Documenting the American South

Doc South header logo Home
Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
Commemorative Landscapes banner
  • Monument Name

    Service Memorial, Apex

  • Type

    War Memorial

  • Subjects

    Veterans of Multiple Wars

    Tragedy

    First Responders

    September 11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001

  • Creator

    Christina Hilt, Designer

  • City

    Apex

  • County

    Wake

  • Description

    A 6-inch cube of metal beam recovered from the rubble of the World Trade Center’s South Tower that rests atop a 5-foot granite monument. Written tributes adorn each of the four sides of the memorial. Paths made from engraved bricks radiate out from the center of the monument, forming the foundation of this space. One path leads to a 10-foot town clock. The memorial includes a brick wall designed as an area for visitors to sit and reflect.

  • Inscription

    Front of the granite marker: SEPTEMBER 11, 2001 / “WE WILL REMEMBER EVERY / RESCUER WHO DIED IN HONOR. / WE WILL REMEMBER EVERY / FAMILY THAT LIVES IN GRIEF.” / - PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH / NOVEMBER 11, 2001 / [MORE TEXT]

    Left side of the granite marker: SHANKSVILLE, PA / THE PENTAGON / IN HONOR AND MEMORY OF / THE PASSENGERS WHO / VALIANTLY FOUGHT AGAINST / THOSE THAT THREATENED / THE SAFETY OF THOUSANDS / OF AMERICANS. / “LET’S ROLLS” – TODD BEAMER / PASSENGER ON FLIGHT 93

    Right side of the granite marker: IRAQ / AFGHAN WARS / [MORE TEXT]

    In memory of the attacks on New York and for all Fire, Police and EMS personnel who live each day to protect our cities and towns / For those in Shanksville, Pennsylvania and at the Pentagon / Honoring those who served or are serving in wars in Iraq and Afghanistan / In tribute to all veterans

    The clock beside the monument reads: "TAKE TIME TO REMEMBER."

  • Custodian

    The Town of Apex

  • Dedication Date

    July 11, 2013

  • Decade

    2010s

  • Geographic Coordinates

    35.731760 , -78.850890 View in Geobrowsemap pin

  • Supporting Sources

      Rupp, Kelsey. "Apex Unveils First Responder Memorial," The News and Observer (Raleigh, NC), July 12, 2013, (accessed November 17, 2014) Link

      Smith, Ken. « Apex unveils 9/11 service memorial », wral.com, July 11, 2013, (accessed November 17, 2014) Link

      Town of Apex, North Carolina. "Service Memorial," (accessed November 17, 2014) Link

  • Public Site

    Yes

  • Materials & Techniques

    Steel, granite, and brick

  • Sponsors

    Town of Apex, individuals, local non-profits and private businesses.

  • Monument Dedication and Unveiling

    Originally, the monument was intended only to memorialize 9-11 first responders, but Apex officials decided to expand the subject to embrace both first responders and veterans of America's wars, in particular the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. Apex dedicated the monument on July 11, 2013. T. J. Deluca, an Apex firefighter who worked as a firefighter in New York City at the time of the 9-11 attacks, gave the dedication address. The ceremony also featured the Apex Police Department Honor Guard and the 82nd Airborne Chorus.

  • Nickname

    9/11 memorial

  • Subject Notes

    The Town of Apex received a 6-inch cube of metal beam recovered from the rubble of the World Trade Center’s South Tower. This has been the inspiration behind the Service Memorial. The memorial was the idea of Apex Town Manager Bruce Radford and Councilman Gene Schulze. Christina Hilt, president of CLH Designs, volunteered to design the memorial and had a final vision by November. Construction for the memorial began in June and finished last Friday when the granite column and steel cube were installed.

    To raise money, the town sold nearly 200 bricks for $200 each. Names of local first responders and veterans are inscribed on the bricks. The Apex Festival Commission donated an $18,000 classic town clock to stand behind the memorial.

  • Location

    Memorial is located in the heart of downtown at the corner of Salem Street and Saunders Street.

  • Landscape

    Paths made from engraved bricks radiate out from the center of the monument, forming the foundation of this space. A brick seating wall allows visitors to rest and reflect, while a 10-foot town clock reminds us all to take time to remember.

Know anything else about this monument that isn't mentioned here? If you have additional information on this or any other monument in our collection fill out the form at the Contact Us link in the footer. Thank you.