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Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
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  • Monument Name

    Delaware Monument, Guilford Courthouse

  • Type

    Grave

  • Subjects

    Revolutionary War

  • City

    Greensboro

  • County

    Guilford

  • Description

    This obelisk-style monument marks the graves of Privates Cornelius Hagney, John Toland and William Drew of Captain Robert Kirkwood’s Delaware Company. The remains of these men were found half a mile north of the park in July 1888. They were moved to the current location in August 1888 and marked with a marble monument.

  • Inscription

    THURSDAY / MARCH 15, 1781 / THREE CONTINENTAL SOLDIERS / REST HERE / IN FAME'S ETERNAL CAMPING GROUND

  • Custodian

    Guilford Courthouse National Military Park

  • Dedication Date

    August, 1888

  • Decade

    1880s

  • Geographic Coordinates

    36.133820 , -79.842560 View in Geobrowsemap pin

  • Supporting Sources

      "Arrangement for the Big Celebration at the Battle Ground," Greensboro Patriot Weekly (Greensboro, NC), June 17, 1903, 1 Link

      "Guilford Battle Ground Affairs," Greensboro Patriot Weekly (Greensboro, NC), June 1, 1903, 1-2 Link

      "Guilford Courthouse National Military Park," National Park Service, (accessed June 13, 2011) Link

      "Guilford: The Only Revolutionary Battlefield Now a National Park," Greensboro Patriot Weekly (Greensboro, NC), July 7, 1909, 1-3 Link

      "Inventory Form - Guilford Courthouse National Military Park," National Register of Historic Places, (accessed February 6, 2012) Link

      "Patriots Today Will Gather on Historic Grounds of Battle," Greensboro Daily News (Greensboro, NC), July 4, 1912 Link

      "Regulars For Guilford," Greensboro Daily News (Greensboro, NC), June 28, 1912, 1 Link

      "The Battle Ground Celebration," Greensboro Patriot Weekly (Greensboro, NC), July 5, 1905, 6 Link

      "The Battle Ground Company," Greensboro Patriot Weekly (Greensboro, NC), September 1, 1902, 1-2 Link

      "The Fourth at Guilford Battle Ground," Greensboro Patriot Weekly (Greensboro, NC), July 9, 1902, 1 Link

      "The Glorious Fourth," Greensboro Patriot Weekly (Greensboro, NC), July 1, 1901, 1 Link

      "Two Big Celebrations," Greensboro Patriot Weekly (Greensboro, NC), June 30, 1903, 1 Link

      A Memorial Volume of the Guilford Battle Ground Company, (Greensboro, NC: Guilford Battleground Company, 1893), 1-27, (accessed February 8, 2012) Link

      Baker, Thomas E., and Michael H. White. The Monuments at Guilford Courthouse National Military Park, North Carolina, (Greensboro, NC: Guilford Courthouse National Military Park, 1991)

      Banks, Howard O. "Report of Howard O. Banks to the 'Charlotte Observer' of the Celebration at Guilford Battle Ground, July 4th, 1893," (accessed May 16, 2012) Link

      Grimes, J. Bryan. "Why North Carolina Should Erect and Preserve Memorials and Mark Historic Places: Address Before the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association, Raleigh, N.C., November 4, 1909," ([Raleigh, NC: The News and Observer, 1909]), (accessed May 18, 2012) Link

  • Public Site

    Yes

  • Materials & Techniques

    Red, white and blue marble.

  • Nickname

    Continentals Monument

  • Subject Notes

    The remains of the three soldiers were found by Judge David Schenck, founder of the Guilford Battleground Company, on July 12, 1888. He was walking with his wife through a farm that neighbors the Guilford National Military Park and found bones protruding from of the ground. He was able to identify the soldiers as American Continentals by the buttons found with their remains. Because of their location, they are suspected to be the three members of Kirkwood’s Delaware Company who were killed during battle.

  • Landscape

    Marker can be reached from Guilford Courthouse Tour Road, on the left when traveling west.

  • Death Space

    Yes

  • Post Dedication Use

    Sometime after 1930 the shaft of this monument broke. About 18 inches of the shaft were discarded.

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