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Colonial and State Records of North Carolina
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Minutes of the North Carolina Board of War
North Carolina. Board of War
September 14, 1780 - January 30, 1781
Volume 14, Pages 376-495

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PROCEEDINGS OF
—THE—
BOARD OF WAR.
1780.


State of North Carolina, Hillsborough, 14th September, 1780.

At a Board of War begun and held in the Town of Hillsborough on the Fourteenth day of September, in the year of our Lord one Thousand Seven Hundred and Eighty and in the fifth year of our Independence.

Present, the Honorable Alexander Martin, John Penn, Oroondates Davis, Esquires.

An order given Colonel Ambrose Ramsey, Chatham, for ten pounds Powder and Forty Weight of Lead.

An order given Colonel Thomas Taylor for Fifty pounds powder, 150 lbs. Lead and Arms for the Equipment of part of his Corps.

Instructions given Colonel Taylor relative to his forming a Junction with General Harrington's Forces near Cross Creek, scouring the County of Chatham of disaffected persons, procuring provisions, apprehending Deserters, &c.

Received from Robert Bignal, Esquire, Commissioner of Trade, sixty Thousand pounds, to be applied as directed by the Board of War.


Friday, 15th September, 1780.

An order given Colonel Ledburton for 6th powder and Lead equivalent.

Thomas Polk, Esquire, appointed Superintendent Commissary for the District of Salisbury.

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Ordered that the following be made out and sent Colonel Polk:

Instructions for Colo. Thomas Polk, Commissary of Provisions for the District of Salisbury:

That agreeable to act of Assembly County Commissioners are to be appointed immediately, for purchasing or impressing and collecting Specific provision Taxes and having the same transported to convenient places in the County.

Colo. Polk will therefore in the meantime procure all the provisions for the Army, granting Certificates for the same agreeable to said act, until the County Commissioners are appointed, whom he will Superintend and call upon for their respective Supplies, and have them transported to such places as the commanding Officer of the Troops may direct, and also make Monthly Returns to the Board of War of such provisions procured and collected as aforesaid.


3rd September.

Laid before the Board, by His Excellency the Governor, A Letter from Mr. David Ross of Virginia, relative to his having furnished this State with Bar Iron, Camp Kettles, &c., professing his Willingness to furnish further Supplies of those articles if wanted. Filed No. 1.


15th September.

A Letter from Colonel Thomas Polk, relative to the Military Operations carried on to the Westward &c. Filed No. 2.


14th September.

A Letter from General Davidson, relative to his Promotion, the Movement of the Enemy, &c. Filed No. 3.


5th September.

A Letter from General Harrington, relative to his force requesting Instructions &c., filed No. 4.

An Order given Colonel Thomas Taylor, of Orange County, for 75lb powder and 15 old Lead for the use of his Corps of Cavalry now in Service.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Mr. David Ross.

Sir:

Your Letter of the 3rd Instant, to Gov. Nash, is now before us. The Assembly having established a Board of War with extensive powers, we shall have occasion for Two Hundred Potts, or near that quantity, for our Troops. We are told that from two

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to three Gallons will be the best Sizes; if Kettles, will be lighter than Potts. We should be glad to have them in lieu of the others, also a Ton of Bar Iron. If you can send these Articles to this place or to Taylor's Ferry, on Roanoke, it will be rendering a very essential Service to this State. We are much distressed for Waggons occasioned by our late loss.

You may depend on being paid either by a Draught on your Governor or Money, agreeable to your Request. We shall be glad to hear from you as soon as you can on this Subject. Governor Nash will be on Roanoke for some time, who will make the necessary Draughts, we are empowered to make this Assurance.

A Letter sent Governor Jefferson, Virginia, requesting him to furnish and forward to this place Arms, &c., thro' Hurry not copied.

A Letter sent General Sumner, not copied for the same reason as above.

In consequence of a Resolve of the Gen'l Assembly, paid into the hands of Brigadier General Gregory Twenty-five Thousand Dollars.

An Order given General Gregory for 150 Flints and 15 Guns for the use of his Brigade.

Return of the Military and Quarter Master Stores by Abner Thomas, together with Return of Potts, Iron, &c., from Ross works, Vide Page—.

———


Saturday, 16th September, 1780.

Ordered that the following be addressed and delivered the Honorable Major General Gates:

The following is submitted to the Honorable Major General Gates:

From the unhealthy Situation of the Town of Halifax, and the number of Sick at that place at present, the Board are of Opinion that the Light Dragoons Stationed there might be removed to much more convenient and healthy Stations, where those in health might be employed against the Enemy to watch their Motions or cut off their supplies, and the sick provided with such Necessaries, suitable to their indisposition, to effect their recovery.

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The Board beg leave to recommend some place near Colo. Hawkins', in Warren County, as a suitable place for the sick, where there is good water, a pure air and all Necessaries; and further suggest that the Dragoons fit for duty might be well employed in Mecklenburg for the Purposes above mentioned, where, if they should be ordered, a Forage Master will be appointed to supply them with such Forage necessary and a Commissary with Provisions.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent the Hon'ble Major General Caswell:

Sir:

The General Assembly have appointed a Board of War whose Duty, among other things, it is to call upon all persons intrusted with public Money. You have supplied the Officers in the Staff Department. The Board will be obliged to you for the Amount thereof in particular, as well as for the amount of the several Sums you may have furnished others with, who have not accounted for the same. We hope to be able to examine into these Matters soon and wish for the vouchers as soon as possible.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent to Nicholas Long, Esq., Deputy Quarter Master Gen'l:

Sir:

The General Assembly having established a Board of War and vested in them the immediate Superintendence of the whole Military Operations within this State, it becomes our Duty and Business to request and order the following Stores to be sent forward to this place, To-Wit: Five Hundred Muskets with Bayonets, One Thousand Cartouch Boxes, Two Thousand pounds of powder, Twenty Thousand Cartridges, Two Thousand pounds of Lead, together with loose Ball and Cartridge paper. You will, as soon as conveniently may be, make a Return to the Board of all Horses, Wagons, Military Stores and Implements whatever under your care and Inspection, and continue to do so from Time to Time. Inclosed we send you a return of the Military Stores and Implements here Returns of Military Stores in Hands of Major Mazarett and James Havin, Commissary Military Stores.

Vide Page—.

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Sunday, 17th September, 1780.

An order given Colonel Wooten, Wake, for Arms for Thirtyfour men, Militia of his County now in Service.

An order given Colo. Dixon, Granville, for seven pounds Powder and Twenty pounds lead for the use of the Troops under his Command.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Governor Nash:

Sir:

Inclosed are the Letters the Board have received since you left this place. They contain the intelligence we have relative to the movement of the Enemy, except from a man who went out to inquire into their Situation. He says that the Enemy have but a small Force on Peedee, and that their Design was to collect Forage in this State, tho' as to that and their Numbers he seems to have had very imperfect Information. The Regular Troops at this place are in want of every Thing except arms; only one pair of Shoes for each Man was contained in the list made for them. We are of Opinion that it is proper to engage all the Shoes, Blankets and other things useful and necessary for the Army as soon as possible least Mr. Stanly should part from them, as it is very likely we shall have occasion to exert every nerve this Winter. The Board therefore recommend it to you to take such Measures as you may judge best for procuring Cloathing, &c., for the Army by pledging the Faith of this State to Mr. Stanly or in any other way you please. General Gates will draw bills on any State for what he uses. There are about One Thousand Maryland Troops ordered to join the Regulars here. They will wear out their Shoes by the time they get here, and unless a provision is made will be obliged to stay a long time to be equipped. In our Situation we conceive it to be our duty to forward the service all we can, and to settle accounts after we have beaten the Enemy.

By Order of the Board, paid into the hands of Captain Merritt, who defeated John Kimborough and his Party, One Thousand Dollars.

Absent Colonel Martin and Mr. Davis.

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Monday, 18th September, 1780.

An Order given Colo. Taylor, Granville, for 50 Muskets, 8 ℔. Powder and 12 ℔. Lead for the use of the Troops under his Command.

On the representation of Colo. Luttrell and others that the disaffected in the Counties of Chatham and Randolph were about to assemble, &c.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Colo. Ambrose Ramsey, Chatham:

Sir:

From the representation of Colonel Luttrell, Mr. William Kitchen and others, it appears that the Tories are grown insolent to such a degree as to demand an immediate Check. It is said that Fifty Horses have been taken away in a few days, and that they have the Audacity to assemble in the Day time, having taken Eight or more Horses from Wilcox Forge. Colonel Martin and Mr. Davis are gone Home, but requested that I would continue at this place in order to expedite Business, and to do what appeared to me to be proper upon all occasions; I have, therefore, enclosed a blank Commission to you for the purpose of appointing an active, spirited, prudent Officer to head Fifty men. I think it would be prudent for all, or the greatest part, to have a good horse; Rifles will answer better than pistols and Swords, as they can dismount occasionally. I would prefer the men in your own Country, as they understand the Woods and People better than any from a distance can. It would be proper to exempt those that perform this duty from a Draft, as this Service for the whole time ought to stand for a Tour of Duty. You will be so good as to inform the officer that he should be constantly changing his Grounds, and never to encamp all night or stay where he has had a fire. The proper way is, after it is dark to move with great Silence to some distance and when he stops to have no Fire or Noise. Whoever are found in Arms should beseverely dealt with—I mean in action—and not after they are Prisoners, as I think a spirited Conduct for some time necessary to quell the Tories and keep them in awe. I have taken the Freedom to give you my Sentiments, which, if you approve of, I hope you will have carried into execution. You will

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be pleased to give such directions as you think best for supplying the men with provisions. You will direct the Officer to disarm all that you think will be opposed to us, but great care should be taken not to rob or plunder indiscriminately. As I wish this party to go into Randolf County, you will at any Time afford them further Assistance by calling out such a Body of the Miliati as may be necessary; one thing I will observe, and that is, a large number will be more easily surprised, and they will be more an object of the Enemy's Attention. Any man now drafted may be employed, but let them be all picked men; apprehend every man that is suspected of being employed by our Enemy.

Colo. Philip Taylor, with his Company of Horse, ordered to proceed to and remain in Chatham County until a Company can be raised there for the purpose of awing and preventing the depredations and Mal-practice of the disaffected of those parts.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent the Commissioners of confiscated Property in the County of Chatham:

Gentlemen:

As the General Assembly have suspended the operation of the Confiscation Act until the next Session, the Board are of opinion that the negroes lately imployed at Wilcox's Iron Works, being confiscated Property, should be returned to that place and there imployed again in the public Service about the Iron Factory, so essentially necessary at present.

The Commissioners of confiscated Property are hereby required to return to the said Works all said Negros, to be imployed by Mr. John Wilcox at the same place for the purpose aforesaid.

———


Tuesday, 19th September, 1780.

Received a letter from General Smallwood, signifying the acceptance of the Gratuity voted by the General Assembly to the Officers of the Maryland and other Lines who lost their Baggage in the defeat near Camden, returning Thanks therefor and requesting the delivery of the sum. Filed No. 5.

An express sent with Order to Colonel Taylor to delay the March of his Company for Chatham County, in order that if wanted they may compose an Escort for General Smallwood from

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this to Head quarters on the Yadkin, himself and Company to employ themselves as before.

Received by the Board from the Honbl. Robert Bignall, Esquire, Commissioner of Trade, Sixty Thousand pounds, in consequence of a Resolve of the General Assembly in favour of the officers of the Maryland and other Lines who lost their Baggage in the late action near Camden, which said sum is, by order of the Board, delivered into the hands of Lieutenant Denny, pursuant to the Request of General Smallwood.

———


Wednesday, 20th September, 1780.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent General Jones:

Sir:

I am this day informed by a Letter to General Gates from Colonel Marion that the Tories have embodied in Bladen County; they have been twice routed by the Colonel; in one Action he killed and took Thirty. A Detachment of Four Hundred from Lord Cornwallis are sent to join them; this Movement of the Enemy makes it highly necessary that your Brigade should move on, or as many as are equipped, without delay to Cross Creek to join General Harrington. They burn all the Houses of our Friends that are absent. I expect General Smallwood will take the Command of our Militia, and that he will set off to the Northward in a few Days.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Brigadier Genl. Harrington:

Sir:

General Gates was so obliging as to show me a letter this Day from Colonel Marion, informing him of the Insurgents in Bladen County, and of the Detachment from Lord Cornwallis to aid and assist them. General Gates informs me that he has wrote to the Colonel to apply to you for Directions how to act.

It is unnecessary for me to add any thing on that Head, tho' it may be proper for you to write to General Jones, of Halifax District, to send on his Brigade, or such part as are equipped, immediately. If you think the Stores in Wilmington are in danger,

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would it not be proper to have them brought to Cross Creek by Water and sent to this place? We shall be in great want of Salt if any Accident happens to what is at Cross Creek. Should you think it necessary to remove the Stores there you will order Waggons to be impressed and send them on. As I am very desirous to procure Shoes for the Regular Troops here, I shall be glad to know if Leather can be got at Cross Creek, one Hide tanned for two raw; if so, do give directions for sending on as much as can be got, and I will order the raw Hides from this place by the Waggons that return or go for the Stores. If you cannot get Waggons let me hear from you, if it is necessary to remove the stores, as soon as you can, and I will endeavor to send them from this place.

Mr. John Taylor, Hillsborough, appointed Commissary of Hides for Hillsborough District.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent the Honorable Major General Gates:

Sir:

I have appointed Mr. John Taylor Commissary of Hides for this District, as he is very active and may be depended on. I recommend him to you as a very proper person to take Care of the Hides belonging to the Continent here; the whole will not employ much of his time.

———


Thursday, 21st September, 1780.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent to General Butler:

Sir:

Inclosed is a list of the Articles taken by Colonel Moore, of Caswell, out of a Waggon belonging to this State, on its way here. You will direct Colonel Moore to produce the Potts, Kettles, &c., for the use of your Brigade; also to account for the Bar Iron. Two Hundred and Seventy Weight appears to be too large a Quantity for any use he could have; it is an Article much wanted by the public, and Colo. Moore ought to produce it.

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Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Colonel Ambrose Ramsey, Chatham:

Sir:

Mr. Charles Bruce has in his possession a large Quantity of Money, and is now on his way to Little River and Duplin County. He has applied to me for a Guard, thinking it dangerous to go without; as I expect you can spare some of the Light Horse, I advise you to raise it. It would be proper to afford him Assistance in driving away the latter; do, therefore, direct a Party for that purpose. Enclosed is a Letter for Colonel Taylor, of Orange County. If he is in your County or the next, give it a pass.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent to Colonel Thomas Taylor, enclosed in the above:

Sir:

Inclosed is a Letter from Mr. Benton. If you can afford any assistance to our Friends, I shall be glad you will do it. If you have joined any officer superior to yourself and Rank, you will apply to him for Directions; if not, use your own discretion how you'll act. I take the Liberty to advise you to change your Ground every day and never stay all night where you have stopped in the day; after eating your supper, and as soon as it is dark, move some distance without noise, and then encamp without Fire. Be sure to have Silence; this will prevent your being surprised.

Disarm all that are suspected of being Tories, and indeed care should be taken to remove such Horses as will make Dragoons from the Neighbourhood of the Enemy, especially from those that are our Enemies. That great care must be taken not to let the Soldiers plunder. What you take in this way should be for the country.

Received a letter from Colo. Philip Taylor, relative to the movements of his Company of Horse, Transactions in Chatham and Randolf Counties, &c. Filed No. 6.


20 September, 1780.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Colonel Philip Taylor:

Sir:

I am sorry you did not send the Escort to carry the Cartouch Boxes as I desired. They would have been very useful to you,

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and I have no way of contriving them, all the Horses this way being engaged in Waggons and expresses. I have desired the Express you sent to me to enquire, and several others, but there are no horses to be got.

General Smallwood is unwilling to detain you and your men any longer, as he finds it out of his power to set off as soon as he expected, and the light Horse from Halifax will be here in a few days, which will serve as an Escort for him. You will, therefore, proceed on your March to Salisbury as expeditiously as you can, not to hurt your Horse.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Brigadier General Sumner:

Sir:

I expect General Smallwood will set off soon to join you, as he is only waiting for a few necessaries, having left all his Baggage in the late Engagement, and I am not without hopes of his bringing some Regulars with him. I mention this to you as a reason why I think it would be proper to avoid an Engagement with the Enemy. I mean a general Action, as another Defeat would be attended with Consequences too fatal to mention. Skirmishing would encourage the Militia and give them Spirits. You will excuse my freedom in mentioning this, as I am persuaded you will do all you can for your Country.

