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Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
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  • Monument Name

    World War One Memorial Arch, Pisgah National Forest, Brevard

  • Type

    Arch or Gate

  • Subjects

    World War I

    Removed Monuments

  • City

    Brevard

  • County

    Transylvania

  • Description

    The since removed World War Memorial Arch spanned the Transylvania County entrance to Pisgah National Forest. A bronze eagle with spread wings crowned the arch which was supported by two pillars build of stones collected form the Davidson River and supported by iron bars. The pillars stood 20-feet tall with crenelated tops, much like a castle tower. Each pillar stood on a single 4X4 feet base which was mirrored by a ledge the same size half way up the pillar. Lamps were attached to this center ledge. The distance between the pillars was 16-feet while the arch was 4-feet wide and faced with smooth stone on the front for lettering. Bronze plaques were attached to the front of each tower.

    The arch was later removed to widen and pave the road leading into the forest. A large stone structure was built in its place to mark the entrance that stands on the right as one enters the park. The three plaques from the original arch were attached to the roadway side of the new structure. A small stone marker with a US Forest Service emblem stands across the road to the left. It is uncertain what happened to the eagle.

    Images: Plaques from the original arch | Dr. Hunt plaque | World War One plaque | War Dead plaque | Forest Service emblem | Far-off view of remains of the arch | Forest entrance

  • Inscription

    Removed arch: PISGAH / NATIONAL FOREST

    Current stone structure: PISGAH / NATIONAL / FOREST

    Dr. Hunt plaque: ORIGINATED AND PROMOTED / BY / DR. C.W. HUNT

    Dedication plaque: ERECTED BY CITIZENS / OF / TRANSYLVANIA COUNTY, N.C. / TO HONOR ITS MEN WHO SERVED / IN THE / 1917 WORLD WAR 1919 / FOR HONOR, HOME AND HUMANITY / THIS TABLET WAS GIVE BY / THE / BREVARD BETTERMENT ASSOCIATION

    War Dead plaque: IN LOVING MEMORY OF THOSE WHO / MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE / FOR THEIR COUNTRY / D. MONROE WILSON / BOYD WILEY ROSS / THOMAS JOSEPH TURNER / BRANCE LORENZO GLAZENER / ELLIS FREEMAN BARTON / SCOTT DOGGIN / BUFORD RAINES / THIS TABLET WAS GIVEN BY THE NATIONAL / LEAGUE FOR WOMAN’S SERVICE

  • Custodian

    National Park Service

  • Dedication Date

    September 3, 1923

  • Decade

    1920s

  • Geographic Coordinates

    35.274590 , -82.707240 View in Geobrowsemap pin

  • Supporting Sources

      "Memorial Arch at Entrance of Pisgah Forest Preserve Honors Heroes of Transylvania County," Asheville Citizen-Times (Asheville, North Carolina), September 4, 1923, 3

      Lewis, Jamie. "The Gift of the Pisgah National Forest," Peeling Back the Bark, Forest History Society, October 17, 2016, (accessed January 9, 2017) Link

      “A Detailed Description of the Monument with Cost of Each Item,” Brevard News (Brevard, NC), March 16, 1923

      “Co-operation Assured for Dr. C.W. Hunt,” Brevard News (Brevard, NC), January 19, 1923

      “Pisgah Forest World War Monument,” Brevard News (Brevard, NC), February 9, 1923

      “The Voice of The Stones,” Brevard News (Brevard, NC), January 26, 1923

  • Public Site

    Yes

  • Materials & Techniques

    Cobblestone masonry construction supported by iron rods, granite, bronze plaques and eagle

  • Sponsors

    Dr. C.W. Hunt, Brevard Betterment Association, National League for Woman’s Service, public subscription

  • Monument Cost

    Over $3,000

  • Monument Dedication and Unveiling

    The entire arch was shrouded in white fabric until unveiled by Mrs. Aaron Wilson, whose son Monroe Wilson died fighting and Mrs. Ross Wilson whose brother Boyd Wiley Ross also died in combat. Among those speaking was James A. Lockhart, commander of the North Carolina Department of the American Legion, who said “War accomplishes nothing and settles nothing. War to a nation is just as the tearing away of brambles in a field. It is what is sowed by a nation after a period of war that accomplishes.” Eugene Allison who accepted the memorial on behalf of World War veterans said his “only regret is that the names of veterans of the War Between the States is not engraved on bronze by the side of World War Veterans, because they taught us the spirit of liberty. Attendance for the day was estimated at 700.

  • Location

    The memorial plaques are located on Pisgah Highway (US-276) as one enters Pisgah National Forest near the junction with Hendersonville Highway (US-64) and Asheville Highway (NC-280) in Brevard, NC.

  • Landscape

    Remains of the memorial arch stand in Pisgah forest.

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