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Letter from Thomas Clark to James Hogg
Clark, Thomas, 1741-1792
September 06, 1778
Volume 13, Page 478

-------------------- page 478 --------------------
COL. Th. CLARK TO JAMES HOGG, ESQ., HILLSBORO.


Camp White Plains, Sept. 6th, 1778.

Dear Sir:

A few days ago I received a letter from your Brother dated New York August 19th 78. He complain that the hot weather has brought back a little of his old complaint, but is very anxious to return to Carolina, and hopes that time will be given him to consider the New Constitution and Laws before any oath is tendered him. He is also very desirous to have a meeting with me.

I have always had a great friendship for your Brother and never considered him as an enemy to this Country, I would be glad to have a meeting wt. him could it be done with any Convenience. Burgwin, Cruder, McCullock, and several other gentlemen from Carolina are at New York and I believe intend to make up the matter with their Country if they Can, a great change Mr. Hogg. The wisdom of Congress and the Conduct of Gen. Washington have waded through innumerable difficulties, but what can not a Country do when its liberties are at stake. Our independence is now I think firmly established by which Britain has lost her right hand. We have a fine army well disciplined, well armed and accoutered; what can they not do in this situation when they have performed wonders without any one of them. We charge them with Bayonets and with smaller numbers drove them before us, this is a fact. It is supposed they are about to leave New York. They are like the wandering Israelites equally cursed by their maker; this Campaign I think will deprive them of any foot hold in America.

Please make my Compliments to Mrs. Hogg and family and all friends.

I am Dr. Sir, your obedt humble Servt.
TH. CLARK.

P. S. Your Brother at present has a small touch of the Gout, should he come out this way I will do all in my power to procure him a safe pass to No. Carolina.

Edenton, Oct. 20th, 1778, taken out of the Post Office and forwarded by, Dr. Sir.

Your obedt Servt.
ARCH CORRIE.