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Letter from Richard Caswell to Thomas Burke
Caswell, Richard, 1729-1789
February 26, 1777
Volume 11, Pages 396-397

TO DR. BURKE.
[From Executive Letter Book.]

North Carolina 26th Feb. 1777.

Dear Sir:—

I wrote you ten days ago by Col. Blount who I then thought would set out for Baltimore the next day. He is not yet gone. I have therefore an opportunity by him of sending this short epistle. I had your favour by Mr. Hooper who called on me on his way home four or five days ago. I am really sorry to hear of any jealousies entertained of the Northern States, being well convinced that on our union principally depends our success, and most cordially hope that every inducement to things of this kind will shortly be done away. As they, I understand have ordered a stop-page of their privateering business, more men from that quarter, I hope, will be found in the field. The information you

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was pleased to give Congress respecting my inclination to serve to the utmost of my power the cause of America was very just, and give me leave to assure you that nothing within the compass of my power shall be wanting to give the necessary assistance to the recruiting business. But I am really much concerned to find many of the officers, nay the greatest number, far from using that diligence I could wish, on this occasion. They seem, or at least such of them as I have conversed or corresponded with, desirous of going to the Northward but even there I fear their indolence will be such as to do no honor to their country or themselves.

Col. Blount carries my warrant to the Treasury, requiring the payment of 500,000 dollars to the order of our Treasurers, or either of them. He, as paymaster, has a draft for half that sum, which I must request the favour of you to assist him in procuring. The correspondence you propose with (me) every post is very agreeable to me. You will thereby lay me under great obligations, and enable me to give such intelligence to our enquiring countrymen as many of them think they are entitled to from a person in the station they have placed me

I am &c.
RICHARD CASWELL.
To Dr. Burke.