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Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
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  • Monument Name

    George Miller, Faithful Servant, Charlotte

  • Type

    Marker

  • Subjects

    African American Monuments

    Civil War, 1861-1865

  • City

    Charlotte

  • County

    Mecklenburg

  • Description

    The marker to George Miller is a short lectern shaped block of granite on a single granite base. Inscriptions appear on the top and front. This is one of the few marked graves in the African- American section of Elmwood/Pinewood Cemetery. Most had been marked with wooden stakes or plaques that have not survived.

  • Inscription

    Marker top: IN MEMORY OF / GEORGE MILLER

    Marker front: DIED JULY 27, 1925 / AGE ABOUT 75 YEARS. / A SLAVE AND ALL OF HIS LIFE / A LOYAL AND FAITHFUL / SERVANT OF / R.M. MILLER, SR. / THIS MONUMENT IS ERECTED / TO HIS MEMORY BY / R.M. MILLER, JR.

  • Custodian

    Elmwood/Pinewood Cemetery, City of Charlotte

  • Dedication Date

    Circa 1925

  • Decade

    1920s

  • Geographic Coordinates

    35.237510 , -80.845440 View in Geobrowsemap pin

  • Supporting Sources

      "Elmwood and Pinewood Cemetery, Charlotte, NC," Waymarking.com, (accessed May 6, 2017) Link

      Killeri, Kimberly. "Pinewood/Elmwood Cemetery, Charlotte, NC," published on Feb 4, 2013, (accessed May 6, 2017) Link

      Moore David A. “Question of the Queen City: Pinewood Cemetery,” Creative Loafing (Charlotte, NC), February 15, 2013 Link

      “Survey and Research on Elmwood/Pinewood Cemetery,” Charlotte-Mecklenburg Historic Landmarks Commission, May 13, 2001, www.cmhpf.org, (accessed April 13, 2017) Link

  • Public Site

    Yes

  • Materials & Techniques

    Granite

  • Sponsors

    R.M. Miller, Jr.

  • Subject Notes

    The original Elmwood Cemetery complex comprised of three separate burial grounds: Elmwood Cemetery plots were available to white citizens only; Pinewood Cemetery plots were available only to paying African Americans; and Potter’s Field used exclusively for the burial of white citizens who could not afford to purchase a plot. Potter’s Field was within the boundaries of all-white Elmwood Cemetery, but Pinewood Cemetery was designed as a completely separate burial ground. No roads connected the two and entrance to Pinewood’s unpaved roads was from 9th Street. During the 1930’s era of Jim Crow, a fence was erected between the two to further define their segregated status.

  • Controversies

    The Elmwood/Pinewood Cemetery was the center of a civil rights controversy in the late 1960’s. Fred Alexander, the first African American on the Charlotte city council, spearheaded a successful campaign to bring down the chain link fence that separated all-white Elmwood Cemetery from all-black Pinewood Cemetery.

  • Location

    The Elmwood/Pinewood Cemetery is located on the 700 block of West 6th Street in Charlotte, NC.

  • Landscape

    The marker stands in an open cemetery lawn with very few marked graves.

  • Death Space

    Yes

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