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Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
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  • Monument Name

    James Tate Grave, Guilford Courthouse

  • Type

    Grave

  • Subjects

    Revolutionary War

  • City

    Greensboro

  • County

    Guilford

  • Description

    The granite monument consists of a squat obelisk atop a square base. It measures 9 feet in height. It is inscribed on one of its four sides.

  • Inscription

    CAPT. JAMES TATE / VA. RIFLEMAN / MARCH 15, 1781

  • Custodian

    Guilford Courthouse National Military Park

  • Dedication Date

    May 27, 1891

  • Decade

    1890s

  • Geographic Coordinates

    36.131190 , -79.848410 View in Geobrowsemap pin

  • Supporting Sources

      "Arrangement for the Big Celebration at the Battle Ground," Greensboro Patriot Weekly (Greensboro, NC), June 17, 1903, 1 Link

      "Guilford Battle Ground Affairs," Greensboro Patriot Weekly (Greensboro, NC), June 1, 1903, 1-2 Link

      "Guilford: The Only Revolutionary Battlefield Now a National Park," Greensboro Patriot Weekly (Greensboro, NC), July 7, 1909, 1-3 Link

      "Inventory Form - Guilford Courthouse National Military Park," National Register of Historic Places, (accessed February 6, 2012) Link

      "Patriots Today Will Gather on Historic Grounds of Battle," Greensboro Daily News (Greensboro, NC), July 4, 1912 Link

      "Regulars For Guilford," Greensboro Daily News (Greensboro, NC), June 28, 1912, 1 Link

      "The Battle Ground Celebration," Greensboro Patriot Weekly (Greensboro, NC), July 5, 1905, 6 Link

      "The Battle Ground Company," Greensboro Patriot Weekly (Greensboro, NC), September 1, 1902, 1-2 Link

      "The Fourth at Guilford Battle Ground," Greensboro Patriot Weekly (Greensboro, NC), July 9, 1902, 1 Link

      "The Glorious Fourth," Greensboro Patriot Weekly (Greensboro, NC), July 1, 1901, 1 Link

      "Two Big Celebrations," Greensboro Patriot Weekly (Greensboro, NC), June 30, 1903, 1 Link

      A Memorial Volume of the Guilford Battle Ground Company, (Greensboro, NC: Guilford Battleground Company, 1893), 1-27, (accessed February 8, 2012) Link

      Baker, Thomas E., and Michael H. White. The Monuments at Guilford Courthouse National Military Park, North Carolina, (Greensboro, NC: Guilford Courthouse National Military Park, 1991)

      Banks, Howard O. "Report of Howard O. Banks to the 'Charlotte Observer' of the Celebration at Guilford Battle Ground, July 4th, 1893," (accessed May 16, 2012) Link

      Grimes, J. Bryan. "Why North Carolina Should Erect and Preserve Memorials and Mark Historic Places: Address Before the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association, Raleigh, N.C., November 4, 1909," ([Raleigh, NC: The News and Observer, 1909]), (accessed May 18, 2012) Link

      Grimes, J. Bryan. Remarks of J. Bryan Grimes: Responding for the State of North Carolina, Upon the Occasion of the Dedication of the Maine Monument at Salisbury, N.C., May 8, 1908, ([Raleigh, NC: J. Bryan Grimes], 1908), (accessed May 22, 2012) Link

      Grimes, John Bryan. Addresses at the Unveiling of the Bust of William A. Graham, (Raleigh, NC: Edwards & Broughton Printing Company, 1910), (accessed February 8, 2012) Link

      Williams, Charlotte Bryan Grimes. History of the Wake County Ladies Memorial Association: Confederate Memorials in Capitol Square, Memorial Pavilion, the House of Memory and Confederate Cemetery, (Raleigh, NC: United Daughters of the Confederacy, Johnston Pettigrew Chapter No. 95, 1938), (accessed May 16, 2012) Link

  • Public Site

    Yes

  • Materials & Techniques

    Granite

  • Subject Notes

    Capt. James Tate, born in Augusta County, Virginia, commanded a company of Virginia militia that supported Lt. Col. Henry “Lighthorse Harry” Lee’s infantry. He was killed in the battle of Guilford Courthouse, and originally buried at the New Garden Friend’s Meeting house, where he fell. In 1891 his remains were reinterred at their current site.

  • Landscape

    The monument is located in the woods not far off from New Garden Road.

  • Death Space

    Yes

  • Former Locations

    James Tate's remains were originally buried where he fell at the New Garden Friend’s Meeting House before being relocated in 1891.

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