———


Friday, 22d September, 1780.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent to Mr. Alexander Mebane, Commissioner, Orange County:

Sir:

I am informed by General Gates that he is in great want of Provision for the Troops under his Command, as well as Forage for the Horse; that, unless he can be supplied by having Magazines laid up by the State, he shall be under the Necessity of permitting the Army to carve for itself, or must move the Troops away; he expresses an unwillingness to do either. From the situation we are in, and the Necessity of procuring Supplies for the Army without delay, I desire that you will lose no time in obtaining them. You will try to purchase from the Farmers, but, if

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they refuse to sell, you must then seize both provision for the men and Forage for the Horse. Be careful to comply, as near as you can, with the act of Assembly, both as to the Quantity you take and the certificates you give. You will inform me from Time to Time how you proceed.

———


Friday, 22d September, 1780.

Received, previous to the foregoing, a Letter from the Honorable Major General Gates, enclosing a Letter from Doctor Burke, the former urging the Necessity of competent Magazines for the support of the Army being immediately provided, the latter complaining of the licentious Conduct of the Quarter Master and others in that Department. Filed No. 7.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Colo. Robert Rowan, Cumberland:

Sir:

I have been informed that a large Quantity of Leather may be got at Cross Creek, one tanned Hide for two raw. I shall be obliged to you to enquire, and, if you can, to engage as much as will make from Five Hundred to Fifteen Hundred pair of Shoes. Procure Waggons to send the Leather here, and I will engage to send the Hides by those that go for the Stores. I am very anxious to procure Shoes for the Regulars, as they cannot move from this place without, and we much want them in the Field again.

I wish to know what Shoes there are at Cross Creek for the State; if there should be occasion to remove them, you will impress what Waggons you can, and will write to me for as many as you want. General Harrington will advise you on this Head.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Brigadier General Harrington:

Sir:

The Gentlemen appointed to act with me as a Board of War left this place soon after their Appointment. Having long been detained in the Assembly, they thought it absolutely necessary to go Home for a few days, but will soon return. I have, at their request, in their absence, continued to do Business, there being a necessity for it.

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General Gates informed me two days ago that he thought, from the Force embodied in Bladen, our stores at Wilmington and Cross Creek were in danger. I wrote to you by the express, desiring you to impress Waggons, if to be got, and send the Stores this way, provided you thought it necessary, at the same time mentioning the propriety of getting what Leather was there, if to be had, one tanned for two raw Hides; and I would take care to send the raw Hides from this place by the Waggons going for the Stores. I want the Leather to shoe the regular Troops as soon as possible, that we may have their Assistance again; but, as you are like to have Employment in a different way, I shall be obliged to you to deliver the enclosed to Colonel Rowan, with your Advice how he should act.

Your Letter to General Gates of the 19th Instant is now before me, and am sorry that you have not received a Letter which the Board of War wrote to you, informing you that Colonel Taylor was sent to Chatham for a few days to quell the Tories, there and that he would obey any Directions he should receive from you.

I highly approve of your Assisting our Friends wherever you can, especially Colonel Kobb, who appears to be an active, good officer.

From your Situation you can judge much better than the Board of War how to direct the Movement of our Troops to the Southward; you will therefore give such Directions to Colonel Thomas Taylor for his Conduct as you think best for the public good; you will also judge of the propriety of your taking any other Post yourself. You know the Country and the Necessity of keeping a proper Guard at Cross Creek; however, I wish you to look upon yourself at Liberty to act as you think best until you are under the immediate Command of an older Officer. I have wrote to General Jones, desiring him to march his Brigade, or such part thereof as are equipped, as soon as possible to Cross Creek himself, he will, as oldest Officer, have to command.

I shall remain at Hillsborough until my Colleagues return. You will therefore let me hear from you as often as you think it necessary.

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Ordered that the following be made out and sent General Sumner:

Sir:

I expect General Smallwood will in a few days set off to the Northward to take the Command of the Militia of this State; he is only waiting for a few Necessaries, having lost his whole Baggage. I have hopes he will carry a few regular Troops with him. You in the mean time have the Command of all our Troops. I cannot help repeating to you that a general Action will be attended with fatal Consequences if we should be again routed. I would rather venture to recommend Skirmishing, as it will oblige the Enemy to keep in a more compact Body, and prevent their plundering parties from doing as much Mischief as they otherwise would; besides, it will give the Militia Spirits. General Butler will be with you soon; he starts to-morrow.

Ordered that the following be addressed and handed the Honorable Major General Gates:

Sir:

Your favor of this date, enclosing a Letter from Thomas Burke, Esquire, addressed to you, I am to acknowledge. The Observations made by the General and Field Officers under your Command, in regard to the Supplying an Army, are undoubtedly true; for unless Provisions are procured for the Troops they must get supplies for themselves; this no man can deny. In order, as far as I can, to prevent the ill Consequences taking place, as mentioned by Doctor Burke, in regard to the manner of Seizing and granting Certificates, I have directed Mr. Alexander Mebane to do every thing in his power to procure Provision for the Army; I send you his instructions. I have wrote to the Officers in the different Counties to have Commissioners appointed, agreeable to the act of the Assembly for Collecting the Tax. You may depend on every Action and Assistance that the Board of War can make in order to support the Army under your Command.

An order given Colonel Thomas Taylor: 10 Guns, 3℔s Powder, 12℔s Lead and Twenty Flints for the use of his Compy.

Ordered that copies of the following be made and sent the Commanding Officers of the Counties of Wake, Chatham, Caswell,

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Granville, and Warren, and Mr. George Fletcher, Commissary Cumberland County:

Sir:

The General Assembly having made an act for a Specific Grain Tax, and also having directed the Sheriff of each County within this State to Summon Five Justices thereof who shall accordingly meet within Three days next after such notice and nominate and appoint a proper person as Commissioner to receive such Tax, &c., who shall appoint Ware Houses or Magazines, for the Reception thereof, not exceeding three in each County, I request that you will endeavour to have this Business done as soon as possible, as the Public will want all the Grain that can be got, and as expeditiously as may be. I wish to hear from you in what manner of forwardness this Business is conducted from time to time.

———


Saturday, 23rd September, 1780.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Brigadier General Butler:

Sir:

General Gates this day informed me that he expected near Four Thousand Troops from Maryland and Virginia at this place soon; he has received Intelligence that makes it proper for you to march to Salisbury as soon as you can, as General Sumner has moved from there. You may be assured that I will send on Cartouch Boxes as soon as they arrive at this place.

I this minute have got a letter from Cross Creek, informing me of a large quantity of Powder and Lead there, and the propriety of removing it to this place; this will make Wagons very much in demand. Could you not therefore spare one of your Baggage Waggons from the Brigade? I will not detain it any longer than the Cartouch Boxes get here, which I expect will be to-day or to-morrow. It would be proper to leave a Guard to attend the Waggon. I wish you to lose no time in your March to Salisbury. There is a Field Piece at Guilford; do write to me whether it is in good Order for use, as it should be repaired if necessary.

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Ordered that the following be made out and sent Colonel Ambrose Ramsey, Chatham;

Sir:

I have sent your Letter to Genl. Butler; as it was open I read it, to judge whether the Bearer should go after the General for an answer, he having marched yesterday.

From the Representation made to me, I supposed it proper to have some Light Horse embodied in your County to suppress the Insurgents there and in Randolf; however, I highly approve of your sending them to Peedee, as I wish to protect our Friends in every Quarter.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent General Butler:

Sir:

The Society of People called Moravians, in Surry County, have agreed with General Gates to send one Hundred Sides of tanned Leather to this Place, but are desirous of having a Guard part of the way to prevent being robbed. As it is of great importance to have the Leather as soon as we can, I recommend it to you to give directions that a proper Guard may be furnished as far as you think it necessary; the Leather will be ready by the time the Guard can be got. Three or four Sets of Shoe Maker's Tools are absolutely necessary, if they can possibly be got. Send them with the leather. They have promised to provide a Waggon.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Brigadier General Harrington:

Sir:

I am informed by Mr. George Fletcher, who acts as purchasing Commissary near Cross Creek, that he cannot collect and drive Cattle without Assistance given him for that purpose; as you are on the spot, and well acquainted with the nature of this Business, I have directed him to apply to you. When you are joined by General Jones of Halifax, with his Brigade perhaps you may spare some of your men; if not, you may, if you approve of it, allow him as many as you may think proper of the Militia, making this Service, if well performed, a Tour of Duty.

Inclosed is a Duplicate of a Letter I sent you Yesterday, least any Accident should happen to the other.

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Ordered that the following be made out and sent Mr. George Fletcher, Cross Creek:

Sir:

You are hereby authorized and impowered to receive from Mr. Daniel Mallett, late Commissary at Cross Creek, all the Stores in his possession belonging to this State.

I am informed that you have supplied the Troops at Cross Creek from the time Mr. Mallett resigned his Office. You will therefore continue to act as Commissary for that Department.

From the Situation we are in, and the Necessity of procuring Supplies for the Army without Delay, I desire that you will lose no Time in procuring them, or the Soldiers will be obliged to carve for themselves, which must be avoided if possible.

You will try to purchase from the Farmers, but if they will not sell you must then seize both Provisions for the men and Forage for the Horse.

Be careful to comply, as near as you can, with the act of Assembly, both as to the Quantity you take and the Certificates you give. You will inform me from time to Time how you proceed.

———

Sunday, 24th September.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Mr. George Fletcher:

Sir:

I understand that there is a Quantity of public Salt at Cambleton. You will apply to the proper person, in whose Care the Salt is, and load three Waggons with that Article.

Mr. Raiford writes that about Ten Waggon Loads of Powder and Lead are at the same place, belonging to the Publick. Two Waggons must be loaded with Ammunition. Observe to send what Cartouch Boxes you have, not exceeding Twelve Hundred, notwithstanding the above requisition.

Ordered that the following be made and sent Brig. Genl. Butler:

Sir:

Two men from Wake County, under the Command of Captain Bryant, in your Brigade, who left the Camp before you marched

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from this place, appeared sorry for their Behaviour. They say they left their Guns at the Camp. Their Names are Frederick Massey and Dempsey Jurdon.

I have given them a pass to you, and promised that, if they behave well for the residue of their time, that you will not take any Advantage of them on account of their Desertion.

William Rich and Francis Ballard have deserted from Salisbury. They say their Officers left them. They have agreed to return. As they do it cheerfully, enquire into their cause and give them all the Intelligence you can, as they seem ignorant.

Ordered that Copies of the Following be made out and sent to the Commanding Officer of the Counties of Johnston, Wake, Orange, Granville, Halifax, Chatham, Caswell, Guilford, Warren, Franklin and Mecklenburg, respectively.

“Sir,

I desire that you would have Returns made to you of all the Waggons in your County. This may be done by writing to the different Captains, or in any way you please, and then form them into Brigades. It will be a good way to let those nearest together form a Brigade; they can, when thus formed, be called out by Rotation.

Unless some plan or other of this nature is adopted, we shall have complaints without End. I could wish to recommend it to you to have this Business done immediately. Whenever a smaller Number of Waggons than a brigade are wanting, indulge those who are least able to send their Grain or perform the necessary Business of their plantations, as payment to them for their Waggons will not be a Compensation for the loss of a Crop. I shall be glad to hear from you as soon as possible. If we do not find the Soldiers, they will be under the disagreeable necessity of getting Supplies at the Point of the Bayonet, which must be avoided. A Brigade may consist of from six to twelve Waggons.”

-------------------- page 394 --------------------

Monday, 25th September, 1780.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Nicholas Long, Esq.:

Sir:

Inclosed is a copy of a considerable number of Letters that have been sent to the Colonels or Commanding Officers of different Counties. As we are like to have the Army to provide for for some time, I wish to fall upon a plan by which Waggons can be called out by rotation. Those that are convenient to Grain should be imployed in conveying it to such places where it may be wanted; others to transport the public Stores from Cross Creek and elsewhere. This Business properly belongs to your Department, tho' I am under the Necessity of engaging in it. You have a List of the Letters sent; if you approve of the mode, send others to such Counties you may as are omitted. It is absolutely necessary for you to be at this place for some time, until our affairs are put under proper Regulations. The Deputies under you are without money, and almost without Credit. The Business requires some Money. You will, therefore, lose no time in getting here. The alternative is certain, that if we do not feed the Army the soldiers will provide for themselves at the point of the Bayonet, which must be avoided. It will be proper to send on all the Cartouch Boxes you have at Halifax, also the Arms; let Boxes be made for them, as those sent loose are much damaged.

Ordered that the following be made out and handed the Honb'l Major G'l Gates:

Sir:

Colonel Thackston informs me that there ought to be a strong Guard to go with the Arms and Ammunition to Guilford. I have no person to employ on this Service except a few Volunteers; but there being only seven, their Officers wish to wait a day or two, under an Expectation of being joined by more of the Company. Will not the Virginia Light Horse, under the Command of Captain Smith, answer for an Escort? And I beg leave to submit to your Consideration the propriety of sending on the Virginians to join our Troops, in order to protect the Country from

-------------------- page 395 --------------------
the plundering parties of the enemy; their presence must give Spirits to our Citizens.

An order issued for two guns, for the use of a Couple of the Militia of Wake County, now on their way to Camp.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Colonel Thomas Polk, Commissary:

Sir:

I expect you will soon have a large number of Troops to provide for in your Quarter. Do let me entreat you to exert your self in providing Supplies for the men and Forage for the Horse. General Smallwood and the Light Horse under the Command of Colonel White will set off soon. The General will take the Command of our Militia. General Gates expects a Reinforcement from Virginia and Maryland of Four Thousand Men. Can you be able to find Supplies for such an Army? I do greatly depend on your Industry and Zeal, but unless Magazines can be laid up before the Frost sets in, I must fear the Consequences. I have wrote to the Colonels in each County this way, to direct the Cap tains to make returns to him of all the waggons in each Company; then to class them in proper Brigades, in order that each may be called into duty by rotation. Unless some method is adopted for this purpose, we shall have complaints without End. Your experience is greater in this Business, and your Industry equal to any Man's. General Butler is on his march with his Brigade. The Virginians from Guilford Court House will move. I never have received a single line from you. Do write to the Board as soon as you can.

———


Tuesday, 26th September, 1780.
&
Wednesday, 27th September, 1780.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Governor Nash:

Sir:

The enclosed came this day to hand, directed to you. I have had them copied and send you the original.

-------------------- page 396 --------------------

General Gates has informed me that he expects the French Fleet will soon be at the Southward to co-operate with the Army under his Command; perhaps they will go to Charlestown. He expects to march from this place through Chatham, then by Cole's Bridge to Peedee, then down the River to the last Crossing place for George Town, and has applied for Magazines of Provisions to be laid up at proper places on that Route.

As I am alone, (my Colleagues having gone home in a few days after you left us,) I should be obliged to ride up without loss of Time. I wish to advise with you on Matters of Importance. I am sure vigorous and decisive Measures must be adopted. I have done, and still am willing to do, every thing in my power for the Interest of my Country, as I prefer answering for my Conduct after we have beaten the Enemy to any Indulgence I might expect from them.

———


Thursday, 28th September, 1780.

An order given Colonel Exum, Wayne, for 44 Guns, 25lb Powder and 60lb Lead, for the use of his Regiment, now on their way to Camp.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Colonel Hinton, Wake:

Sir:

I shall be obliged to you to engage as many Waggons as you can, and send them on to this place, loaded with wheat or Corn for the use of the Army here. This neighborhood has been exhausted in a great degree, and the Army will suffer unless Supplies can be had from the other Counties. I have wrote to the Colonel of each County to order the Captains to make returns to him of all the Waggons in each Company, in order that they may be formed into Brigades to do Duty by Rotation. I sent you a Letter on this Subject several days ago. If you have appointed a Commissioner in your County to take Care of the Grain Tax, desire him to send all the wheat, &c., he can. He must give a certificate for any he takes. The Waggons thus employed will be paid a very high price.

-------------------- page 397 --------------------

Captain Martin of South Carolina has a Waggon in which he brought a part of his Fortune when forced to leave his Country; I should think it hard if his Waggon was taken from him against his consent, as he is entitled to Hospitality when with us; he is so obliging as to declare his willingness in having his employed to convey Grain to this place, but not to be sent greater distances. Let me hear from you as soon as possible.


19th September.

Received a letter from General Davidson, relative to the Enemy's situation, Intention of invading this State, &c. Filed No. 8.

Received a Letter from General Harrington, relative to Military Matters, enclosing a List of Military Stores at Cross Creek, &c. Filed No. 9.

Received a letter from General Butler, relative to Cartouch Boxes, Salt, &c. Filed No. 9.

———


Friday, 29th September, 1790.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent his Excellency, Governor Nash:

Sir:

By Express last night the Enemy are in Mecklenburg, General Butler retreating but Skirmishing. I went immediately to General Gates and called upon him for Assistance. I mentioned all the Troops that had Shoes ought to go from this place, and desired that Colonel Morgan, should go with General Smallwood. The General was to consult his Officers this morning. I have no doubt but it will be agreeable to them, and that Four Hundred at least will start. I shall hurry them all I can. We have no other news.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Colonel Robert Burton, Granville.

