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Colonial and State Records of North Carolina
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Letter from Richard Fitzwilliam to the [Board of Trade of Great Britain] [Extract]
Fitzwilliam, Richard
December 26, 1727
Volume 02, Pages 684-685

[B. P. R. O. Proprieties. B. T. Vol. 12. No. 84. R.]
LETTER FROM Mr FITZWILLIAM SURVEYOR GENl OF THE CUSTOMS, DATED DECEMr 26th 1727 RELATING TO AN ACT PASSED AT PENNSYLVANIA FOR ESTABLISHING COURTS OF JUDICATURE, AND ANOTHER PASSED IN VIRGINIA TO PREVENT BRINGING TOBACCO FROM CAROLINA INTO THAT COLONY.

Virginia December 26th 1727

My Lords,

* * * * * * *

In the Assembly held in Virginia in May 1726 A Bill was prepared by the House of Burgesses and sent up to the Council Entituled. An

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Act for the more effectual preventing the bringing Tobacco from North Carolina, and the bounds in Controversy, whereby all tobacco imported by land or water from that Province, is declared to be forfeited, and a penalty also laid upon the Importers. Upon the reading of this Bill I excepted against it, and at its passing, thought it my Duty as a Member of the Council to enter my Dissent, and to offer my reasons, which your Lordsps will find in the Journal of that Assembly the 24th of May; to which I have this further to add; that the restraining the people of North Carolina from selling or shipping off their Tobacco in Virginia, when they have neither shipping of their own, nor Ports to receive them must of consequence force them upon Manufactures of Cloathing for themselves since they are thus prevented of all Supplies by the produce of their Labour: and thus by a Partial Restraint of Trade from one part of his Majesty's Dominions to another, his Majesty's Customs are lessened, the consumption of British manufactures diminished, and instead thereof a Country which begins to grow Numerous laid under the necessity of falling into manufactures of their own: for it is impossible to imagine that a number of people should continue long under the want of necessary Cloathing, without exerting their Industry, especially when the Country they inhabite is capable of furnishing them with materials This I humbly offer to your Lordships consideration as my Sentimts of the two Acts above mentioned; hoping I shall not offend yor Lordsps by taking upon me to trouble you with what particularly concerns that part of the Trade and Navigation of Great Britain, which is put under my inspection within the Southern Provinces of this Continent: And tho my Office obliges me more particularly to correspond with the Commissioners of his Majestys Customs, yet I know none more proper than your Lordsps Board, to whom I can apply for checking the irregular proceedings of these Plantation Assemblys when they take upon them to Enact Laws in Contradiction to these, which the Wisdom of Parliament has thought necessary they should be governed by.

If your Lordships think fitt to allow me the liberty of laying before you from time to time, whatever of the like kind comes to my knowledge in the course of my Survey I shall be proud to Receive your Lordships Commands but if not, you will have the Goodness to pardon this trouble, which I have not presumed to offer but with a just regard to the Duty of my Office, and that particular Respect with which I am

My Lords
Your Lordships
Most obedient, and most humble Servant
R FITZWILLIAM.