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Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
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  • Monument Name

    Robert E. Lee Dixie Highway Marker, Marshall

  • Type

    Marker

  • Subjects

    Historic Military Figures

    Geography

    Civil War, 1861-1865

  • Creator

    Mrs. James Madison Gudger, Jr., Asheville, NC, Designer

  • City

    Marshall

  • County

    Madison

  • Description

    The memorial is comprised of a rectangular bronze plaque attached to a large granite bolder. A concrete base has been poured around the bolder. In relief inside an oval that encompasses one third of the plaque is a representation of General Robert E. Lee astride his horse Traveler. The inscription, also in relief, appears below the oval.

    Images: Plaque

  • Inscription

    ERECTED AND DEDICATED BY THE / UNITED DAUGHTERS OF THE CONFEDERACY / AND FRIENDS / IN LOVING MEMORY OF / ROBERT E. LEE / AND TO MARK THE ROUTE OF / THE DIXIE HIGHWAY / “THE SHAFT MEMORIAL AND HIGHWAY STRAIGHT / ATTEST HIS WORTH - HE COMETH TO HIS OWN” / - LITTLEFIELD - / ERECTED 1926

  • Custodian

    Madison County

  • Dedication Date

    November 11, 1927

  • Decade

    1920s

  • Geographic Coordinates

    35.797480 , -82.684000 View in Geobrowsemap pin

  • Supporting Sources

      "Robert E. Lee Dixie Highway," The Historical Marker Database, HMdb.org, (accessed June 22, 2016) Link

      Butler, Douglas J. Civil War Monuments, An Illustrated History (Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, Inc., 2013), 193

      Folder 0830: Marshall: Madison County Courthouse: Scan 3, in the North Carolina County Photographic Collection #P0001, North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Link

      “Daughters Will Donate Markers For State Roads,” The Robesonian (Lumberton, NC), October 26, 1925

      “Unveil Marker in Honor of Lee,” Asheville Citizen-Times (Asheville, NC), November 12, 1927

      “Welcome to Madison County, North Carolina,” Visit Madison County.com (accessed June 15, 2016) Link

  • Public Site

    Yes

  • Materials & Techniques

    Bronze, granite

  • Subject Notes

    The Dixie Highway was first planned in 1914 and became part of the National Auto Trail system and initially was intended to connect the Midwest with the South. Rather than a single highway the result was more a small network of interconnected paved roads. It was constructed and expanded from 1915 to 1927. The eastern route of the Dixie Highway mostly became U.S. Highway 25. Starting in the late 1920s, the United Daughters of the Confederacy placed bronze plaques on granite pillars to mark the route of the Dixie Highway and honor General Robert E. Lee. Surviving examples in North Carolina can be found in Marshall and Hot Springs in Madison County, in Asheville in Buncombe County and in Fletcher, Hendersonville and near Tuxedo all in Henderson County.

    The efforts to mark the Dixie Highway in North Carolina were led by Mrs. James Madison Gudger, Jr. of Asheville who also designed the plaque. The North Carolina Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy raised $800 to have the die cast for the plaque and then loan it to other states for marking their highways. Other states do not appear to have taken advantage of the die aside from an example in Greenville, South Carolina. It is thought that 10 total were made from this die leaving several unaccounted for.

  • Location

    The marker is located on the front lawn of the Madison County Courthouse at 2 North Main Street, Marshall, NC. It stands near the sidewalk to the left of the front entrance to courthouse. A few feet away is a memorial to Colonel Edward F. Rector of World War II “Flying Tiger” fame. Further to the left and closer to the building are two markers mounted on metal poles much like road signs. They commemorate the Buncombe Turnpike and David Vance (father of Zebulon Vance).

  • Landscape

    The memorial stands on the front lawn.

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