Sir:

Colo. Martin will be here in two days. I wish to imploy you as Commissary Genl.; do come up without loss of time. I should have wrote to you on this Subject before, but I was alone and properly could not make the Appointment. I have waited as long as I have Patience. I have written to the Colonels of the neighbouring

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Counties to have returns made by the Captains of all the Waggons in their Companys, in order to form them into Brigades, and then they can do duty by rotation. Pray tell Colonel Satterwhite I wish he would send all the Grain he can to this place; the Troops are in want. (I have heard he is appointed Commissary for Granville.) The Enemy are in Mecklenburg. General Butler is retreating. I expect General Smallwood and Colonel Morgan of Virginia will march with about 400 of the Troops here; I have called upon General Gates for Aid. I have so much Business on my hands that I cannot act as I wish.

P. S. Since writing the above I understand that there were three or four Waggons, under the Direction of D. Dozier, seen at Lamb's in Virginia, loaded with Shoes and other Cloathing for the Regular Soldiers in the Maryland Line; as they have not crossed at Taylor's Ferry, nor been heard of since they were at Lambs nine days ago, they must have gone to Halifax. I must request you will apply to Colonel Satterwhite to send to Halifax two or three Waggons for these articles, as the Troops are to move the Instant they are shod, and our Friends in Salisbury are in the greatest Distress. Our People will lose all Spirits unless they are supported. If Colonel Satterwhite will not, let me to entreat you to exert yourself and have this Cloathing sent on immediately.

Received a Letter from Thomas Person, Esquire, relative to the appointing a Commissioner in Granville, the Governor's departure from thence, &c. Filed No. 10.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Brigadier General Butler:

Sir:

The Enemy are in Mecklenburg County. General Sumner has retreated. I wish you to exert yourself in preparing your Arms for Action. I have sent an express to hurry on the Cartouch Boxes. As soon as they get to this place they shall be sent to you, but it will be prudent for you to be preparing an Expedient for Cartouch Boxes, for fear of a disappointment.

I am pleased in telling you that General Smallwood and Colonel Morgan will be in motion shortly. They intend to join General Sumner. Smallwood will command our Militia. The Regulars will take the Field as soon as they get Shoes, which will be

-------------------- page 399 --------------------
in a few days, as there are a considerable number now on the road in this State, sent from Maryland.

I wish you to move as soon as you can, as it will give spirits to our Western Friends. The Virginians from Guilford are ordered on. You may rely on what I tell you, all these Troops will march shortly—500 as soon as they can—in a day or two more at least. I will send salt with the Cartouch Boxes. If they don't come in a little time I will send the Salt on.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Brigadier General Harrington.

Sir:

Your two Letters of the 24th and 25th came to Hand last night. As I am not acquainted with the Custom of exchanging raw Hides for tanned Leather, I shall leave that matter to you, and request you will give such Directions as you think best for the Hides with you. I have just got a supply of Leather for the present, tho' I foresee we shall have Occasion for all that can be got, as it is probable the Hides may be damaged in carrying them from this place to Cross Creek. I shall have them exchanged or tanned here. I approve of the orders you have given Colonels Taylor and Brown, and think your Design a good one, if you find it practicable to prevent the Enemy from destroying the Mills on Pedee and carrying off the plunder they have taken. A vigorous Attempt in the Quarter you mention may be productive of much good. Your good sense will direct you on this Occasion. I have not heard from Halifax lately, but hope that part, if not all, of General Jones' Brigade are on their march to join you, as I desired it might be done without loss of time several days ago. The condition of the men you mention is rather hard, arising from the neglect of the Officers. If you cannot make better Terms, it may be prudent to agree to their serving the Time you mention, which is three months after they got to Cross Creek. I shall pay particular Attention to the men in Gaol, and do you all the service in my power towards recovering your slaves. I have procured Four Hundred and Fifty Dollars, which I send you by the Bearer, also some Medicine.

An order given John Philyan for 4 guns, five Cartouch Boxes and Ten rounds of Cartridge.

-------------------- page 400 --------------------

Charles McGill and Samuel Runnels, two of the Militia, furnished with Arms.

———


Saturday, 30th September, 1780.

Received a letter from Colonel Mial Scurlock, Chatham, relative to the Invalids at that place. Filed No. 11.

Ordered that the following be made out and handed Colonel Morgan:

Sir:

At the request of the Assembly General Smallwood has agreed to take the Command of the Militia of this State, and will set off in a day or two to the Back Country. It would afford me great pleasure for you to accompany the General. Colonel Morgan's Character as a Soldier is well known in America. I am persuaded your presence would give Spirits to my Countrymen. General Small wood I expect will have an opportunity of finding Employment suitable to a man of your Rank and Gallantry.

Received from General Butler a Letter relative to Cartouch Boxes, &c. Filed No 12.

———


Sunday, 1st October, 1780.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Colonel Mial Scurlock, Chatham:

Sir:

Your favour I received last night; it is not in my power to provide the things you want for the Soldiers left with you by General Sumner, but as they are near to General Harrington, would it not be a good way for those that are able to join him at Cross Creek. They might be able to act as Guard there and strengthen the Post.

Those that are reduced so low by sickness that you think will not be able to do any service before their time expired had better be discharged. I have written to General Harrington on this Subject which you will be so obliging as to send on, if any of the men go to Cross Creek.

-------------------- page 401 --------------------

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Brigadier General Sumner:

Sir:

General Gates has written to you on the subject of Military Operations as Commander-in-Chief. It is highly proper that his Orders be obeyed. He has shown me his Letters to you, which makes it unnecessary for me to add more than that I am respectfully yours.

Received a Letter from General Butler on the Subject of Shoes, Leather, &c., for the Army. Filed No. 13.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Brigadier General Harrington:

Sir:

General Gates will give you Directions how to act relative to your Military Operations: as he Knows how to direct matters of this kind better than I do, you will be pleased to obey his directions. Colonel Scurlock in Chatham informs me that General Sumner left some Militia in that County; they are mostly unable to do do duty; I have wrote to him to discharge those that are so low as not to be soon in a Condition to march, the others to be sent to Cross Creek to act as a Guard, but to be subject to such orders as you may give.

———


Monday, 2nd October, 1780.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Brigadier General Smallwood:

Sir:

Your accepting the Command of the Militia of this State, in Consequence of the Request of the General Assembly, has given me great pleasure, and I believe will be no less pleasing to my Countrymen; your Character as a Soldier is highly respected, while your Behaviour as a Gentleman is engaging. I have written to the Officers belonging to North Carolina, informing them of your Appointment and directing them to pay Obedience to your Orders as their Commanding Officer. I flatter myself that my Countrymen will exert themselves to render your Command both agreeable as well as honorable, that it may be so it is the sincere Wish of, &c.

-------------------- page 402 --------------------

Ordered that Copies of the Following be made out and sent Generals Sumner, Butler, Davidson and Gregory:

Sir:

General Smallwood has accepted the Command of the Militia of this State, in Consequence of an application made to him by the Assembly. You are therefore to look upon him as your Superior Officer, and, of course, are accountable to him for your Conduct. It is with pleasure that I give you this Information, as I have a high opinion of the General as a Soldier and a Gentleman, and make no doubt but that you, Sir, as well as the other Officers belonging to this Country, will do all you can to make this Command pleasing to the General as well as honorable to yourselves.

Received a Letter from General Sumner relative to the Movements and Operations of the Enemy. Filed No. 14.

An order given Captain Francis Pugh of the Militia for 17 Guns, 4 rounds of Cartridges, Flints, &c.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Brig'r General Sumner:

Sir:

Your favour of the 29th Ultimo I this moment received, and am glad to hear that the Inhabitants are turning out with Spirit. General Smallwood and Colonel Morgan will undoubtedly leave this place To-morrow Morning with a number of regular Troops. The former is to take Command of the Militia of this State. I shall endeavour to send you some Cloathing for the Regular Troops you mention. I have wrote to Colonel Long to come up, in order to be informed what Cloaths the State has a Right to.

I am at a loss how to advise you to act with the Militia Men you mention, not knowing what their Complaint is. However, I would advise you to fix a Time with them, on the best terms you can, provided the enemy leave the State, or until we can call out a reinforcement.

Received a Letter from Mr. John Ramsey. Filed No. 13.

-------------------- page 403 --------------------

Tuesday, 3rd October, & Wednesday, 4th October.

Colonel Martin appeared and again took his Seat at the Board.

Robert Burton, Esquire, Granville, appointed Superintendent and Commissary of the Districts of Hillsborough and Halifax.

Thomas and John Scarlet, now confined in Gaol as Delinquents within the meaning of the Militia Law, ordered to be discharged on their enrolling themselves in the Continental Army.

An Order given Mr. Ramsey, Chatham, for Twenty-five Bushels Salt for the use of the Publick.

An Order given John Wilcox, Chatham, for Twenty-five Bushels Salt, for the use of those at his forge in public Service.

John Brandon, jun'r, appointed Iss'g Commissary at Salisbury.

———


Thursday, 5th October.

Received a Letter from General Sumner relative to the movement, &c., of the Enemy. Filed No. 15.


2nd October.

Received a Letter from General Harrington relative to Military Matters, Shoe Leather, &c. Filed No. 16.


1st October.

Received a Letter from Colonel Benj. A. Sewell, relative to his Regiment, &c. Filed No. 17.


2nd October.

Received a Letter from Colonel John Paisley on Military Affairs. Filed No. 18.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Brigad. Genl. Sumner:

Sir:

The act of the Assembly is sent to New Berne to be printed. The purport of the Law you want is, that the Militia shall serve three months from the time they were at Head Quarters, not reckoning the Time they were absent from their Regiments since the

-------------------- page 404 --------------------
defeat. Those men that are refractory ought to be informed that they must be obedient to the Laws of their Country. The Board have written to Colonel Polk to furnish you with provisions. He is desired to exert himself, and to appoint as many Assistants as he thinks necessary. You will call on him without delay. General Smallwood and Colonel Morgan will set off to-morrow with a number of regular Troops to join you. The Badness of the Weather has retarded them for two days.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Brigadier General Jones:

Sir:

The Board, having received information from General Sumner this morning of the Disposition of the Enemy, of their main Body being posted at Charlotte and a Detachment of them marching up the Catawba to intercept McDowell, Cleveland and others on their march after Ferguson, are of opinion that a favourable opportunity is left for the operation of our Troops against them; that you change your Route and march the shortest and most convenient way to join General Sumner at the Yadkin River. General Smallwood marches To-morrow with the Light Infantry, of the Maryland Troops, who, agreeable to the request of the Assembly, hath accepted the Command of our Militia; when you join him you will therefore please to consider yourself under his immediate Command. The Enemy's Force is said to be inconsiderable, and their Intentions appear to Collect Provisions and Forage, thereby to destroy our Resources, which by the junction of our Troops would be prevented. The main Body of the Regular Troops at this place will march as soon as a few necessaries can be procured for them. We are informed from General Gates of a large Body of Troops from Virginia and Maryland which will reinforce us by the 25th of this Month. The different Troops under Sumner are said to be 3,000; with these others you will be well supported.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent the Honorable, the Delegates of this State in Congress:

Gentlemen:

The Board of War have been informed that Captain Reed, of the first Regiment of the Continental Troops belonging to this

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State, purchased a considerable Quantity of Cloathing for our Troops, and that the Cloaths are now in Philadelphia. We wish to inform you that if they cannot be sent to our Prisoners in South Carolina, they are much wanted this way. We have some regular Troops now in Camp, almost naked. You will be so obliging as to enquire into this matter. The Enemy are in Force in Mecklenburg; they have been collecting Supplies of Provisions for some time. General Summer has retreated to this side the Yadkin; his light Horse and the Light Infantry are about Eighteen Miles from Salisbury; the Enemy seem unwilling to Skirmish. We are not informed what Force the Enemy have, nor have we a return of the Troops under Summer, tho' we suppose he has about 2,000. General Butler will join him in a day or two with about seven Hundred. General Jones is on his march from Halifax with his Brigade, we hear about six hundred. Returns are expected every day of our numbers.

General Smallwood and Colonel Morgan, with two Hundred Regulars, will leave this place to-morrow. The General takes the Command of the Militia of this State; he has been detained for some days in order to get the Regulars equipped. Will it not be a good way for Congress to make Morgan a Brigadier General? His long Service and Rank will make it exceedingly irksome to him to be commanded by our Brigadiers.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Colonel Thomas Polk.

Sir:

The Board are very sorry to inform you that they have received a number of Complaints from General Sumner and the Troops under his Command of the want of Provisions. Your Character for Industry and Patriotism gave us hopes that you would have been able to have procured Supplies for the Army. If you have not Assistants enough, employ as many as are necessary. You know Sir, that if we do not feed the Soldiers they must take care of themselves, and will do it at the point of the Bayonet. This must be avoided if possible.

General Smallwood and Colonel Morgan will set off To-morrow with a body of regular Troops; they have been detained by the Badness of the Weather for a few days past.

-------------------- page 406 --------------------

Friday, 6th October, 1780.

Received a Letter from George Fletcher, Commissary, relative to Salt, &c. Filed No. 19.


October 2d.

Received a Letter from General Sumner relative to Military Matters. Filed No 20.


October 2d.

Received a letter from Peter Mallett, Esqr., relative to Salt brought in the public Waggon from Cross Creek to this place, claimed by said Mallett as his property. Filed No. 21.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Peter Mallett, Esqr.:

Sir:

In answer to yours of this date, the Board cannot conceive upon what principle of Justice you claim the Salt brought by the public Waggons from Cross Creek; if you have had yours employed in the service of this State or the United States, you are intitled to the allowance made by Congress or the act of Assembly, as the service may require; but we can by no means consent that public or private Waggons should be employed in transporting private Property at this Time. The Board received a Letter last night from Mr. George Fletcher by the Waggon Master; he says that the salt belongs to the United States, and that it was sent by him; but should it hereafter appear that it was your property, the Board will order the like Quantity to be delivered to your Agent at Cross Creek.

———


Saturday, 7th October, 1780.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent his Excellency, Governor Nash.:

Sir:

The Board have called upon Genl. Sumner for a Return of the Militia under his Command,—the Number and when their Service expires,—which when received will be transmitted to you with such Advice for further Aids as the Service will demand. The

-------------------- page 407 --------------------
Board hear little of the second Drafts from Edenton and New Bern Districts. About Two Hundred with the Refugees, have only joined General Gregory, a Number far inadequate to their proportion. The Board recommend that your Excellency would please to call upon the Commanding Officer in the Counties of those Districts for their respective Quotas already drafted; that they have them marched on immediately, and serve out their time agreeable to the Resolve of the General Assembly. This Force, when joined with General Sumner, would be respectable, and would relieve in a great measure the Western Militia, who are doing constant duty; should your Excellency's Commands not have their Effect, the Board will be under the necessity of applying to you for another Aid of Militia from those Distrlcts.

Inclosed you have sundry Letters from the Westward, which show our Affairs would soon wear a good Face, with proper Exertion and support. The Board stand in great need of money for Contingencies, please to Favour them with some the first opportunity; our necessities are very pressing. Every Intelligence of Importance shall be conveyed to you with all possible Dispatch.

P. S. Since the Sealing of our last Dispatches to your Excellency we have received undoubted Intelligence of Governor Martin's being at Charlotte, signing Paroles and Resolutions to the Inhabitants of Mecklenburg, one of which General Gates has shewn us, signed as Governor of North Carolina. Lord Cornwallis hath issued a proclamation inviting the Inhabitants to come in and surrender their Arms; they then may return Home and receive Provisions, with other flattering Promises. These are Artifices they practiced on the Inhabitants of South Carolina, but we flatter ourselves they will have little Effect on our People.

The Board would be very much pleased with a nearer vicinity of your Excellency and the Council, if possible to obtain it, that with our united Efforts you might frustrate the insidious Designs of your Competitor in this Government; but this is submitted to you. General Smallwood's Corps of Light Infantry marched off this day, consisting of Two Hundred Men. Colonel Morgan, the famous Partisan, attends General Smallwood, and will command a Body of Riflemen, from whom we expect the Enemy will be greatly harrassed. The Intelligence received from Augusta seems, by fresh Advices, to be premature.

