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Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
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  • Monument Name

    Thomas Wolfe Monument, UNC (Chapel Hill)

  • Type

    Public Space

  • Subjects

    Historic Cultural Figures

    Educational Institutions

  • Creator

    Armistead Maupin, Designer

    Richard Kinnaird, Designer

    David Swanson, Architect

    Richmond, VA, Foundry

  • City

    Chapel Hill

  • County

    Orange

  • Description

    This monument honors author Thomas Wolfe. It is an 850 pound bronze bas-relief mounted on a freestanding brick wall. The relief depicts an angel, a reference to Wolfe’s most famous work, “Look Homeward, Angel”. The restoration of the monument was completed in 2006.

  • Inscription

    Front (inscribed on angel’s wing): OH LOST, AND BY THE WIND GRIEVED, GHOST, COME BACK AGAIN

    Rear: THOMAS WOLFE / UNC CLASS OF 1920 / REMEMBERING SPEECHLESSLY WE / SEEK THE GREAT FORGOTTEN LANGUAGE, / THE LOST LANE-END INTO HEAVEN, A / STONE, A LEAF, AN UNFOUND DOOR. / WHERE? WHEN? / LOOK HOMEWARD, ANGEL / 1929

  • Custodian

    Thomas Wolfe Society and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

  • Dedication Date

    May 1, 1969

  • Decade

    1960s

  • Geographic Coordinates

    35.910650 , -79.049410 View in Geobrowsemap pin

  • Supporting Sources

      "Thomas Wolfe Memorial," UNC Landmarks, (accessed March 13, 2012) Link

      "UNC Dedicates Wolfe Memorial on Campus," FYI Carolina, (accessed Feb 8, 2011) Link

  • Public Site

    Yes

  • Materials & Techniques

    Bronze, brick

  • Sponsors

    UNC Class of 1966

  • Location

    The monument is now located between Greenlaw and Murphey Halls on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

  • Former Locations

    The monument was unveiled in Person Hall in 1969 but was moved to an alcove next to the New East building on campus in 1972.

  • Post Dedication Use

    Though the New East location was appropriate, the monument was hidden and received few visitors and fell into disrepair. After a long campaign by admirers, the University restored the brass relief and mounted it on a free-standing brick wall in the memorial courtyard between Murphey and Greenlaw Halls.

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