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Letter from George Washington to Robert Dinwiddie
Washington, George, 1732-1799
June 10, 1754
Volume 05, Pages 128-129

[Reprinted from Dinwiddie Papers. Vol. 1. P. 197.]

Colonel Washington to Governor Dinwiddie.

10th June 1754.

Hon'ble Sir:

Your's of the 1st, 2nd and 4th Ult'o I received by the Post, and return your Honour my hearty thanks for your kind congratulations on our late success, which I hope to improve without risquing the imputation of rashness or hazarding what a prudent conduct wou'd forbid. I rejoice that I am likely to be happy under the command of an experienced Officer and man of Sense, it is what I have ardently wish'd for. I shall here beg leave to return my grateful thanks for your favour in promoting me to the Command of the Regiment, believe me, Hon'ble Sir, when I assure you my Breast is warm'd with every generous sentiment that your goodness can inspire; I want nothing but opportunity to testifie my sincere regard for your person, to whom I stand indebted for so many unmerited favours.

I hope Capt. McKay will have more sense than to insist upon any unreasonable distinction, tho'he and His have Com'ns from his Majesty; let him consider tho' we are greatly inferior in respect to profitable advantages, yet we have the same Spirit to serve our Gracious King as they have, and are as ready and willing to sacrifice our lives for our Country's as them; and here once more and for the last time, I must say this Will be a cancer that will grate some Officers of this Regiment beyond all measure, to serve upon such different terms, when their Lives, their Fortunes, and their Characters are equally, and I dare say as effectually expos'd as those who are happy enough to have King's Commissions.

-------------------- page 129 --------------------

I am much griev'd to find our Stores so slow advancing. God knows when we shall [be] able to do anything for to deserve better of our Country. I am, Hon'ble Sir, with the most sincere and unfeign'd Regard,

Y'r Honour's most Ob't and most H'ble Serv't.
Go. WASHINGTON.

The Contents of this Letter is a profound Secret.