-------------------- page 408 --------------------

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Colonel Williams, Caswell:

Sir:

Mr. Henry Black hath this day waited on the Board and informs them he hath a Quantity of Provision on Hand, already collected, agreeable to his former appointment. As your appointment of County Commissioner supersedes his, you will receive from him all Provision and Forage he hath on Hand, and transmit the same immediately to Camp. Mr. Black seems to be an active person, and may answer the End of one of your Assistants, and perhaps may, from his experience, be well employed in your Service.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Colonel Hinton, Wake:

Sir:

Your Favour this day received, and am sorry to hear that you have so few Waggons in your County. The Board must entreat you to exert yourself in having as much Grain collected as possible; the Waggons and Carts should be employed in carrying the Grain to one place, as near this as you can. Be so good as to press the Commissioners to send forward all the Cattle they can; this Army here has been three days without Meat. Ask Colonel Wooten to write to the Board as often as he can; he must be as industrious as ever man was, or the Soldiers will be under the Necessity of carving for themselves, which must be avoided. We want Beef and Wheat; the Beef should be sent on immediately.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Mr. John Rice, Assistant Quarter Master:

Sir:

You are diligently to make Enquiry for all Waggons and Horses supposed to lossed, belonging to the Division of Militia under the Command of Major General Caswell, as also the Continental Army; and them having found to take into your immediate possession, and make a Return thereof to the Board of War. You are likewise to collect all Guns belonging to the Army, where they have traded or bartered away by the Soldiery, wheresoever they may be found. All Waggons and Guns wanting repair are to be transmitted to Hillsborough.

-------------------- page 409 --------------------

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Colonel Robert Burton, Granville:

Sir: Since I wrote to you by Colonel Williams, General Smallwood hath shewn me a Letter from Colonel Carrington, mentioning that there are several Waggon Loads of Cloathing for the Maryland Line at Taylor's Ferry. I have promised the General to have them brought on without delay, as the Regulars will march as soon as they are equipped. We request you will procure Waggons as soon as you can. All the Stores from Petersburg will be brought to Roanoke, where we must send for them. You need not send to Petersburg. The Board request that you will write to Mr. Nash, and, indeed, imploy any others that you think proper to collect Beef. The Army have had no Meat for three days. You will see the necessity of exerting yourself; do therefore give Directions to those you appoint in the different Counties to conform, as nearly as they can, to the Act of Assembly. If the People will not sell their Cattle you must take them, having regard to the Quantity you take from each man. Let it be on some equitable Rule. Once we can begin and set our Wheels in motion the Work will be easy.

Captain William Dent, of Guilford County, appointed Issuing Commissary at the Court House thereof.


2d October.

Opened a letter from James Williams, Camp, to Governor Nash. Copy filed No. 22.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Brig'r Gen'l Benbury:

Sir:

As the army stands in great need of Provisions, and the supplies, as pointed out by act of Assembly, to be procured come in but very slow, the Board of War, anxious to relieve their wants, which are pressing, to prevent Ravages and Depredation, take the liberty to address you on this Subject; that you will please to call on all the County Commissioners in your District for all the Grain and Flour they have on Hand, and direct them to transport the same to Halifax, by Water or otherwise, in the most expeditious manner, and the Cattle to be drove up immediately to this place; that they be very diligent in procuring further supplies

-------------------- page 410 --------------------
until the Collection of the Specific Tax, which Tax, when collected, we flatter ourselves will be sufficient to sustain the Army without much further Trouble.

The Board look up to Edenton District in this Critical Juncture for provision Supplies from its great Resources in this Article, and desire a proper person of Activity and Integrity be recommended by you to be appointed a Superintendent Commissary of that District, who will make it his Business to have the Provisions from the Counties thereof collected at such places from whence with ease he may send them to Halifax, to be delivered to Colonel Burton or his Agent, who is Superintendent Commissary for that District. You will please to order the Commanding Officers of the Counties of your District to make a return to you of Waggons and Teams fit for Service in the Same, which please to transmit to the Board. Twelve are immediately wanted, which will form Two Brigades, to transport Provisions and other Articles from Halifax to this place. Those Waggons will perform their Tour of Duty in Routine, then be discharged. The Enemy are in force at Charlotte; are collecting Provisions and Forage, thereby destroying our Resources there. General Sumner is weak at present. General Gregory has but Two Hundred of the Edenton Drafts with him—far inadequate to the proportion of men of the second Draft from that District. You will therefore spur up the Commanding Officers to collect them; otherwise the whole Militia must soon march. General Smallwood sets out to-day with Two Hundred Light Infantry of his Corps, who has accepted the Command of our Militia, with the famous Partisan, Colonel Morgan. From these officers much is expected. Colonel Washington arrived this day from Halifax with about one Hundred Continental Horse; Sets off for Head Quarters at the Yadkin To-morrow.

General Gates, as soon as the main Body of Regulars is equipped, will follow. The Force remaining here, near one Thousand, are greatly distressed for Cloathing and other Necessaries—particularly Provisions. In this last Article you must relieve them.

Governor Martin is at Charlotte, issuing Protections and Parols to the Inhabitants as Governor. We hope to have him soon dislodged, with proper Exertion and Support.

-------------------- page 411 --------------------

Ordered that the following be made out and handed the Honourable Major General Gates:

Sir:

Mr. Mallett claims the Salt that was brought Two days ago from Cross Creek in public Waggons. Mr. George Fletcher wrote to us that the Salt belongs to the United States, and was sent by him. He acts as Commissary at Cross Creek. The Board has written to Mr. Mallett that we can by no means consent that private property should be transported in public Waggons, or that the Waggons of the Inhabitants, impressed by us, should be imployed for private purposes. If Mr. Mallett has had Waggons in the Service of this State, or the United States, he must be contented with receiving what is paid to others. The Board has also engaged to Mr. Mallett that if his Agent has sent any Salt belonging to him in public waggons, that the like Quantity shall be delivered to his agent.

The Salt was received and stored by the public officers by proper Authority. You will therefore judge of the propriety of paying Mr. Mallett for the Salt under these Circumstances.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Brigr. General Sumner:

Sir:

The Board of War think it absolutely necessary that regular Returns should be made to them in order to judge of the propriety of calling out other Divisions of the Militia to reinforce the Army. You will therefore, without delay, have returns of the Troops under your command. We wish to know the number that was called out in the first Draft. Indeed, it would be proper to inform us how many men have turned out from the different Counties, as the Board is desirous to do Justice in calling out the Militia; they wish, therefore, to be well informed as to the Troops now under you. We have sent you a second Letter to Colonel Polk on the Subject of procuring Supplies; you will also press him on this Head. If you cannot do better, discharge the men that have been Three Months in actual Service, if they continue troublesome.

Colonel Morgan, with upwards of Two Hundred Regulars, left

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us this day. General Smallwood will set out in the morning; he is very unwell.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent George Fletcher, Commissary:

Sir:

The Army at this Post is greatly distressed for want of Beef. The Board request that you will exert yourself in Collecting all the Beef Cattle in your power, and send them on without delay. You will apply to the Commanding Officer at Cross Creek to afford you such aid as you may stand in need of. Your Character for Industry and Zeal gives us Hopes that you will be able to do something clever.

The Board will be glad to hear from you as soon as you can. We have no money at present to send you, but hope to be able to get some before long.

You must have a sufficient number of men employed to collect and drive the Cattle, which must be obtained either from the Commanding Officer of the Troops or from the Colonel of the County. You must impress Cattle if the Inhabitants will not sell; but great care must be used to comply with the act of Assembly as nearly as you can.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Colonel Thomas Brown, Bladen:

Sir:

As it is some time since you received his Excellency's Orders to march with Force and collect all the Cattle and other Provisions necessary for the Army in the vicinity of the Peedee, to prevent their falling into the Enemy's Hands, it is presumed by the Board of War by this time you have made some considerable Collections from that Quarter, particularly of Cattle, of which the Army at present stand in great need. You will therefore order on all the Cattle you have on hand to this Post, except such necessary for the Subsistence of your own Troops, with the utmost Expedition. In the meanwhile you will still continue to discharge the several duties enjoined you by the Governor, which, from your known zeal and Activity in the cause of your Country, the Board are very sensible you will be very attentive to. You will therefore make us a Return of such Provisions you shall occasionally collect as opportunity serves.

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Sunday, 8th October, 1780.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Colonel James Kenan, Duplin:

Sir:

As the Army at this place stand in great need of Provisions at present, particularly Cattle, the Board of War addresses this subject to you, that you will please to call on the County Commissioners for provision Supplies, if there is one appointed by the Justices of your County, for all the Cattle he hath on Hand, and that he have them immediately drove to this post. If there is none appointed, have five Justices summoned by the Sheriff to appoint one; and, agreeable to the Directions of the Act of Assembly in that case, he must, without delay, purchase or impress Provisions, and grant Certificates for the same, until the Collection of the Specific Tax takes place. We flatter ourselves that you have or will accept this appointment; from your known zeal and Activity in the service of your own Country, your undertaking this service will be very agreeable to the Board. We once more impress on your mind the immediate Necessity of having Cattle sent on, and your ordering proper persons and Guards to attend the Commissioners on this Service.

An order given Andrew Mallory for nineteen Guns, with Bayonets, Ammunition, &c., for the use of Company of Militia, Wake.

An order given Captain Singleton for Fifty-Six pair of Shoes for his Company.

An Order Issued in favour of Capt. Barrett, of the Cavalry, for Leather for a Belt.

James Taylor and James Hughes, two of the Militia Horsemen from Orange County, excused from going to Camp, on their Assisting the Commissioner of said County in collecting and driving Beef Cattle during the Time for which they were enlisted.

An Order issued (on Application of Doctor Brown, Director Gen'l) to the Quarter Master to prepare the church as a hospital for the Reception of the Sick at this Post.

An Order given Captain Williams for 1 lb. Powder, 4 lbs. Lead and 17 Flints for the use of his Comp'y of Militia, Beaufort.

-------------------- page 414 --------------------

2d October.

Received a Letter from General Sumner, containing Intelligence of the Operations of the Enemy, &c., enclosing the Deposition of Prisoners, &c. Filed No. 23.

———


Monday, October 9th.

An Order given John Richards, Collier (in the Employ of the Publick,) for one Bushel Salt.

A Request made Colonel Williams, of the Maryland Line, to furnish Mr. John Taylor with Fatigue Parties to assist in gathering Corn.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Colonel Wooten, Wake:

Sir:

The Distresses of the Army at this place for Provisions induce the Board to call on you and request that you, with all possible Expedition, forward to this Post all the Beef Cattle in your possession; and that you will likewise call on the Commissioner of your County and cause him immediately to send up all the Provisions he may have collected; and that he continue, with the greatest Industry, to procure Provisions until the Time of collecting the Specific Tax, which collection, when made, we flatter ourselves will be sufficient to sustain the Army without much further Trouble.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Mr. John Rice, Chatham:

Sir:

As a number of Waggons and Teams must be employed in passing and repassing to and from Cross Creek in the public Service to this Post, it is absolutely necessary that you have Forage laid up at some Half-way Stage between Hillsborough and Cross Creek, that the Waggons be not delayed and the Inhabitants not distressed with them. Mr. Hinton's is said to be a very proper place. If Mr. Hinton will undertake to issue it he will have our approbation, or any other person you will agree with.

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October 9th.

Received a Letter from Mr. Thomas Amis on the subject of his being commissioned to collect Cattle, &c. Filed No. 24.

Read a petition from Thomas Amis setting forth the Inconveniences to which he is subjected by being driven from his Habitation by the Enemy, praying, &c. Filed No. 25.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Thomas Amis:

Sir:

As the Legislature have pointed out a particular mode of collecting Provisions by appointing County Commissioners, the Board cannot at present, tho' it is their wish, employ you in the manner you point out. Colonel Brown has a particular Command to collect Cattle on the Peedee and its Vicinage; should you join him with some men, it will be agreeable to us, and superintend the Collection of Cattle when made, and have them sent to this or any other Post. From your former Zeal and Activity, the Board would readily accept any Service consistent and agreeable to you to perform.

Ordered that a Protection for Mr. Amis's Waggons, while employed in removing his family, &c., out of the way of the Enemy, be enclosed and sent with the above.

———


Tuesday, 10th October.

The British and Tory Prisoners sent off under Guard by Captain John Smith, the former to Virginia, the latter to Halifax.

An Order issued for a Bar of Steel, for the Use of the Armourors at this place.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Colonel Satterwhite, Granville:

Sir:

Captain John Smith, the bearer of this, has Charge of all the Prisoners at this place. The British he will march to Virginia; the Tory Prisoners he hath the Directions of the Board of War to deliver to you, which you will please to receive, and with a safe Guard conduct to Halifax.

-------------------- page 416 --------------------

Ordered that the Waggon Master furnish Captain Smith with a Waggon and Team to attend him on this service.

An Order given Captain John Smith for Forty-Six Guns, with Bayonets, for the Guard on the above Service.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Colonel Edward Carrington, Virga.:

Sir:

Captain Smith, who hath charge of the British Prisoners, will discharge the Waggon and Team attending him at Roanoke. You will please to load the Waggon back with such Stores as are immediately wanting for the Army, which can assist those you may have Ordered to this place.

Received a Letter from General Davidson, relative to the Military operations to the West, &c. Filed No. 26.

Received a Letter from Thomas Polk, Esq., relative to Transactions in the Commissary Department. Filed No. 27.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Colonel Thomas Polk:

Sir:

Yours of the 6th Instant this day came to Hand. I expect you have before this received a Letter from the Board informing you of the Complaints made for Want of Provision, and a power to you to appoint as many assistants as you thought necessary in the different Counties. The Board are satisfied, from the Reasons you give, of the propriety of your appointing Officers to Collect Supplies for the Army, and have no doubt that they will also be satisfactory to your Countrymen at large. Vigorous and decisive measures alone can save us. Our Situation demands the Exertion of all that have Souls capable of aspiring after Liberty. From your Zeal and Attachment to our cause, the Board expect great things from you.

You will endeavor to conform as nearly as you can to the mode prescribed by Act of Assembly in procuring provision Supplies, as well as Forage, though we do not mean to fetter you on this Occasion. Remember that you are a Citizen of North Carolina, and that your first duty is to save your Country. If we do not feed the Army, they must provide for themselves or be disbanded. The Consequences will be too dreadful to mention.

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The Board will do every Thing in their power to hasten the March of the Regulars here, in order to join the Army with you, and will themselves go to the Westward as soon as it can be done.

We wish to remind you of the absolute necessity of laying up Provisions whilst the Weather will permit, least when the Frost sets in we shall have nothing beforehand. The Distresses will be great should such an Event take place. You will consult General Smallwood as to the proper places of laying up Magazines.

Received a Letter from General Sumner, relative to the supposed intentions of the Enemy. Filed No. 28.

Received a Letter from Colonel Philip Taylor, on the same subject as above. Filed No. 29.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent the Honorable Major General Smallwood:

Sir:

The Board this day received a Letter from General Davidson, wherein he mentions, in very strong Terms, dissatisfaction at having such a number of Militia Horse; that they consumed all the Forage, and rendered but little service, for want of being trained. You will be able, by being on the ground, to determine whether it will not be advisable to send back part of the Horse. You will do what you think best for the public good. The men were to serve two months after they got to Salisbury.

The Board have written to General Harrington, informing him of your accepting the Command of our Troops, and directed him to apply to you for Instructions how he should conduct himself. You will also take upon you the Command of all our Troops that are called out into service, and give them such Directions as you judge best for the Interest of this and the United States. The Board will be glad to hear from you as often as you can conveniently write, as it is our desire to call out such Aid as may be thought necessary to reinforce the Army.

Opened a Letter from General Davidson to Gov. Nash, relative to the situation, &c. of the Enemy, the Wants of his Brigade, &c. Copy. Filed No. 30.

-------------------- page 418 --------------------

Ordered that the Court House in Hillsborough be repaired and made fit for the Reception of the public Provisions & Forage.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Colonel Robert Rowan.

Sir:

As the public Stores in your possession are much wanted by the Continental Army at this place, particularly by our own Troops, the new Recruits, you will therefore please to send on all the Clothing, Shoes, Canvas and every Article you have necessary for their Equipment. We are told a Number of Saddles and Bridles are ready at Cross Creek; let them be also sent, as the Horse immediately demand them. Four or five Waggons attend you to bring them, some of which may be loaded with ammunition and Salt.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Brigadier General Harrington:

Sir:

General Gates' Orders for your Retreat from the Peedee were unknown to the Board of War until your arrival at Cross Creek a post so essential to be kept up for the support of this State and protection of our Neighboring Friends in So. Carolina that the Legislature had this Object particularly in view.

On the Remonstrance of the Board, Gen. Gates has countermanded your Orders, which you will receive with this. As Mask's Ferry seems rather too high up the River for the purpose intended, you will therefore please to exercise your own Discretion as to your main Post on the Peedee, so that it is not far above or below the Boundary and your particular Detachments. The Army stand in great need of provisions, particularly Cattle. Colonel Brown hath a particular command from the Governor, by Direction of the Assembly, to collect all the Cattle on or near Peedee, so as not to distress private Families or Individuals, and have them drove into the interior parts of this State. You will Sir, have the Superintendence of Colonel Brown and all the Officers serving in your Quarter, to direct their particular Movements and Detachments, either to join

-------------------- page 419 --------------------
you or otherwise. Other officers and men from you may be employed in the like service, which is so importunate and pressing at this juncture. Mr. Amis is directed to attend and receive the Cattle and have them drove to this post. You have a Hint dropped you from General Gates, which perhaps may shortly be carried into Execution. General Smallwood, has accepted the Command of our Militia, with whom you will please to correspond. He with, Colonel Morgan, hath marched for Salisbury.

