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Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
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  • Monument Name

    Nine Confederate Brothers [Tolar Memorial], Fayetteville

  • Type

    Column

  • Subjects

    Civil War, 1861-1865

  • Creator

    E.L. Remsburg, Fayetteville Marble and Granite Works, Fayetteville, N.C., Sculptor

  • City

    Fayetteville

  • County

    Cumberland

  • Description

    This monument was dedicated to nine brothers of the Tolar family from Cumberland County who died as Confederate soldiers in the Civil War. The column is made of stone and tapers upward to a pyramidal cap. It sits on a three tier base. The front is inscribed with a dedication to the brothers, and the sides are inscribed with their names, regiments, and battles where they died.

    Images: Right side | Left side | Back side

  • Inscription

    Front, on column: IN MEMORY OF / NINE TOLAR / BROTHERS / SONS OF / ROBERT & FRANCES / TOLAR / ALL BORN IN CUMBERLAND CO., NC / ALL VOLUNTEERED IN 1861. / THEY GAVE THEIR BEST SERVICE TO THIER / COUNTRY AS CONFEDERATE SOLDIERS. Front, on upper base: ERECTD FOR FATHER AND EIGHT UNCLES BY JOHN R. TOLAR, / WHO FROM AGE 15, SERVED / UNENLISTED IN ARMY OF TENN., C.S.A., LAST YEAR / OF THE WAR. Front, on middle base: TOLAR Right, on column: WILLIAM J. / CAPT. CO. B. 10, S.C.V. / SERIOUSLY WOUNDED, LEADING / A CHARGE, BATTLE OF ATLANTA, GA / JULY 22, 1864 / JOHN H. / 1ST LIEUT. CO.H. / ORR’S RIFLE REGT. S.C.V./ KILLED BATTLE OF THE WILDERNESS / MAY 5, 1864 / ROBERT M. / PRIVATE MUNN’S ARTILLERY 36 / N.C.V. CAPTURED AT SURRENDER / OF FORT FISHER, N.C. Rear, on column: MATTHEW A. / SERGT. / CUMMING’S BATTERY N.C.V. / THOMAS B. / SERGT. CO. B. 10, S.C.V. / WOUNDED BATTLE OF / MURFEESBORO, TENN. / DEC. 31, 1862 / DIED IN HOSPITAL UNION POINT, GA. / AUG. 5, 1863 / SAMPSOM B. / PRIVATE CO. K. 18, N.C.V. / WOUNDED HANOVER, VA. / MAY 22, 1862 / DISABLED FOR LATER SERVICE. Left, on column: ALFRED A. / CAPT. CO. K. 18, N.C.V. / WOUNDED THREE TIMES, LAST AT / GETTYSBURG JULY 2, 1863, WHERE / DISABLED FOR LATER ACTIVE SEREVICE / HAYNES L. / PRIVATE CO. K. 18, N.C.V. / KILLED ACCIDENTIALLY DURING SEVEN / DAYS BATTLES AROUND RICHMOND / JUNE 1861 / JOSEPH M. / BUGLER / CUMMING’S BATTERY N.C.V.

  • Custodian

    Cross Creek Cemetery, City of Fayetteville

  • Dedication Date

    February 1913

  • Decade

    1910s

  • Geographic Coordinates

    35.054500 , -78.872780 View in Geobrowsemap pin

  • Supporting Sources

      "Cross Creek Cemetery, Fayetteville, North Carolina," Waymarking.com, (accessed February 4, 2011) Link

      Confederate Veteran, 21 (1913), p. 225. Link

      Smith, Blanche Lucas. North Carolina's Confederate Monuments and Memorials, (Raleigh, NC: North Carolina Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, 1941)

      “Nine Brothers Honored by Single Monument,” News and Observer (Raleigh, NC), February 26, 1913

      “To Nine Heroes,” Fayetteville Weekly Observer (Fayetteville, NC), March 5, 1913

  • Public Site

    Yes

  • Materials & Techniques

    White Vermont marble

  • Sponsors

    John R. Tolar

  • Nickname

    Tolar Brothers Monument

  • Subject Notes

    John Tolar dedicated the monument in 1913 in honor of his father, Captain William J. Tolar and his brothers, all who joined up with the Confederate army in 1861 and subsequently died in battle. John Tolar was the President of Tolar-Hart Cotton Mills in Fayetteville and at one time a businessman in New York City, as reported by Blanche Smith.

    Cross Creek Cemetery is the oldest public cemetery in Fayetteville, NC begun in 1785. Mrs. Anna K. Kyle, who served as a nurse in the hospital here during the Civil War, established the Confederate Burial Ground soon after Union General William T. Sherman and his army left Fayetteville in March 1865. She and Fayetteville Mayor Archbald McLean selected a spot in the back section of the cemetery overlooking Cross Creek to inter the soldiers. The Rev. Joseph C. Huske of St. John's Episcopal Church officiated at a mass burial here later in the spring.

  • Location

    The memorial is located in Cross Creek Cemetery near the Cumberland County Confederate Monument which is believed to be the first Confederate monument erected in North Carolina. The Cross Creek Cemetery is off Cool Spring Street, about 300 feet NE of Evans Metropolitan AME Zion Church. It is at 301 N. Cool Spring Street, Fayetteville NC 28301.

  • Landscape

    The memorial column stands surrounded by graveyards.

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