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Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
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  • Monument Name

    Isaac Hammond Memorial, Fayetteville

  • Type

    Marker

  • Subjects

    Historic African American Figures

    African American Monuments

    Revolutionary War, 1775-1783

  • City

    Fayetteville

  • County

    Cumberland

  • Description

    An arched granite slab rests on a rectangular granite base. Some images show the slab standing upright on the base.

  • Inscription

    OUR COMRADE / ISAAC HAMMOND / REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIER / AND / OFFICIAL FIFER -- 1797 / OF THE / FAYETTEVILLE INDEPENDENT / LIGHT INFANTRY / ERECTED BY THE F.I.L.I. / 1964

  • Dedication Date

    1964

  • Decade

    1960s

  • Geographic Coordinates

    35.053020 , -78.873730 View in Geobrowsemap pin

  • Supporting Sources

      "Fayetteville's 31 Day Salute to Feature Multiple Performances by Army Ground Forces Band," fayettevillepr.com, (accessed June 26, 2014) Link

      "Fifer's Grave," visitnc.com, (accessed June 26, 2014) Link

      "Isaac Hammond -- 1st Fifer," Waymarking.com, (accessed June 26, 2014) Link

      "Parade Grounds," fili1793.com, (accessed June 26, 2014) Link

      Barefoot, Daniel W. Touring North Carolina's Revolutionary War Sites. (Winston-Salem, NC: John F. Blair, 1998), 130, (accessed June 26, 2014) Link

      Poppele, Karen. "Tour Focuses on City's African-American Heritage," Up and Coming Weekly, February 8, 2013, (accessed June 27, 2014) Link

      United States Department of the Interior National Park Service, "Fayetteville Downtown Historic District Registration Form," May 26, 1999, (accessed June 27, 2014) Link

  • Public Site

    Yes

  • Sponsors

    Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry

  • Subject Notes

    Isaac Hammond (17?-1822), a free black barber in Fayetteville, was the company's first fifer for over 30 years. During the Revolutionary War, he enlisted in the 10th Regiment of the North Carolina Continental Line. In accordance with his request to be buried at the F.I.L.I. Parade Grounds so that he could be near the Company in spirit, he was buried with full military honors.

    The Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry was organized on August 23, 1793 and is the oldest existing volunteer militia company in the South. The unit was active from the Colonial Era through World War I but now serves a largely ceremonial role. FILI currently maintains a museum that includes artifacts from its founding to the present.

  • Location

    The parade ground can be found on the southwest corner of the intersection of North Cool Spring Street and Meeting Street within the Fayetteville Downtown Historic District.

  • Landscape

    The monument rests on a grassy plot facing North Cool Spring Street to the south of the monument that marks the 200th anniversary of the Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry. A brick pathway passes directly in front of the monuments, and Cross Creek flows nearby. Large shade trees and flowering bushes complete the park-like atmosphere.

  • Death Space

    Yes

  • Post Dedication Use

    Today, the F.I.L.I. are a fraternal service organization and continue to honor their veterans annually. A concert in tribute to Hammond and another fifer, Isham Blake, took place at the Grounds on May 26, 2012.

    Local military heritage tours and African-American heritage tours often include the FILI Parade Grounds.

    FILI also honors annual flag retirement ceremonies at the Parade Grounds with an honor guard.

Know anything else about this monument that isn't mentioned here? If you have additional information on this or any other monument in our collection fill out the form at the Contact Us link in the footer. Thank you.