Mr. John Taylor appointed issuing Commissary of Provisions and Forage in the Town of Hillsborough.


23rd September.

Received a Letter from Brigr. Genl. Jones, informing of his arrival with part of his Brigade at Wake Court House, his intended Rout, &c. Filed No. 31.

———


Thursday, 12th October, 1780.

An Order issued for 5 Bushels Lime for the use of the Tan Yard, Cross Creek.

An Order given Colonel Williams, Maryland, for Two pairs.

Received a Letter from Governor Jefferson, Virg., informing that it is out of his power to comply with the request of the Board as to Arms, &c. Filed No. 32.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent the Delegates of this State in Congress:

Gentlemen:

The great Number of Small Arms our Militia lost in the late defeat near Camden, and our Magazines being greatly exhausted, caused the Board to address Governor Jefferson on this subject that he would supply this State with what stands of Arms could be spared from Virginia; this day we have received his answer, which is endorsed that none can be expected from them. Our next resource must be from Congress. A supply of Three or Four Thousand Stand are immediately wanting; you will be pleased to manage this matter as your Prudence will direct with Congress. Procure what you can and have them sent on. Ferguson's Defeat you

-------------------- page 420 --------------------
have from General Davidson's Letter, enclosed in this.

Received a Letter from Captain Wm. Dent, issuing Commissary at Guilford Court House, relative to Transactions in his Department Filed No. 33.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Captain William Dent:

Sir:

The Board are sorry that there is any Competitorship between the Contractor for the Continental Troops and the County Commissioner who such supplies being procured must be accountable to the Board, the Continental Contractor being not. However, Provisions must be issued to the Troops in whoseever Hands they are, keeping proper Accounts thereof. Mr. White must use his utmost Exertions to procure Supplies for General Gates' Army, which we expect to have marched off immediately, and must have many assistants for that purpose.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Colonel Saunders, Caswell:

Sir:

The Board have had no return from you as to the Requisition of Waggons from your County; by this time it is expected the Captains have furnished you with proper returns of the Waggons in their Districts agreeable to the Orders of the Board dated 24th September, 1780. One Brigade of Waggons is now wanting from Caswell County, which is to consist of Six or more, if possible, being absolutely necessary to attend at this place, to bring from different Posts articles for the Army. Your Prudence will suggest to you the mode of ordering them out of every District, that the Waggon duty may be performed by rotation and be equal to all Possessors of Waggons, in the mean while indulging the poor Planter who may be deprived of sowing his Grain or performing some necessary Business on his plantation. Two Months Service is expected from them, however their private Necessities at home, the Board will be attentive to. These Waggons may be loaded to this place with Corn or Oats from the County Commissioner.

-------------------- page 421 --------------------

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent General Smallwood.

Sir:

Yours of the 16th to Mr. Penn, was Yesterday received by the Board containing the Interesting Intelligence of the Defeat of the Tories at the Shallow Ford. We congratulate you on this occasion, as also Major Cloyd & the brave men under his command who effected this important Stroke. The ready attention you have paid to this part of the State, long distracted by these Miscreants, but at length happily subdued, demand the Acknowledgments of this Country, and we receive it as an Earnest of those future Advantages which, we flatter ourselves, will be derived to it from your command.

As you have with you a number of Militia from different parts of the State, whose Term of Service will expire at different periods, you will please to furnish the Board as soon as possible with Returns of the same. The Number of men at the different Posts, from what District and their Term of Service, that we may be enabled, agreeable to the powers vested in us from the Legislature, to make such further Requisition, of Aids from the State as will be sufficient to support you.

General Gates, having received a supply of some Cloathing from the Northward, this day informed us he would march by next Monday to join you.

Received a Letter from Colo. Johnston, Warren, relative to the Specific Tax. Filed No. 34.

Received a Letter from William Christmass, Commissioner for Warren County, relative to his proceedings. Filed No. 35.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Colonel Wm. Johnston, Warren:

Sir:

Yours of the 8th of October this day came to Hand, relative to the Building Store Houses at the Court House of your County for the Reception of the provision Tax. This the Board conceives will be attended with great Expence, and the Exemption of a number of Workmen for that purpose will deprive the public of perhaps a much more essential Service in the Field. These Mechanicks who have had Exemptions are performing Services of

-------------------- page 422 --------------------
the most important kind for the Army, and what cannot be dispensed with. We flatter ourselves some Merchant Store Houses or private Gentleman's out Houses may be got in the County of Warren, tho' not immediately in the Centre, that may answer the purpose much better than the building of them, which must be attended with delay, the Engineers of the Army now demanding immediate Supplies.

As to provisions furnished since the passing the late Act for that purpose, Certificates given by the County Commissioner shall be received, if tendered, to discharge the pecuniary but not the Provision Tax, and the Board are sorry any disputes should arise on a subject of which full information might have been had from the Representatives of the County. The Board will be obliged to Colonel Johnston to recommend to the Board some proper person to be issuing Commissary to the Troops mentioned in your Letter, who will receive from Mr. Christmass provisions for that purpose and account for the same.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Mr. Wm. Christmass, Warren:

Sir:

Yours, dated 8th October, was this day received. The Board are pleased with the promising account of Crops in your County, and expect you will, therefore, make great Collections of provision Supplies, now much wanted at this place. You will, therefore, forward on all you have on Hand with the utmost Expedition, retaining only sufficient to supply the Horsemen stationed in Warren. The Army are in particular distress for Cattle, you will attend to this Article, that their Wants in some Measure may be relieved as soon as possible.

Colo. Johnston is wrote to to recommend some person to the Board for an issuing Commissary to the Troops mentioned by you, who, being made accountable, will receive from you provisions and Forage, and issue accordingly. It appears to the Board that the County Commissioner and issuing Commissary are incompatible and ought not to be in one person; however, from your Zeal and Integrity in the Service of your Country, we are sensible the public hath not received any Injury.

Ordered that Peter Lewis and Isaac Thrasher, Inhabitants of

-------------------- page 423 --------------------
Guilford County, now confined on a supposition that they are guilty of Treason, be discharged, Captain Oneal, to whose Company they belong, vouching for their friendly Intentions.

Received a Letter from Colonel Thomas Taylor, giving an Account of the Situation of his men, containing a Request that they be sent to the Westward. Filed No. 36.

An Order given Doctor Warfield for Leather for a Bridle.


Tuesday 13th October, 1780.

Received a Letter from General Smallwood, relative to the Board's procuring him a Horse. Filed No. 37.

Received a Letter from Colonel Polk, relative to the Business of his Department. Filed No. 38.

Received likewise a Letter from Colonel Polk, relative to the Defeat of Colo. Ferguson. Filed No. 39.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent His Excellency, Governor Nash:

Sir:

The Enemy advancing to Charlotte in Force induced the Board to change the Rout of General Jones from Peedee to the Yadkin, as Sumner is weak and wanted more support. Gen. Harrington hath been ordered back to Cross Creek by General Gates, which was unknown to us until his arrival at that place. On the Remonstrance of the Board, shewing the Necessity and Importance of the post on Peedee, he hath countermanded his orders, and General Harrington will occupy his Station near the Boundary of Cheraws, and take under his immediate Command the Parties of Brown, Culp, Marion and others in that Quarter, which will enable him to send Detachments into South Carolina, perhaps to Cambden. General Smallwood, with two hundred light Infantry Troops of Maryland, marched last Saturday, attended by Colonel Morgan, to take Command of our Militia in Rowan; Colonel Washington, with one Hundred Horse, on Monday followed.

General Davidson is posted at Rocky River and Sumner at the Yadkin. Gen. Sumpter is gone to the Westward of Charlotte and will act the Partisan in South Carolina, as before. We Congratulate your Excellency on the Defeat of Ferguson, a formidable Enemy in our Western Counties, an account of which from Davidson you have endorsed. This Defeat gives in the Country to Augusta,

-------------------- page 424 --------------------
which, as you had in our last, was attacked by Colonel Clark 3 Days and partly carried, but was obliged to retreat from the Block Houses, bringing with him three Hundred Horse Loads of Indian Goods.

An Aid appears absolutely necessary from the three Lower Districts; about two Hundred men only are with General Gregory; Jarvis's and Exum's Regiments almost all discharged. You will therefore please, with your Council, to order this Matter as will seem best.

The Army are in great distress for Provisions; the County of Orange is greatly harrassed with supplying them. Little Supplies have yet come in from other Counties; we have called on Edenton District to send Wheat and Flour to Halifax. A Proclamation from your Excellency, explaining the Necessities of the Army, with a promulgation of the Act of Assembly for Provision Supplies, would perhaps greatly assist the County Commissioners. However, the Army at the Yadkin are tolerably well supplied by Colonel Polk. General Gates informs us he will march immediately with the main body when he hath equipped the Troops with Shoes, which perhaps will be on Monday or Tuesday next. Six Hundred Suits of Cloathes are arrived for them from Maryland at Taylor's Ferry. Smallwood is promoted to the rank of Major General.

The Duties of the Board are very urgent at present, and demand the immediate attention of a full one; Mr. Penn and myself only attend this service. We have not heard yet whom you have honoured with Appointments to fill up the Vacancies of the Board; this you will please to have done as soon as possible, and we flatter ourselves that men of ability and Attention to Business will be the persons.

Sundry Resolves of Congress have come to Hand addressed to you, which are inclosed.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent General James Davis, Esquire:

Sir:

That there should be a Uniformity in the Certificates to be given by the County Commissioners for provision Supplies, the Board have thought proper to direct you to print a number of

-------------------- page 425 --------------------
Blanks, with some suitable Device, and to be sewed in Books, out of which they may be cut, indented and Numbered. This will prevent Counterfeits, as we make no doubt attempts of this kind will be made. The Blanks you will please to send to the Commissioners of the respective Counties as soon as possible. The Board are in much want of the Acts of last Session, as the public in general are. You will, therefore, transmit the same to the Counties with the utmost Dispatch.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Colonel Thomas Polk:

Sir:

Yours, by Mr. Polk, was this day received by the Board, and are sorry that any Misrepresentation of the provision Department should have affected you, as we are sensible, from your Zeal and Activity, nothing will be wanting on your part to obtain Supplies for the Army. We know the Possession of Charlotte by the Enemy hath subjected you to many great Inconveniences you could not prevent, and the Board are willing to make you every allowance for the same. By the Defeat of Ferguson you may be enabled to draw great supplies from the Western parts of this State. General Smallwood is desired to consult you on this Subject, and a proper Command will be made out, agreeable to your Direction, we make no doubt.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Brig. General Sumner:

Sir:

General Gates hath laid before the Board a Letter addressed from you to him, asking his approbation to decline the Militia Service. As you conceive yourself, with other Continental Officers, maltreated by the General Assembly's requesting General Smallwood to take the Militia Command, the General submits this Matter to the Board, as it immediately concerns this State. We shall not undertake to justify the Policy of the General Assembly in their request to General Smallwood, thereby impliedly tho' not directly superseding Major General Caswell in the Command. You, Sir, was invited by the Assembly, with your Officers, into the Service under Gen'l Caswell, which you were then pleased to accept. General Caswell's Situation at that time prevented

-------------------- page 426 --------------------
him from taking the Field. General Smallwood, whose Military Fame is great, was about returning to Maryland to equip his Troops, to prevent which, however impolite, he was desired to stay and command our Militia, with the Rank he then bore, not suggesting it could affect your Honour or the Officers of the Line, when his Continental Rank was superior to yours, and your having accepted a Command under a Militia Major General. This Country, we are sensible, have a just sense of you and your Officer's Merit, and desire to have you employed in the Defence of it, suitable to your wishes, not wounding your Feelings; and should you leave the service at this Critical Juncture, in the Face of your Enemy, the Board will sincerely regret and wish that the brave and virtuous Soldiers will dispense with immediate Inconveniences, and will not, for the little punctilios of Honor, suffer his Country to be given into the Hands of a merciless Enemy.

The Letter above attended to. Filed No. 40.

———


Saturday, 14th October, 1780.

An Order for Two pairs of Shoes given Captain Dyer for a couple of Soldiers of his Company.

An Orderer on the Commissioners of Trade for twenty-five bushels Salt given Colonel Wooten, Wake:


Sunday, 15th October, 1780.

Received a Letter from Mr. John Ramsey, Chatham, relative to Beef Cattle. Filed No. 41.

———


Monday, 16th October, 1790.

Mr. Davis appeared and took his Seat at the Board.

Ordered that the Following be made out and handed Doctor Brown:

Sir:

A number of sick British Prisoners in Gaol have petitioned the Board for relief, as their case is truly wretched and deplorable; they are therefore recommended to your Humanity and Care.

-------------------- page 427 --------------------

Received a Letter from General Davidson, relative to a Return of his Brigade, &. Filed No. 42.

Received a Letter from the Honl. Wm. Sharpe, Esq. Filed No. 42.

———


Tuesday, 17th October, 1780.

Received a Letter from William Dent. Guilford, on the Subject of Provisions. Filed No. 43.

Captain Agier a pair shoes, Thackston's Boy Ditto.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Colonel Scurlock, Chatham.

Sir:

The Board suppose you have, agreeable to the request by them made, caused the Waggons in your County to be formed into Brigades. They are in immediate want of one Brigade consisting of Six at least, this you will be pleased to send on to this place with the greatest Dispatch loaded with Corn, Forage, &c., from the Commissioner of your County, as, in default, delays dangerous to the State will be occasioned. Confiding in your Zeal, Activity and Exertions at this Crisis, we are, &c.

Received a Letter from Colonel John Lutrell, relative to the Tories in Chatham, &c. Filed No. 44.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Colonel Lutrell, Chatham:

Sir:

The Board have received your Letter by Mr. Cage, and return you their Thanks for your Vigilance and Activity in your Country's service and Defence. You will receive by Mr. Cage, the Ammunition, &c., required. The Circumstance of sending down a Soldier or Two for the purpose you allude to in your Letter, we must apply to General Gates about, as General Smallwood has left this some time. We will however, attend to it immediately; and let us intreat you, Dear Sir, to be as active as possible in suppressing and apprehending those Miscreants, and treat them with the Severity they deserve, which you know without defining. We shall send you in a few days further Orders and Instructions.

-------------------- page 428 --------------------

Our Accounts from the Westward that may be depended on are, that on the 7th Instant, our Force under Colonels Cleveland, Williams, Shelby and others, defeated Colonel Ferguson and his party about 40 Miles above Charlotte, killed 150 on the spot and took 810 Prisoners with 1,500 Stands of Arms and their whole Camp Apparatus: the British Troops left Charlotte on the 12th inst. in the night, in a great Hurry and confusion, leaving 15 or 20 Waggons loaded with various Articles, &c., &c. General Davidson, Colonel Morgan and Major Davis will hang on their Flanks and harrass them without ceasing. They are pushing for Camden with the utmost Dispatch. A few Tories, who had the audacity to embody at the Moravian Town three days ago, were attacked by a party of our Militia, and 15 of the Insurgents killed and the rest totally dispersed; four taken prisoners.

An Order issued for 25 lbs. Powder, 50 lbs. Lead, 100 flints for the use of Colonel Lutrells Company.

An order given Captain Oldham for a pair Half Boots.

An Order given John Taylor, Com., for two Bushels of Salt.

Received a Letter from General Smallwood, relative to the defeat of the Tories at the Shallow Ford. Filed No. 45.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Colonel Thomas Polk:

Sir:

As Captain Beard of Salisbury by Information hath a large quantity of Shoe Leather in Guilford, and perhaps on Hand in Town, the Board request you to procure it, either by contracting for it with green hides or otherwise. Shoes are much wanted for the Troops and covers for Cartouch Boxes.

The Board have at present a Factory of Shoes at this place, and would be glad to form one at Salisbury; Shoemakers will be exempted from a Tour of duty who work in it. Cartouch Boxes wanting covers may be covered at Salisbury by proper persons employed by you. If all the Leather is in Guilford, one-half can be sent to this place, the other to Salisbury, by Waggons ordered by you. The Confidence the Board have in Colonel Polk's Attention to the Welfair of the public service in general hath induced them to repose this particular Trust in him.

-------------------- page 429 --------------------

Wednesday, 18th October, 1780.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent the Delegates of this State in Congress:

Gentlemen:

Inclosed you have the account of Lord Cornwallis's Retreat from Charlotte with precipitation, by reason, as we suppose, of Ferguson's Defeat; as also the killing and dispersing a Number of Tories at the Shallow Ford by Major Cloyd of Virginia. These events are truely interesting to this State, and give a Sprightly Countenance to our affairs, so lately clouded and embarrassed. As the Seat of War of late hath been in this State, and may continue to be in its vicinity some Time, it is absolutely necessary that we be furnished with a proper Supply of Arms and Military Stores, as wrote to you in our last. Waggons are in great Demand to move the Army; the late defeat hath deprived us of a great number of those useful Vehicles. Virginia must be pressed to furnish us some.

