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Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina
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  • Monument Name

    Jefferson Davis Camp, Concord

  • Type

    Marker

  • Subjects

    Historic Political Figures

    Civil War, 1861-1865

  • City

    Concord

  • County

    Cabarrus

  • Description

    The Jefferson Davis Camp marker consists of a rectangular bronze tablet attached to a large, low to the ground, rounded boulder. In relief in the center of the tablet are three flags, the Confederate battle flag, the North Carolina State flag of the Confederacy and the national flag of the Confederacy. Although the tablet is dated 1939, news reports have the dedication as June 1941. Overgrown and ignored the area around the marker was properly landscaped and then rededicated in 2012.

  • Inscription

    MARKED BY THE DODSON RAMSEUR CHAPTER / UNITED DAUGHTERS OF THE CONFEDERACY 1939

    ON THIS SITE / AFTER THE EVACUATION OF RICHMOND / JEFFERSON DAVIS / PRESIDENT OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA / WITH HIS PERSONAL STAFF AND CABINET / CAMPED APRIL 18, 1865. / DISMOUNTING HE HITCHED HIS HORSE / TO A TREE WHICH STOOD ON THIS SPOT.

  • Custodian

    City of Concord

  • Dedication Date

    June 3, 1941

  • Decade

    1940s

  • Geographic Coordinates

    35.429520 , -80.599030 View in Geobrowsemap pin

  • Supporting Sources

      Knox, Michael. “Rededicated Marker Shows Where Jefferson Davis Hitched His Horse,” Independent Tribune (Concord, NC), June 27, 2012, (accessed June 22, 2017) Link

      Stokes Matt. 2007. “Last Days of the Confederacy: Jefferson Davis In Greensboro And Charlotte, April 1865,” NCPedia.org, (accessed June 22, 2017) Link

      “Jefferson Davis Camp,” The Historical Marker Database, HMdb.org, (accessed June 22, 2017) Link

  • Public Site

    Yes

  • Materials & Techniques

    Bronze, granite

  • Sponsors

    Dodson Ramseur Chapter United Daughters of the Confederacy

  • Subject Notes

    After Richmond fell on April 3, 1865, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, and his advisors fled the city on the railroad headed south, eventually spending 15 days in North Carolina. In route from Greensboro to Charlotte, the party spent the night of April 18 in Concord at the home of Confederate sympathizer Judge Victor C. Barringer on North Union Street.

  • Location

    The marker is on Earl Ave NE just north of Church Street in Concord, NC. It is on the right when traveling north from Church Street.

  • Landscape

    The marker rests next to a utility pole between a used car lot and former single family dwelling now used for a business. Industrial buildings are across the street.

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