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Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
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  • Monument Name

    Kings Mountain 1914 Chronicle Marker, Kings Mountain National Military Park, Blacksburg (SC)

  • Type

    Marker

  • Subjects

    Revolutionary War

  • City

    Blacksburg, SC

  • County

    York (SC)

  • Description

    This marker was erected as a replica of the weather-beaten 1815 Chronicle Marker. It was dedicated to the four patriot soldiers -- Major William Chronicle, Captain John Mattocks, William Raab, and John Boyd -- and the loyalist officer Colonel Patrick Ferguson and commemorated what was generally considered to be the location of their burial. This marker is a four foot tall stone in the style of a gravestone. It has a smooth front and rough cut sides and bears the inscription preserving the text of the 1815 Marker.

    Images: Historic postcard image of the Old and New Chronicle Monuments | Contemporary view of setting with Old Chronicle Monument to the left | Contemporary view of the monument's surface

  • Inscription

    SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF / MAJOR WILLIAM CHRONICLE CAPTAIN JOHN MATTOCKS / WILLIAM RABB AND JOHN BOYD, / WHO WERE KILLED AT THIS PLACE ON THE 7th OF / OCTOBER 1780 FIGHTING IN DEFENSE OF AMERICA. / COLONEL FERGUSON, AN OFFICER OF HIS BRITANNIC / MAJESTY WAS DEFEATED AND KILLED AT / THIS PLACE ON THE 7th OF OCTOBER 1780. / NOTE: THIS INSCRIPTION IS A COPY OF THAT ON / THE OLD MONUMENT ERECTED BY DR. WILLIAM / MCLEAN IN 1815 / THIS STONE HAS BEEN PLACED HERE BY THE KING’S / MOUNTAIN ASSOCIATION OF YORKVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA

  • Custodian

    National Park Service, Kings Mountain National Military Park

  • Dedication Date

    1914

  • Decade

    1910s

  • Geographic Coordinates

    35.143610 , -81.378880 View in Geobrowsemap pin

  • Supporting Sources

      "The Battle of Kings Mountain" in the Durwood Barbour Collection of North Carolina Postcards (P077), North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, (accessed September 30, 2013) Link

      Benson, John Lossing. Harpers' Popular Cyclopaedia of United States History from the Aboriginal Period to 1876 (New York: Harper and Brothers, 1881), 748, (accessed September 30, 2013) Link

      Carrillo, Richard F. "The Howser House and the Chronicle Grave and Mass Burial, King's Mountain National Military Park, South Carolina" (1976). Research Manuscript Series. Book 91. In the Scholar Commons | The Institutional Repository of the University of South Carolina, (accessed September 30, 2013) Link

      De Van Massey, Gregory. An Administrative History of Kings Mountain National Military Park, (U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Southeast Region, 1995)

      United States Department of the Interior National Park Service. "National Park Service National Register of Historic Places Inventory - Nomination Form [Kings Mountain National Military Park No.66000079]," June 6, 1976, (accessed May 2, 2013) Link

      Yancey, Noel. 2006. "Battle of King's Mountain," NCPEDIA, (accessed September 24, 2013) Link

  • Public Site

    Yes

  • Materials & Techniques

    Granite

  • Sponsors

    Kings Mountain Association of Yorkville [now York], South Carolina

  • Nickname

    The New Monument

  • Subject Notes

    Sometime around 1910, with conflicting records indicating 1909 and 1914, the Kings Mountain Association of Yorkville, South Carolina erected this marker to preserve the record of the earlier 1815 marker erected by Dr. William McLean and to verify the burial ground of patriots Major William Chronicle, Captain John Mattocks, William Raab, and John Boyd, and loyalist Patrick Ferguson. The face of the soft slate of the 1815 Chronicle Marker had been worn by time and weather with the inscription being lost to erosion. The new marker was inscribed to preserve the inscription of the older 1815 Chronicle Marker sitting to its left.

    Although the site was historically considered to be the burial place of the patriots and Loyalist Ferguson, an archaeological dig in the 1970s determined that no bodies lay below the earth under the marker.

    Both the New and Old Chronicle Markers sit across the trail from the Chronicle Fell Monument.

  • Controversies

    The National Park Service has noted conflicting dates regarding the marker’s construction and dedication. The alternate date is 1909, around the same time the Centennial Monument was erected.

  • Location

    The marker sits to the right of the 1815 Old Chronicle Marker and faces north towards the trail and across from the Chronicle Fell Monument.

  • Landscape

    The marker sits beneath trees amidst the heavily forested terrain of the park.

  • Death Space

    Yes

  • Post Dedication Use

    The site has been used for annual Fourth of July celebrations that include eighteenth-century military encampments, musket demonstrations, and fireworks.

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