———


Thursday, 19th October, 1780.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Major General Smallwood:

Sir:

Representation hath been made to the Board by Colonel Macdowell that a number of Cattle and all kinds of provisions may be collected in the Western parts of this State with Ease, as Ferguson's Party is defeated, and little Interruption may be expected from that quarter. We beg leave to recommend this Subject to you, that a vigilant, active Officer with a suitable Command be appointed for this purpose, which is so essentially necessary for the support of the Army.

These Supplies of Provisions Colonel Polk can be consulted upon, who will point out what Routs may be taken, and how brought to camp, as he is well acquainted with this part of the State.

The Board congratulate Major General Smallwood on his promotion by Congress.

-------------------- page 430 --------------------

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Colonel Ramsey, Chatham.

Sir:

The Army at this place will shortly be in want of Beeves, and not having been supplied with any from your County the Board request that you will order the County Commissioner to have immediately drove to this place as many Beeves as he possibly can.


15th October.

An Order given John Taylor for 3 Bushels Salt, public use.

Received a Letter from General Harrington relative to his Movement from Cross Creek, flying Reports, &c. Filed No. 46.

An Order given Mr. Ford, Com. to the Maryland Line, for 12 Barrels Corn.

Andrew Brooks, a pair of Shoes.

———


Friday, 20th October, 1780.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Colonel Burton:

Sir:

The Board, with the utmost Impatience, are desirous of hearing from you how you have managed the County Commissioners, what provisions you have collected and Waggons procured. We have not had any account from you since your appointment as to these matters.

The great Exigencies of the Army demand immediate supplies, which must be had at every hazard and Event, otherwise the Consequences will be fatal to this Country. Much is therefore depending on your Exertions, having under your care two large Districts abounding with all kinds of Necessaries, which by this time we are of opinion might have been here had the Commissioners done their duty and full attention been paid this Service.

Mr. Vass, the Commissioner of Granville, hath behaved with great Remissness of duty, as almost every one in the Counties below you, except Warren. Nothing they have done as yet; they must be superceded for Negligence, and assistants be appointed by you to immediately purchase, impress or otherwise procure provisions

-------------------- page 431 --------------------
at this critical Juncture, should they continue remiss. The Army march next Monday, and scarce anything here to support them. Beef must be had and drove here with the utmost dispatch, as also eight Waggons to carry the Baggage. The Board flatter themselves, from your zeal for your Country, that nothing will be wanting in you to carry the above into Effect.

An Orders given Colonel Williams, Maryland, for a pair of Pistol Holsters.

An Order given Colonel Ford for a Sword Scabbard.

Lt. Rudder, Leather for Straps; Boots mended.

Colonel Gunby, Leather for Boots.


19th October.

Received a Letter from Mr. Jno. Ramsey relative to Beef Cattle. Filed No. 47.

Thomas Amis, Esquire, Bladen, appointed and commissioned Superintendent Commissary of Wilmington District.

Ordered that the Following be made out for the Commissary of Wilmington District:

1st. You are to enlist a Company, not exceeding Twenty-five men, to be enrolled under a commissioned Officer by you chosen, who shall send their own Horses, whose service for three months shall be a Tour of Duty.

2nd. That you proceed with the said Company to Peedee, and receive from General Harrington and the Officers under his Command all such Cattle and Hogs they may have collected; and other places, where the same may be in the District of Wilmington or South Carolina, and have them drove to such Posts contiguous to the Army, for which you will have notice.

3rd. That you, out of the Drafts or otherwise, engage on a Tour of Duty Coopers to prepare Wood and make Barrels and Casks, proper for salting up Beef and Pork, with the utmost Expedition, at Cross Creek and other places which will be assigned you for this purpose; this service of three months shall be deemed a Tour of Duty as aforesaid.

4th. That you exercise all the powers invested in the County Commissioners as to the Hiring or impressing any Article or thing necessary for this Service, conforming yourself to the Laws of this State.

-------------------- page 432 --------------------

Saturday, 21st October, 1780.

A Return of Shoes necessary to refit the Regular Officers at Hillsboro made by Colonel Williams, Maryland.

———


Sunday, 22nd October, 1780.

Received from General Smallwood a Letter on Military Affairs, enclosing a Return of the No. Carl. Militia under his Command. Filed No. 48.

———


Monday, 23rd October, 1780.

Received a Letter from Gov. Nash, relative to embodying the Militia, &c. Filed No. 49.

Received a Letter from Colo. Jno. Lutrell, desiring salt for his Company. Filed No. 50.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent John Lutrell, Esq:

Sir:

As the necessity ceases of continuing the Company raised under your Command longer in Chatham, it is the Opinion of the Board that they may be employed to much greater advantage under General Harrington on Peedee, and answer many valuable purposes, either in collecting provisions for the Army or Harrassing the Enemy, if any there.

You will therefore proceed to Peedee with your Company as soon as possible, taking such disaffected Neighborhoods in your Way where the Tories may be embodied, whom you may quietly subdue, and put yourself under the Command of Genl. Harrington for the purposes aforesaid.

Received a Letter from Governor Nash relative to the Arrival of Admiral Rodney at Sandy Hook, &c. Filed No. 51.

An Order given Major Davidson for Mending his Boots.

An Order given Captain Benson for Several Scabbards and Boots.

An Order given Colonel Payne for one Thousand Cartridges for the use of the Militia under his Command.

-------------------- page 433 --------------------

Tuesday, 24th October, 1780.

Received a Letter from Colonel Thomas Wade on the subject of his furnishing a certain number of Shoes for the Troops. Filed No. 52.

Received a Letter from Philip Vass, Commissioner Granville, relative to his department. Filed No. 53.

Received a Letter from the Honbl. Samuel Spencer, Esq., on Military affairs. Filed No. 54.

Paid into the Hands of Alexander Mebane, Commissioner of Orange, £600 for Contingencies in his department.

An Order for two pairs of Shoes; delivered Mr. Mebane, the shoes for persons in public Employ.

An Order given Mr. Taylor for Grinding and Bolting Twenty Bushels Wheat for the use of the Hospital in Hillsborough.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Colonel Thomas Wade:

Sir:

The Board have taken your Letter under Consideration, relative to the Shoes. As they have no continental Money in Hand, and Gen. Gates, having in like Cases refused to draw on the Treasury, we cannot recede from the Terms agreed on by you with Colonel Martin, which we wish might be complied with, as it would hasten the March of the Troops; otherwise they must wait till we supply them from our Factory.

Paid into the Hands of Abishai Thomas, Five Hundred Dollars, to be applied towards the Hire and Expence of an Express to Governor Rutledge.

———


Wednesday, 25th October, 1780.

Received a Letter from Colonel Robert Burton relative to the Business of his Department. Filed No. 55.

Received a Letter from Governor Nash on State and other Matters. Filed No. 56.

Richard Downs, a Prisoner from Anson County, confined on Suspicion of Toryism, released on his promising to serve three Months in the Militia Service, Captain Bogan being his security.

-------------------- page 434 --------------------

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Brigadier General Harrington:

Sir:

In our last we mentioned to you the Article of Cattle, which is greatly wanted by the Army. We again press that very important Subject upon you. Peedee must have great Resources of this kind, and we expect that Colo. Brown and the other Officers ordered by you to collect Cattle have, by this Time, procured many. General Gates marches this Week to the Southward, by way of Salisbury and Charlotte. To either of those posts some must be sent as soon as possible. The Cold Season coming on will require a quantity of Beef to be Barrelled. You will inform the Board of the Prospect of Cattle on Peedee, by which we may judge of the propriety of barrelling up Beef at some Stage there, convenient for the Army, which we flatter ourselves, from Ld. Cornwallis's precipitate Retreat from Charlotte, will soon be near Camden. If Mr. Amis, pursuant to his Orders, should not attend you immediately for Cattle, you will please to order off a Guard, with what you have on Hand, to either of the above places.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent His Excellency, Governor Nash:

Sir:

The Account of Lord Cornwallis's Retreat from Charlotte no doubt hath reached you before this, who by the last Advices was making the best of his way to Camden, with great precipitation, leaving many of their Waggons, with valuable Baggage, behind them. Whether this sudden movement of the Enemy was occasioned by Ferguson's Defeat, or what other cause, is uncertain. However, their Situation at Charlotte hath been rendered very troublesome by the close attention paid them by Davidson and Davie, who, with Colo. Morgan, are now hanging on and greatly distress them; General Sumpter, with Colonels Campbell, Shelby and others, with upwards of Two Thousand Militia, keeping pace with them on the other side of the Catawba. These Appearances, Sir, greatly brighten the Countenance of our Affairs. General Gates intends marching To-morrow with the Troops refitted, the rest to follow as soon as equipped. Virginia hath poured in a number of ragged Troops, wanting every necessary, who will

-------------------- page 435 --------------------
greatly distress us to relieve them; No Cloathing, No Arms and no provisions with them.

Your Excellency was pleased to drop a small account relative to Major General Caswell. The Board have a High sense of that General's Merit and former Services, and would wish to have him employed, in the present Exigencies of our affairs, suitable to his Wishes, but to have a sole Command must certainly be incompatible with that of the Commander-in-Chief, when a separate Command would, perhaps, be acceptable to the General, and not subject him to the Command of any officer but the Commanderin-Chief of the Southern Department. The Board beg leave, therefore, to recommend that your Excellency propose a Separate Command to the Acceptance of Major General Caswell.

Dr. Burke hath applied to the Board of Trade for Money to support him at Congress; that Board have not answered his Expectations. As our affairs require the immediate attendance of that Gentleman in Congress, we desire that your Excellency would interfere on this subject with them. General Sumner, with the Continental Officers, having taken Umbrage at General Smallwood's taking the Militia Command, have left the Service and are returning home. This Conduct must be taken notice of, especially on so critical a Juncture.

Received a Letter, together with fifty-seven Pair Shoes, from Colo. Wade, for which a Certificate was sent him. Letter filed No. 57.

———


Thursday, 26th October, 1780.

Return of Shoes issued from the Factory, Hillsborough, by John Taylor, Superintendent.

Received a Letter from General Smallwood, relative to the appointment of a Surgeon General to the Militia of this State, &c. Filed No. 58.

-------------------- page 436 --------------------

Friday, 27th October, 1780.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Governor Nash:

Sir:

By the accounts received from Virginia, with which you must be acquainted before this, it seems the Enemy mean to manœuvre in that Quarter again. From the Number of only Sixty Transports, as mentioned by Colonel Benbury, their Intentions must be to procure Provisions, of which they stand in great need. The Governor of Virginia mentions to General Gates Five Thousand troops, but this he is not certain of; however, should they be serious to invade Virginia in Force, this State must endeavour to render such assistance to her as can be obtained at present to prevent an invasion from them. And for this purpose the Board beg leave to recommend to your Excellency that the Drafts from New Bern and Edenton be employed against the Enemy in Virginia, should they continue any time. And if additional aids be requisite, Halifax, New Bern and Edenton Districts must furnish them, as the upper Districts, with Wilmington, have their Hands full at present with the Western Enemy.

Our Affairs still wear a good Appearance with Lord Cornwallis.

Nothing Material from General Smallwood since our last.

Rec'd a Letter from honbl. W. Sharpe, Esqr. Filed No. 58.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Mr. John W. Stanly, New Bern:

Sir:

You will please to deliver to Major Vandross, on his Order, so much Canvas as will make him a convenient Horseman's Tent, in lieu of one he hath left for the use of the Field Officers now in the service of this State, and charge the same to the publick.

An Order or Warrant for the Impressment of Medicine and Chirurgical Instruments absolutely necessary for the Recovery of the sick at the Hospital at this post, given Dr. Brown, to be executed in case of the owners or persons possessing such Medicines or Instruments refusing to sell the same at reasonable prices.

An Order for the Release of John Abbott, confined on Suspicion of Treason, on his enlisting in the Continental Service for three years. Rd. Abbott his Security.

-------------------- page 437 --------------------

Saturday, 28th October, 1780.

Received a Letter from Major Armstrong, requesting to be furnished with Sundry Camp Necessaries. Filed No. 59.

Received a Letter from Robert Rowan, Esqr., relative to Matters within his Department. Filed No. 60.

Return of the North Carolina Militia Prisoners wounded on the 16th and 17th August last, made by Doctor Hugh Williamson, Surgeon Gen. No. Carl. Militia.

Joshua Harvey and Isaac Gilden, No. Carolina Regulars, a pair of Shoes each. A pass granted them, and John Carter, a Regular likewise to repair to their respective Homes during their Furlough.

Received a Letter from General Jones relative to his Brigade. Filed No. 61.

Peter Johnson, John McKee, David McKee, Andrew McKee, and—McKee, Prisoners on Suspicion of Toryism, paroled to remain within 8 miles of the Town of Hillsborough, and to return when called upon.

Received a Letter from the Honbl. Wm. Sharpe, Esqr., informing that a number of Tents were about to be sent from the North Ward for the use of the Southern Army. Filed No. 62.

Received a Letter from General Harrington informing of the Operations of his Brigade, &c. Filed No. 63.

Usery, son of John, ordered to be discharged from Confinement on his enlisting himself a Continental Soldier for 12 Months; confined for refusing to march.

Sunday, 29th October, 1780.

An Order given Captain Finley for 41 pair Shoes for the use of his Company of Artillery.

Return of Military and other Stores by Nicholas Long, Esquire, Quarter Master.

-------------------- page 438 --------------------

Monday, 30th October, 1780.

Return of Sword Blades by Abishai Thomas, assistant Quartermaster.

An Order given Major Armstrong for one Camp Kettle and one pair of Shoes.

A Warrant entitling the person furnishing Major Armstrong with 10½ yards Linen to Three Thousand one Hundred and Fifty Dollars from the Public, given Major Armstrong.

An Order given Captain Boggan for 5℔ Powder, 500 Musket Balls, 20 Gun Flints and one Gun and Bayonet, for the use of his Company.

An Order issued for two pairs Shoes, one for the Servant of Major Richmond, the other for Colonel Cusiasko's (Kosciusko's) Servant.

An Order given Mr. Edmiston for one Hundred and Seventy-Six Yards Long Ells for Jackcoats and overalls for the Continental Waggoners.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Colonel Williams of the Maryland Line:

Sir:

Having a few Sword Blades in our Military Stores intended for the Horse for which frequent application have been made by many of the Officers whose immediate Necessities we are ignorant of, the Board being anxious, as far as in them lies, to have every officer now under marching Orders, who hath not a Spontoon, furnished with this necessary Weapon, will deliver Sword Blades to such Officers who come under the above description, a Return of whom is requested from you.

Return of Officers without Spontoons and wanting Sword Blades, made by Colonel Williams.

An Order issued for furnishing said Officers with Sword Blades.

———


Tuesday, 31st October, 1780.

Received a Letter from Philip Vass, County Commissioner Granville. Filed No. 64.

An Order given Captain Moore for Leather for a pair of Shoes.

An Order given Major Davidson for a Sword Blade.

-------------------- page 439 --------------------

An Order given Captain Gathier for a Sword Blade.

An Order given Captain Debonefor (De Bonfort ?) a pair of Shoes for his Servant.

An Order given Captain McAlister for a Sword Blade.

An Order given Ensign Boyd for a Sword Blade.

An Order given Ensign Fickle for a pair of Shoes.

Received a Letter from Green Hill, Esqr., Treasurer, on the Subject of furnishing County Commissioners with Money, &c. Filed No 65.

An Order given Captain Foard for a pair of Shoes for his Servant.

Received a Letter from General Smallwood, informing of the Enemy's having crossed the Catawba, &c. Filed No. 66.

———


Wednesday, 1st November, 1780.

An Order given Major Armstrong for Leather for a Sword Scabbard.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent the Director of Chiswell's Lead Mines:

Sir:

Governor Jefferson of Virginia hath given Gov. Nash of this State an Order for Two Thousand Weight of Lead, which you have herewith. As that quantity is far inadequate to the present necessities of our Militia now in the Field against the Common Enemy, of which Gov. Jefferson was ignorant at the time of granting it, the Board of War of this State do request that you send by the Bearer an additional Supply of Two Thousand weight more, amounting in the whole to four Thousand Weight, and we pledge the Faith and Honor of the State for the payment of the same:

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Colonel Martin Armstrong, Surry:

Sir:

As the wants of the Army of this State demand a supply of Lead from Chiswell's Mines, the Board of War have placed this Trust in you, as you are more convenient and may have it brought

-------------------- page 440 --------------------
over with greater Ease than any other Commanding Officer in the District of Salisbury. You will therefore order out such a number of pack Horsemen under a proper Officer, or Waggons, which to you will seem best for this purpose; 4000 lbs is to be brought for the use of this State and a like Quantity for General Gates' Army, Orders for which you will receive with this by Colonel Campbell. The utmost Dispatch is required in having it brought to Salisbury.

