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Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
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  • Monument Name

    Confederate Soldiers Monument, Monroe

  • Type

    Obelisk

  • Subjects

    Civil War

  • Creator

    Jacob Efird, Sculptor

  • City

    Monroe

  • County

    Union

  • Description

    This 40-foot granite monument was the culmination of efforts by the Monroe Chapter of the Daughters of the Confederacy to memorialize Confederate soldiers from Union County. Atop the three-tier granite foundation rests the base of the obelisk. The tall shaft is topped with a polished sphere. All four sides of the base are inscribed. The east face of the base features a Confederate flag, while the east and west faces depict crossed rifles and crossed cavalry sabers, respectively.

  • Inscription

    West Face, Base: 1861 / OUR / CONFEDERATE SOLDIERS

    West Face, Shaft: UDC

    North Face, Base: ERECTED BY THE MONROE CHAPTER / OF THE U.D.C. JULY 4, 1910. / DEDICATED TO / THE MEMORY OF / THE BOYS IN GRAY FROM / UNION COUNTY / WHO GAVE THEIR ALL TO THE / PROTECTION OF HOME / 1861-1865

    South Face, Base: UNION COUNTY’S VOLUNTEERS. / COMPANY B 15 N.C. REG’T MAY 1861. / ” B 26 N.C. ” JUNE 1861. / ” F 35 N.C. ” OCT. 1861. / ” D 37 N.C. ” SEPT. 1861. ” B 43 N.C. ” FEB. 1862. / ” A 48 N.C. ” MAR. 1862. / ” E 48 N.C. ” MAR. 1862. / ” F 48 N.C. ” MAR. 1862. / I 48 N.C. ” MAR. 1862. / ” I 53 N.C. ” MAR. 1862. / ARTILLERY / COMPANY C 10TH BATTALION MAR. 1862. / ” F 2ND N.C.REG’T JR. RESERVES.

    East Face, Base: 1865

    East Face, Shaft: UDC

  • Custodian

    Old County Courthouse, Union County

  • Dedication Date

    July 4, 1910

  • Decade

    1910s

  • Geographic Coordinates

    34.982820 , -80.550110 View in Geobrowsemap pin

  • Supporting Sources

      "Union County Court House, Monroe, N.C." in Durwood Barbour Collection of North Carolina Postcards (P077), North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Link

      Bell, Adam. "Marker Rejected for Slaves in South's Army - Union County Says Plan Poses an Inconsistency," Charlotte Observer, (Charlotte, NC), February 16, 2011, 1A

      Butler, Douglas. North Carolina Civil War monuments: an illustrated history (Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, 2013).

      Gomlak, Norman. “Confederate Monument Special To Women,” Charlotte Observer (Charlotte, NC), September 18, 1998.

      Stowe, Gene. “Square Around Old Courthouse To Be Landscaped,” Charlotte Observer (Charlotte, NC), June 12, 1986.

      “Monument Is Unveiled - Interesting Exercises Were Held at Monroe Yesterday,” The Evening Chronicle (Charlotte, NC), July 5, 1910.

      “Union Wants Monument - Plan for Confederate Memorial Well Under Way,” The Wilmington Morning Star (Wilmington, NC), December 24, 1909.

  • Public Site

    Yes

  • Materials & Techniques

    Granite

  • Sponsors

    Monroe Chapter No. 766 of the United Daughters of the Confederacy

  • Monument Cost

    $2,150

  • Monument Dedication and Unveiling

    Over 3,000 people attended the dedication ceremony for the monument. The Monroe Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy organized the events, incorporating the unveiling into the Fourth of July celebration. A group of children handled the actual unveiling of the monument. Walter Bickett, the Attorney General in 1910 who later became governor, spoke at the event.

  • Controversies

    The Confederate Soldiers Monument was part of a controversy sparked by a proposed monument celebrating black pensioners in the Confederate army. That monument was initially not approved because it names individuals who served while the Confederate monument lists only the names of units. Opponents of the new monument believed that the installation of a marker with names would elevate those individuals above the other soldiers memorialized in the existing monument.

    Protest from local citizens concerning its use by the UDC during Memorial Day celebrations has led to the discontinuation of this practice in recent years.

  • Location

    The monument is located directly in front of the Old County Courthouse on North Main Street.

  • Landscape

    The monument sits in the center of a brick walkway leading up to the entrance of the courthouse. There are flowers around the base, with a short black fence surrounding it.

  • Post Dedication Use

    The monument and other changes to the courthouse lawn that stemmed from it, like the incorporation of sidewalks and benches, established the area as the ceremonial center for community activities, such as parades. After the dedication of the monument, the United Daughters of the Confederacy continued to hold Memorial Day celebrations at the site until some residents protested the ceremonies.

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