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Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
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  • Monument Name

    Macon County Confederate Monument, Franklin

  • Type

    Common Soldier Statue

  • Subjects

    Civil War, 1861-1865

  • Creator

    McNeel Marble Company, Marietta, GA, Supplier

  • City

    Franklin

  • County

    Macon

  • Description

    Three wide tiered slabs form the base of a twenty-five foot high square pillar. The bottom four corners of the pillar are accented with small spheres. The pillar is topped with a six-foot tall Confederate soldier who stands, holding the barrel of his rifle with two hands.

    Seven units were memorialized on the monument. The county’s first Confederate military force was Company H, Sixteenth North Carolina Regiment; they were honored with their inscription placed directly above the primary inscription. The three remaining sides of the monuments each display an inscription to an infantry unit and below, a cavalry company.

  • Inscription

    IN MEMORY OF / THE SONS OF MACON COUNTY / WHO SERVED IN THE / CONFEDERATE ARMY / DURING THE / WAR PERIOD / 1861-1865 / CO. H, / 16TH REGIMENT, N.C.T. / INFANTRY

    West: CO. B. / 39TH REGIMENT N.C.T. / INFANTRY / CO. C. / 65TH REGIMENT N.C.T. / 6TH CAVALRY

    South: CO. D. / 62ND REGIMENT N.C.T. / INFANTRY / CO. K. / 9TH REGIMENT N.C.T. / 1ST CAVALRY

    East: CO. I. / 39TH REGIMENT N.C.T. / INFANTRY / CO. E. / 65TH REGIMENT N.C.T. / 6TH CAVALRY

  • Dedication Date

    September 30, 1909

  • Decade

    1900s

  • Geographic Coordinates

    35.181570 , -83.381340 View in Geobrowsemap pin

  • Supporting Sources

      "Macon County Historical Museum," Cultural Heritage Institutions of North Carolina, NC ECHO Project, North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources (accessed May 5, 2015) Link

      Confederate Veteran, 17 (1909), p. 540 Link

      Butler, Douglas J. North Carolina Civil War Monuments: An Illustrated History, (Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, 2013), 142.

      “Joins & Cunningham Building, Franklin, N.C.” in Durwood Barbour Collection of North Carolina Postcards (P077), North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives, Wilson Library, UNC-Chapel Hill Link

      “Macon County Coury [sic] House and Confederate Monument,” in Durwood Barbour Collection of North Carolina Postcards (P077), North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives, Wilson Library, UNC-Chapel Hill Link

      “Sons of Macon County Confederate Army Memorial,” Waymarking.com, (accessed April 29, 2015) Link

  • Public Site

    Yes

  • Materials & Techniques

    Marble

  • Sponsors

    Charles L. Robinson Camp, United Confederate Veterans

  • Monument Cost

    $1,650

  • Monument Dedication and Unveiling

    Roughly fifteen hundred people were present for the unveiling of the monument, including sixty veterans and the governors of North and South Carolina. The two-part ceremony was conducted by W. A. Curtis. The monument was unveiled by a cord pulled by seven women who were descendents of the commanding officers of the seven companies from Macon County who served in the Civil War.

    The first part of the ceremony included a speech by North Carolina governor W. W. Kitchin and songs sung by the Franklin Choir. The party broke for a meal in which the veterans and governors dined at the Junaluskee Inn, returning later in the afternoon. Then, Miss Clyde McGuire recited a poem called “The Conquered Banner,” which was the same poem her mother orated twenty years prior at the first reunion of Macon County Veterans. The poems were both recited under a torn flag of the 39th N.C. Regiment. The flag was held by J. W. Shelton, the last remaining color bearer of the regiment. The recitation was followed by a speech given by Governor M. F. Ansel of South Carolina, and sketches of each of the seven companies, written by Major N. P. Rankin.

  • Subject Notes

    The statue was sold by the McNeel Marble Company from Marietta, Georgia, which produced many other Confederate statues and sold them all over the South, including Pasquotank County Confederate Monument in Elizabeth City, Confederate Soldiers Monument in Hertford, Perquimans county, Alamance County Confederate Monument in Graham, and Confederate Monument in Durham.

  • Location

    The monument is located next to the old courthouse, which is currently the Macon County Historical Museum.

  • Landscape

    The monument is surrounded by a brick walkway lined with landscaped plants.

  • Death Space

    Yes

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