Ordered that Copies of the Following be made out and one forwarded to the Commissioners of Rowan and Mecklenburg, respectively. “Whereas, from the Demands and Necessities of the Army many well-affected Inhabitants of the Counties of Rowan and, Mecklenburg are greatly distressed for the Want of Salt, to relieve whom the Board of War, by Virtue of the powers and Authorities in them vested, do direct and order, that the Commissioner of provision Supplies in those Counties shall hire Waggons and Teams, not to exceed six in each, for the purpose of carrying from Newbern and Cross Creek public Salt to the Counties aforesaid, a Certificate of which being given by the said Commissioners, to the Owner of said Waggon or persons driving the same. The Board of War will grant an Order on the Commissioners of Trade for a Load of Salt, which shall be delivered to the said County Commissioner, and by him dealt out to such persons, whoover and above paying their specific Tax, shall bring in provision and Forage for the use of the Army, retaining still so much Salt in his possession as necessary for salting up the public Beef and pork of the County, provided that he deliver not more than a Bushel of salt to any person as aforesaid, the Value of which being ascertained at the Market, and Expences of the Carriage to the places aforesaid being added thereto, will be the full amount of the same. The County Commissioners, on delivering thereof, will receive so much provision and Forage as will be equal to the said amount, the value of which Provision and Forage to be ascertained by the County Commissioners and two respectable Freeholders.”

An Order given for a pair of Shoes for a Soldier of Maryland Line.

An Order given Captain McAlister for a Sword Scabbard.

An Order sent to Wilcox Works for 500 lbs. Iron.

-------------------- page 441 --------------------

An order given Jno. Wilcox for Ten Bushels Salt.

An Order for a pair Shoes each for two Soldiers, Maryland Line.

An Order given Major Armstrong for a pair Boots each for himself and Colonel Thackston.

An Order given Major Mazaret for Forty pair Shoes for the use of the Continental Troops.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Major General Smallwood:

Sir:

Yours of the 27th October, from New Providence, was yesterday handed us by Mr. Webb, in which we receive with pleasure the account of Lord Cornwallis's Retreat over the Catawba, occasioned first by the defeat of Ferguson, his great Western Bugbear, and last by your new approach, which we make no doubt hath greatly contributed to his Fears; and we are sensible, Sir, you will take every Measure in your power to add to his distress, either by harrassing him on his retreat or cutting off his Supplies. The account of the Militia at Salisbury affects us much, but we know not how to relieve them; they must have been sensible of their own wants when they left Home on a Tour of Duty, and ought to have guarded against them. We recommend they drag out their time of Service, and that you employ them to the best advantage during the same. Respecting the Inhabitants of Rowan and Mecklenburg, as to their want of Salt, the Board have drawn up an order for the Commissioners of those Counties, somewhat agreeable to your plan which you have enclosed, and which we have transmitted to them, that may relieve in some measure the Necessities of those people and retain their provisions for the Army, but we are apprehensive our resources of public Salt will not be sufficient long for this purpose, and at the same time answer the great demands of the Army. We shall, however, do everything in our power to have all the Salt in the State so secured as to answer the most beneficial purposes to the Army and the Inhabitants. The Petitions of Captains Harrison, Oldham and Harris in behalf of themselves and Companies we have attended to. As others under like circumstances have been discharged, tho' contrary to the sense of the Gen. Assembly in their Resolve respecting their Tour of duty, we apprehend the State cannot be much

-------------------- page 442 --------------------
profited from their Services under their present discontents, therefore recommend they be discharged. General Gates this day marches off to join you with what Force is equipped, the Remainder to follow with Expedition. It seems to be confirmed that a body of British have landed at Portsmouth in Virginia; their numbers and Intentions uncertain. All Virginia, we are told, is in Arms, and must be equal to its own defence. If Lord Cornwallis's Army was once in our power the British Power would be wholly broke to the Southward.


Thursday, 2d November, 1780.

Received a Letter from Captain Lutrell, enclosing a List of Prisoners taken by his Com. Filed No. 69.

Received a Letter from John Ramsey, Commissioner, Chatham, relative to Beeves. Filed No. 68.

Ordered that the Shoemakers of the Factory be employed To-morrow in mending the Boots of the Officers and Soldiers of Colonel Armstrong and Corps.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent John Ramsey, Commissioner of Chatham County:

Sir:

The Board are sorry to hear that scarcely any Beefs are to be expected from Chatham, an article so much wanted by the Army. Some public Salt was ordered to you for salting Beef which will be useless to the public in your County; and we cannot barter it for Beef so near the Market. You will, therefore, please to order it to Hillsborough as soon as possible.

All kinds of Provisions are wanted here—Wheat, Corn, anything. The act of Assembly will direct you.

An Order given Captain Dalzell for a pair of Shoes for a Soldier, his servant.

Ordered, (On Application of John Montgomery, of Chatham,) That the Following be made out and sent the Commissioner of said County:

Sir:

Mr. John Montgomery this day produced to the Board Vouchers of his furnishing the Army, when at his House, with a large

-------------------- page 443 --------------------
Quantity of Provision and Forage, the Want of which at present distresses his Family. You will, therefore, examine into the Claims, and, agreeable to the Act of Assembly, summon one Justice and two Freeholders to ascertain what quantity of Provision and Forage he hath on Hand, and what is absolutely necessary for his House Consumption, over and above the same, which, when ascertained, you will deliver him, out of the Specific Tax, a Quantity equal to his Necessity, ascertained as aforesaid, deducting from the Surplus his own Specific Tax. The Remainder of the Surplus, if taken, together with his account for Pasturage, the Public stands chargeable with.

———


Friday, 3d November, 1780.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Captain John L. Beard, Salisbury:

Sir:

The Board some time ago wrote to Colonel Polk relative to your Leather you have on Hand, but have had no answer. The Army are in great Want of it. A Factory of Shoes we have formed at Hillsborough; another we would form at Salisbury, could we have a proper Supply of Leather. We would deal for your Leather in Green Hides at the Usual Rate, or grant you Certificates. You had a Quantity in Guilford, Half of which, if agreeable to you, we wish to be brought to Hillsborough, the other to Salisbury. Mr. Gambel will treat with you on this Subject, which please to inform us of as soon as possible, that Waggons may be imployed to carry it to the above places.

Return made by John Taylor, Issuing Commissary in the Town of Hillsborough.

Copy of a Return by Joseph Thomas, Commissary of Issues, filed.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Captain Yarborough:

Sir:

The Board of War are of opinion that the North Carolina Continental Troops under your Command may be more readily

-------------------- page 444 --------------------
equipped at this place, and for this purpose do direct that you march them to Hillsborough with the utmost dispatch.

Received a Letter from Messrs. Newman, Troy, Chambers and Long, of Rowan, representing the Distresses of the Inhabitants of that County for the Article of Salt, proposing an Expedient, &c. Filed No. 69.

An Order issued for a pair of Shoes for a Continental Soldier.

Ordered that the Following Instructions be made out and given Captain Gamble:

You are to enquire whether Colonel Polk hath formed a Shoe Factory at Salisbury; if not, you will form one. Shoemakers of the Militia to be exempted from a Tour of Duty who will work on the same. You'll treat with Captain Beard for his Leather by Barter for green Hides, at the usual Rate, or granting him Certificates on the State. You'll employ Waggons to bring on Half of the Leather obtained to Hillsborough.

———


Saturday, 4th November, 1780.

Return of the North Carolina Continental Troops in Hillsborough, by Colonel Thackston.

Orde ed that William Bridgers, a Draft from Franklin, be admitted into the Shoe Factory at Hillsborough.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Messrs. Newman, Troy, Chambers and Long, Rowan:

Gentlemen:

Yours by Mr. King was yesterday presented the Board, in which you have stated the great Inconveniences the good people of your County labour under for the Want of Salt. We are anxious to relieve the distresses of our fellow Citizens indiscriminately throughout the State, especially those who have borne in a great degree the Burthen of the Day and felt the Ravages of the War; but we are doubtful the plan proposed by you for the relief of Rowan, under no restriction, would give umbrage to other parts of the State under like necessitous Circumstances. However, from the Representation of the distresses of the people of Mecklenburg by General Smallwood, the Board in some Measure have anticipated the Relief requested by you, a Copy of which Mr. King

-------------------- page 445 --------------------
hath directed to the County Commissioner of Rowan. The great demands of public Salt for the Army prevent us from making a Barter of it for provisions, generally; otherwise the Stock would soon be drawn; yet we would wish a greater distribution of it among the Western Counties.

This day expresses will set off for New Berne and Cross Creek, to bring Returns of all the public Salt at those places, which, when obtained, we shall have a more particular View of our Resources of this Article, which may enable us to grant a further supply.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Colonel Thomas Polk, Superintendent Commissary, Salisbury:

Sir:

The Ravages of the Army no doubt have greatly distressed the Inhabitants of Rowan and Mecklenburg, especially those near the general Routes, as to Provision and Forage, and render the procuring of Supplies very difficult. We are informed there are great quantities of Corn belonging to the Tories now or late in Arms against us, especially those on the Yadkin, Peedee and Rocky Rivers, which, by forfeiture, belong to this State. The Board recommend to you to apply to General Smallwood, or other Commanding Officers of the Army, for proper Fatigues to collect all the Corn and other provisions that come under the above description, and to employ Waggons in carrying the same to Camp, leaving sufficient for the Support of thc poor women and Children who belong to those persons. This would relieve in a great measure the Army, and give Ease to the Inhabitants.

You will please to have particular accounts kept of provisions procured as aforesaid, that they may be laid before the Board and General Assembly.

Received a Letter from Mr. George Fletcher relative to Flour, &c. Filed No. 70.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Mr. George Fletcher:

Sir:

Yours of the 1st November was delivered us by Express this day, and observe that the principal Matters mentioned by you ought to have come from the County Commissioner, without you

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are his Assistant; and we wish not to blend the issuing department with the purchasing, as it must complicate accounts almost impossible to unfold. Mr. Travers, we are told, is the County Commissioner, but we have never heard from him, and would wish to know what has been done. Your Continental Transactions the State has nothing to do with. You are accountable to those you derive your appointment from. All Surplus Flour ought to be impressed by the County Commissioners if it cannot be purchased. Certificates given for money is out of the question. You mention the Bartering of Salt. This the Board cannot admit of, for Spirits or any other Article, at present. Spirits may be purchased on Certificates, or impressed and valued; not otherwise. Mr. Travers hath a right to draw for Five Thousand pounds, agreeable to law, from the Treasurer or Sheriff, having an Order from the Board of War. Mr. Amis, the Superintendent Commissary of Wilmington District, is to consult you with regard to Salting up Provisions, and the County Commissioner. The principal place of salting Provisions must be at this place, or perhaps Salisbury or Peedee. However, we wish to have some salted at Cross Creek. Would wish to know what preparations for that purpose, What Number of Barrels might be had by the first of December, and what quantity of Salt now on Hand, both Continental and State, and what quantity expected from Wilmington, a Return of which is immediately wanted, that Waggons may be employed in carrying some of it to the Western Counties. A quantity of Cattle you delivered Mr. Pendergrast as a Continental Contractor. We are informed a large number of those Cattle were collected by Colonel Brown and others for the State which the State hath no credit for by Mr. Pendergrast's Receipt. Such Omissions are alarming and must be attended to. You will therefore make us an immediate Return of all your State Transactions since your Appointment.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Robert Rowan, Esq.:

Sir:

The Board would be glad to be immediately informed of the Stores you have sent to this place, that are State Property, and what continental, that is to say, what stores have been purchased

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with State Money or on its Credit, and what on General Gates, or Continental Bills by him or any other person given, and inform us particularly as to the Marquis of Brittany's Cargo, how procured and for whom.

The Board are involved in some difficulties with General Gates as to these matters, he claiming all the Stores you have sent here for the Northern Army, and we cannot proceed to the Cloathing of our Soldiers until decided by your Returns.

The Cloathing you mention at Cross Creek is much wanted here for sixty poor distressed North Carolina Recruits; pray send it on with the utmost Expedition; inform us how procured.

We know not who have charge of the public Salt. We want a full return thereof from Cross Creek or Wilmington, what State, what continental. Please to inform the Gentlemen who have it in charge of this Request of the Board as it is necessary to employ Waggons to transmit some to the Western Counties, to Salt up the Specific Tax in that Quarter.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Mr. Patrick Travers:

Sir:

The Board are informed you are County Commissioner for Cumberland, but have not heard from you since your Appointment, as to provision supplies. You will please to inform the Board what Cattle and Provisions you have on hand, what you intend to salt and what preparation you are making for that purpose; Whether Mr. Amis, the Superintendant Commissary, hath consulted you on this subject; in short, the Board would be glad to know of all your Transactions as to this Business since your appointment, as soon as possible.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Mr. Phillip Vass, County Commissioner, Granville:

Sir:

The last Supplies of Cattle and Wheat from Granville have given the Board great satisfaction as to the activity of its County Commissioner. We wish the Commissioners of some of the other Counties were equally industrious; however, we know the Resources of Granville are great as to provision supplies, and we flatter ourselves what you have done is only an Earnest of your future Exertions. You'll inform us what further prospect you

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have of Cattle and Wheat. The Time of salting Beef and Pork will soon arrive, to which we must pay the closest attention.

Received a Letter from Nicholas Long, Esquire, enclosing a Letter from Major Hardy Murfree, containing Information of the Operations of the British in Virginia. Filed No. 71.

Received a Letter from General Davidson, together with a Letter from Colonel Robert Irwin, recommending that certain prisoners from Mecklenburg, confined on a suspicion of Toryism, be set at liberty. Filed No. 72.

Received a Letter from General Davidson, informing of the Enemy's having crossed the Catawba, &c. Filed No. 73.

An Order given Captain Barrett for one Hundred Sword Straps for the use of the Dragoons.


Sunday, 5th November, 1780.

Ordered that the Boots of the Dragoons of the third Regiment be repaired by the Shoemakers of the Factory at Hillsborough.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Colonel Long, Halifax:

Sir:

Yours pr. Express the Board have received, and are obliged to you for the early Intelligence; the Operations of the Enemy seem rather daring and wear a countenance of Seriousness. We are informed the Virginians in very considerable Numbers are in motion to oppose them, and together with the Force from this State, will, we hope, handle them pretty roughly. The Board have great Confidence in you, and are persuaded that you will set every possible Spring in motion below. We have sent off the Lead from this place agreeable to your Request.

The Foot marched from this place on Thursday morning, about 900. The Horse set off to-day. Lord Cornwallis still on the retreat; the last Accounts say that he was upwards of Thirty Miles on the other side of the Catawba, on the Chas. Town Road, and that every thing in Camden wore the appearance of speedy Evacuation. We shall from time to time inform you of the movements and operations of the Enemy in South Carolina, and expect from you the earliest Intelligence as to their Maneouvres in your

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Quarter. Every Article of Cloathing which may arrive from the Northward we wish to be retained for our Officers in Captivity, and nothing to be delivered out without express Orders from the Board.

Received a Letter from John Wilcox on the subject of Iron. Filed No. 74.

Received a Letter from Colonel Edward Carrington relative to Military Stores at Taylor's Ferry, &c. Filed No. 75.

Received a Letter from Major General Gates, recommending that Provisions for the Southern Army be immediately salted up and barrelled. Filed No. 76.

Ordered that the Following be made out and handed Brigadier Gen. Stevens:

Sir:

It being represented to the Board that there are some Mistakes in the Returns, and Abuses in the issuing Commissary's department, which occasion a greater demand of Provisions than really necessary for the Army at this Post, the Board, to prevent an unnecessary Waste or Embezzlement of Provisions, therefore recommend to the Commanding Officer at this Post that he order a proper return of all the Troops, Continental as well as Militia, together with the Artificers and those in the Hospital, to be made to him, the same to be inspected by a Muster Master by him to be appointed for this purpose, who will rectify the Mistakes, if any, and perhaps bring to light Frauds that ought immediately to be checked.


Monday, 6th November, 1780.

Received a Letter from William Christmass, County Commissioner, Warren, informing of the Scarcity of Cattle in his County, &c. Filed No. 77.

An Order issued in favour of John White, Commissioner of Guilford, for fifty Bushels public Salt.

Permission given James Richardson to purchase twenty Barrels of flour for the Use of the Privateer Schooner, Flying Fish.

An Order given Captain McAlister for Canvas for a Portmanteau.

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Received a Letter from General Smallwood, representing the Distresses of the Militia for Provisions, &c. Filed No. 78.

