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Letter from William Tryon to Alexander Colvill
Tryon, William, 1729-1788
April 22, 1765
Volume 07, Pages 9-10

[From Tryon's Letter Book.]
Letter from Governor Tryon to Lord Colvill

Wilmington, 22d April, 1765

I have the honor to inform your Lordship by Capt Lobb of an unfortunate affair that happened in this country last month between Lieut Whitehurst and Alexander Simpson, both of the Viper sloop, Mr Simpson challenged Mr Whitehurst to fight a duel, the consequence of which terminated in the death of Lieut Whitehurst about six days after he had his thigh broke by a pistol shot, and his head wounded in several places by the butt end of a horse pistol, of which the pan was broke by the violence of the blows he received on the head from Mr Simpson, Capt Lobb is capable of giving your Lordship a minute detail of this affair, and I have ordered the depositions taken before Governor Dobbs and myself and of two midshipmen belonging to the Viper, previous to Mr Whitehurst's death, with a copy of the inquest on his body, The commitment of

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Alexander Simpson, his escape, proclamation for the reapprehending of him, with the deposition in a court of law, taken, of the manner of his escape; all which proceedings, I have ordered to be fairly copied, and shall be transmitted to you as soon as possible; wherein I am satisfied, this government will not be found by the Lords of Admiralty, or your Lordship, to have given the least countenance to Mr Simpson's escape. As Mr Simpson conduct appears to have been actuated by the most savage principles of revenge, I own I was very desirous of putting him on his trial He was severely wounded by a shot that passed under one of his shoulders and came out at his arm. It is generally believed he was carried to Virginia, as it was imagined he was in too weak a state to be carried to Europe, I shall write to Lieut Governor Fauquer on this subject,

I am, my Lord, &ca