 10, and 11, 1912 (Goldsboro, N.C.: Nash Bros., Printers and Binders, 1913), 78, (accessed March 21, 2013) Link

      Wood, Julia. "Immortal 600 Remembered," Laurinburg Exchange (Laurinburg, NC), May 20, 2002

  • Public Site

    Yes

  • Materials & Techniques

    Granite

  • Sponsors

    United Daughters of the Confederacy, Quakenbush Chapter

  • Monument Cost

    $3,128

  • Monument Dedication and Unveiling

    General William R. Cox of Richmond, Virginia was speaker of the day, and a banquet was served to the veterans, the Sons of Veterans, and the Children of the Confederacy.

  • Subject Notes

    The monument is now used as a meeting place during Confederate Memorial Day to honor the “Immortal 600”, a group of 600 Confederate soldiers who were used as human shields to protect Union positions at Morris Island, S.C. Three members of the Immortal 600 were from Laurinburg.

  • Location

    The monument sits in front of the Scotland County Courthouse on the corner of Biggs and Roper Streets.

  • Landscape

    The monument sits in a grassy triangular median between the street and the courthouse parking lot. The Quakenbush Monument is located a few steps away on the other side of a sidewalk.

  • Former Locations

    The monument originally stood in front of the 1901 Courthouse in the center of the street at the corner of Main and Church Streets. It apparently became a traffic hazard and was moved onto the courthouse grounds. It was relocated to the contemporary county courthouse sometime following its construction in 1964.

    The following image shows part of the monument just barely visible on the right side, in its location on the grounds of the 1901 courthouse and to the right of the Quakenbush Monument.

    Photographic image

  • Post Dedication Use

    In 2002, people gathered at the Confederate Monument to honor Confederate Memorial Day and the Immortal 600. A gun salute was performed by reenactors, and "Dixie" was sung prior to the laying of flowers on the steps of the monument.

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