Received a Letter from General Davidson, requesting a supply of Cloathing for certain Continental Officers—inclosing a Letter from General Sumpter relative to the Situation, &c., of the Enemy. Filed No. 79.

Received a Letter from Dr. Alexander, Brigade Surgeon to General Davidson's Command, requesting a Supply of Medicine. Filed No. 80.


Tuesday, 17th November, 1780.

———

By Order of the Board, paid B. Birdsong an Express to Governor Rutledge, Eight Hundred Dollars.

An Order sent the Commissioners of Trade for Sundry Necessaries for the Board of War.

An Order issued on the Commissioners of Trade in Favour of Arthur Arrington, Commissioner of provision Supplies for the County of Nash, for Twenty-five Bushels of Salt.

An Order given B. Birdsong, assistant to the Deputy Quarter Master, for one pair Shoes.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Major General Smallwood:

Sir:

Yours of the 31st Ulto., by Captain Carter, was last night received by the Board. The Scarcity of provisions in your Camp gives us real uneasiness, and we are sorry that Colonel Polk, at this critical juncture, declines the appointment he accepted from the State of superintendent Commissary. He well knows that his appointing the County Commissioners is incompatible with the act of Assembly, and therefore inadmissible; but his recommending to them proper assistants and spurring them on in their general duty, together with the collecting the Supplies in the manner by you mentioned, might answer the valuable purposes intended. But if there is any person in whom Confidence can be placed, the Board will by no means urge Colonel Polk into a Service disagreeable to him. We wish that a proper person be recommended from that part of the State to undertake this necessary Business.

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The Superitendent Commissaries' particular duty as intrusted from the Board, is to receive from the County Commissioners their Supplies and have the same forwarded to the Army. All Volunteer Companies are under the immediate direction of the Commander-in-Chief of the Militia, by whom they may be ordered immediately into Camp, and not to depart thence without Orders. Otherwise, should they still plunder or be refractory to Command, they are liable to be punished as Felons under the Act against Marauding and plundering. A Proclamation from the Commander-in-Chief, or from you as a Commander of the Militia, against their illicit practices might call such Companies into your Army, which, in a great Measure, might prevent the Evil complained of; otherwise their Leaders on disobedience might be apprehended and punished. We sincerely feel for the situation of our Continental Officers, who are much indebted to your friendly Notice. But at present it is not in our power to relieve them, as General Gates hath drawn out of our public Stores almost every thing for the Northern Army. Five Waggons will soon arrive with Goods purchased by General Gates' orders from New Bern, to whom we shall make application, and pray your Mediation in their Behalf, especially for some immediate Necessaries, until the State can make further provision for them. The Board wrote some time ago to Colonel Polk, relative to a Shoe Factory in Salisbury, but we have had no Return from him; however, Captain Gamble is impowered to contract for Leather, and establish one immediately at that place. The Stores at Cross Creek we are daily attending to. As soon as possible the Board will remove to Salisbury or your Vicinity. On overlooking our public Store we find a few pieces of blue Long Ells, Seventy yards of which, together with some Raven Duck, we shall send by the first Opportunity, which may serve for a temporary Expedient for Jackets, Overalls or Breeches to the Officers most in distress.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Brigr. General Davidson:

Sir:

Yours 31st Ulto. was delivered the Board by Captain Carter, together with General Sumter's Letter enclosed. We are sorry that your complaints are so justly founded, and that we have it

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not in our power at present to relieve them, as General Gates hath drawn from out of our public Store almost every Article for the Relief of the Northern Army. He hath sent five Waggons to New Berne to be loaded with a further supply of Goods for the Officers, to whom we shall make application for a distribution of some part among our Officers; and we flatter ourselves General Smallwood on this occasion will mediate in your Behalf.

A Horseman's Tent was intended you by the Board, but Captain Marbury, Quarter Master of the Maryland Troops, packed it up with the Tents of that Line and sent it on with the Army; it will be difficult perhaps to procure it without applying to General Gates. The canvas of which it is made is State Property. However, Captain Marbury informs me he can procure you a Marquee in lieu thereof; you will therefore consult him on this matter, who hath set off to join you.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Dr. Alexander:

Sir:

Yours of the 30th Ulto. was last night presented the Board. Dr. Brown, who is Director General of the Hospital in the Southern Department, hath promised to assist the Hospital to the Westward with Medicines as far as in his power, but Medicine is a scarce article with him, and we are sorry to inform you there is not much in this State. Dr. Williamson is Surgeon General of our Militia, with whom you may further correspond on this important subject. He has promised to procure a Sufficiency if possible.

Ordered, that the Following be made out and sent Brigr. General Sumpter:

Sir:

Mr. McCullock presented the Board with a Letter addressed to Governor Rutledge, and informed us he had brought a Waggon to him to him to be loaded. Gov. Rutledge not being present and the Board unacquainted where he is, took the liberty to open your Letter, thinking it might be in our power to give him some Answer; but finding the Letter containing Reference to some immediate Matters only known to ourselves, we have recommended to Mr. McCullock to return, and bear you in the mean time a

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Load of Twenty-Four Bushels of Salt, an Article perhaps, much wanted by you. Governor Rutledge shall receive your Letter as soon as possible.

General Gates hath drawn out of the public Stores every necessity he could find for the Army. Five Waggons loaded with Goods from New Berne by his Order we expect soon; when they arrive we shall forward on to Camp, to whom you may apply for a distribution of part.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent the Honbl. the North Carolina Delegates in Congress:

Gentlemen:

The Board acknowledge the Favour of Mr. Sharpe by Colonel Malmedy. We have heard nothing of the Arms and Tents as mentioned therein as yet, but conclude they are stopped in Virginia since the Arrival of the British at Portsmouth. It seems by the Manoeuvers of our Enemies, North Carolina is to be between two Fires, and our good and great Allies to be tamed Spectators of each Blaze, without tendering us any assistance in extinguishing either. Nothing certain has been heard from Virginia since the Enemy's landing and the advancing of Two Hundred and fifty of them to Suffolk. Whether they mean seriously to carry the War thro' Virginia into this State or reinforce Lord Cornwallis is uncertain. Time will soon discover.

Lord Cornwallis, since General Sumpter's account to General Davidson, which you have enclosed, by Report only hath divided his Force into two Columns, one was retreating to Ninety-Six, the other was halted between Congaree and Wateree Rivers opposite to Rocky Mount. Last Thursday General Gates marched off what Troops were accoutred at this place to the Amount of one Thousand, and on Monday last set off himself with one Hundred and thirty Continental Horse, including a few of Armand's Corps, to join General Smallwood at Six Mile Creek, about Fifteen Miles below Charlotte.

Received a letter from Mr. Francis Brice, Wilmington, desiring Permission to purchase provisions for the Crews of Certain Vessels. Filed No. 81.

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Wednesday, 8th November, 1780.

An Order given Captain Doney for one pair Shoes.

An Order given Doctors Elbert and Gilbert for a pair of Shoes each, also a pair for each of their Servants.

Graves, a Militia Man of Orange County, excused from a Tour of Duty in the Field, on his applying himself for the Space of three Months in the Public Service as Cooper.

Received a Letter from Colonel Thomas Brown, Bladen, informing of the Proceedings of himself and the Company under his Command. Filed Fo. 82.

Whereas it is represented to the Board that sundry droves of Cattle are about to be sent out of this State, particularly from the County of Johnston, to Virginia and the Northern States, at a time when the Army in the Southern Department are in the greatest distress for provisions of every kind, the Board, at the same time feeling for the Inconveniences of Individuals, are under the Necessity to use every Expedient to procure Supplies and to prohibit all Cattle from being drove out of the State as aforesaid, do therefore order and direct that the Commissioner of provision Supplies in the County wherein such Cattle are do repair to the Owners of the same and endeavour to purchase them; and on their Refusal to sell, to immediately impress them, conforming himself to the Act of Assembly in such Case made, and have them drove to the Head Quarters of the Army, or such place as shall be directed by the Board of War. Should there not be a Commissioner appointed for the County wherein such Cattle are, the Justices are hereby required without delay to proceed to the appointment of one, that this Order of the Board be not eluded which is so necessary to be carried into speedy Execution.

Ordered that a Copy of the foregoing be sent Colonel Samuel Smith of Johnston, with a Request from the Board that it be speedily carried into Execution.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Colonel Thomas Browne:

Sir:

Yours per Express the Board have received, and tho' a great number of Cattle are wanted for the immediate use of the Army

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in the upper parts of the Country, and for the purpose of Salting up, yet as you are ordered out by the Governor, together with your County's quota of Militia, to join General Harrington, we cannot undertake to direct you on a separate Service, but refer you on this Head to General Harrington; should he think it in your power to render more essential Service in collecting Cattle than otherwise, the Board would have no objection. The Cattle which you may have already collected, or any you may possibly collect in future, will be delivered to Mr. Thomas Amis or Order, who is appointed Superintendent for Wilmington District.

———


Thursday, 9th November, 1780.

An Order given Captain Edmonson for Leather for a pair Half Boots.

Received a Letter from Brigr. General Butler, enclosing a List of his Brigade. Filed No. 83.

The Board of War, being attentive to the commercial Interest in General of this State, and desirous that the Owners or Masters of Vessels, who bona fide have imported or who shall import Salt or other necessary Articles of Commerce for sale into any Port of this State, should be permitted to purchase a Supply of Provisions sufficient for the Maintenance and Support of themselves and Crews for their future Voyage, do therefore direct and recommend in such Cases that the Intention of such Owner, Factor or Master be first ascertained on Oath, and an Estimate of such provisions necessary as aforesaid be made out and lodged with the Naval Officer of the Port where such Vessel lies, and also with the Commissioner of provision Supplies for the County where the Provisions are to be purchased as aforesaid, that then the County Commissioner or Commissioners aforesaid, or other persons contracting for the Army, shall forbear to impress or intermeddle with such Provisions procured, or which shall be procured, for that purpose.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Colonel Robert Burton, Granville, Superintendent of the County Commissioners, Halifax District:

-------------------- page 456 --------------------

Sir:

The Board have no account from Caswell, Franklin and Edgecomb Counties. No supplies have arrived from thence. Wheat is much wanted for the Hospital, which you will please to have procured with all dispatch. The Number of Waggons we wrote you some time since we have not heard of; they must be had at all events to forward the public Stores and carry provisions to this place; they are not to follow the Camp, which may ease the Owners' Fears. We have directed Colonel Carrington, at Taylor's Ferry, to call on you for 15 Waggons to carry the public Stores from thence to this post; they must be impressed immediately if you cannot procure them otherwise. We recommend to you to have Coopers employed in every County in making Barrels to salt up Beef, if they may be had from the Militia, whose service in this Business for Three Months will be deemed a Tour of Duty provided they produce Ninety Barrels.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Colonel Carrington:

Sir:

Yours to Mr. Penn was handed the Board a few days ago. We are desirous that the Stores mentioned in your Letter should be forwarded to this place with the utmost expedition; and for this purpose have directed Colonel Burton of Granville, Superintendent Commissary, to furnish you with 15 Waggons as soon as possible, whom you will please to call upon to aid you with that number. We wish that Virginia could furnish the Army with a few more Waggons, as North Carolina is greatly distressed on that account.

———


Friday, 11th November, 1780.

Received a Letter from Dr. Wilson, Commissioner of Mecklenburg, requesting a supply of Salt. Filed No. 84.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent the Commissioners of Trade:

Gentlemen:

From various consultations with the commander-in-chief we are convinced that it is a matter of the last importance to have all

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the Salt belonging to the Publick, which may be at any of the Sea Ports or low down the Country, moved up into the interior parts; from Wilmington it must be moved up to Cross Creek; from New Bern up into the Neighbourhood of Johnston Court House; from Washington or parts adjacent, to Tarborough, and from Edenton to Halifax. The Commissioners will easily see the expediency, and indeed the absolute Necessity, of this Measure, for our Army will in all probability remain in the upper part of the Country the greatest part of the Winter, whence it follows that our chief magasines of salted provisions must be high up in the Country, Hillsborough probably our grand one; Cross Creek, Johnston Court House, Tarborough and Halifax are places that large quantities must be salted up at, from whence, with more Convenience, provisions may be transported to distant parts of the Country.

This Business the Board are in hopes will be attended to immediately, as the Season for Salting up provisions is now at hand. Salt may be conveyed to all the places aforementioned in Boats, which the Commissioners will have impressed, hired or otherwise procured. Inclosed you have a Certificate from under the Hand of Mr. John Stewart, ascertaining the quantity of Tobacco delivered to Mr. Borwitz in consequence of an order from B. Hawkins, Esqr., then Commercial Agent, by which you will plainly see that there is an Error in Mr. Borwitz's Settlement with the Assembly. The Board therefore think it necessary that you should delay advancing the 175,000 lbs. of Tobacco as ordered by the Assembly until this matter shall be re investigated at the next Session. The Board are extremely solicitous to have Supplies sent to the Officers and Soldiers belonging to this State who are in captivity at Charlestown. Clothes and some other Articles are coming on from Philadelphia, but Linen is wanted most. If that can be procured by any possible means on the Credit of the State the price must not be regarded. Perhaps four Hogsheads of Tobacco would be useful to our Officers, if they might go with other Supplies under a Flag.

Received from General Harrington a Letter of the 3rd and a Letter of the 5 November, enclosing a Copy of a Letter from Ld. Cornwallis to Colonel Tynes. Filed No. 85.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent His Excellency, Governor Nash:

-------------------- page 458 --------------------

Sir:

By the last accounts from the western army Lord Cornwallis is between the Wateree and Congaree Rivers, opposite to Rocky Mount, collecting the Provisions in that quarter. Others say he hath divided his Army into two columns and hath marched one towards Wilmington; the other towards Charlestown. However, from Genl. Harrington's account, they are fortifying at Camden, from whence you can draw your own conclusions. General Smallwood is about fifteen Miles below Charlotte, waiting for the Reinforcements of the Regulars who marched from this place the Second Instant to the amount of one Thousand men, consisting of the Maryland, Delaware and Buford's Virginia Corps. General Gates set off with 130 Horse last Monday after them. General Stevens is here with about 500 naked Virginians, without arms and every other Necessary; but we hear arms have arrived for them at Roanoke. We expect here every day General Green, who supersedes General Gates, as by the last Advice received from our Delegates in Congress.

Your Excellency will find by the Letters of Generals Butler and Harrington the Necessity of immediate drafts to supply the place of those Militia whose Time will expire according to these Returns. Major O'Neal, the Bearer of this, will bring up your Orders to the Hillsborough and Salisbury Districts on this particular. Rowan and Mecklenburg ought to be spared as much as possible, whose Militia have chiefly been on duty. We have no certain accounts of the movements of the British in Virginia, which you are no doubt better acquainted with than we are; should they continue, tho', we cannot expect much assistance from Edenton and Newbern Districts, of which your Excellency will be the Judge. We are well acquainted with the difficulties attending the Collection of the Specific Tax. By Impressment and some purchases the Army have hitherto been maintained. General Gates did expect that this State would wholly support the Army as to Provisions, but this the Board have undeceived him in. His contractors, on Continental Credit, however, have purchased a considerable Number of Cattle in different parts. We wish to appoint a Comm'r General to collect and forward the Provisions to the different Posts, provided a proper person could be had, but we know not where to find him. Persons are

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wanted in the meanwhile much to superintend the County Commissioners of New Berne and Edenton Districts. We should be glad to receive Recommendations of persons proper for this purpose. General Smallwood hath urged the Expediency at this Juncture of Issuing a Proclamation of Pardon to the Tories, who, from their late Treatment from the British, distress him by surrendering themselves daily, and he believes would generally come in was there any Encouragement. As this concerns the civil Government of North and South Carolina, we wish your Excellency would consult your Council, as also Governor Rutledge, as to the propriety of such a Measure, which, we confess, is somewhat delicate at this time. Should you think it proper, we beg leave to recommend that you preclude all persons in Allegiance with these States who have borne Commissions in their Service. The Commissioners of Trade are wrote respecting the public Salt, part of which we wish to have conveyed up the Country to Johnston Court House, to Halifax, &c., with the utmost Dispatch. A Number of Letters are here from different parts for Governor Rutledge, particularly from Congress, but we know not where to direct to him. One Packet with money we sent to Mr. Hooper's, in Wilmington, but there were no accounts of him there.

Pray, is the Board of War to be filled up or not? We shall rise and proceed to the Westward shortly. If it is your pleasure to add to it Colonel Henderson and any other you please, it will give us great Relief.

You have a number of Letters from different persons.

An Order given on Captain Vernon, Cross Creek, for One Hundred Bushels Salt, to be delivered Ephram Farr for the Use of the Commissioner of Mecklenburg County and the Army in that Quarter.

An Order given Captain Gardner for a Pair of Boots.

———


Saturday, 11th November, 1780.

An Order given Ensign Rezin for a pair of Shoes.

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Sunday, 12th November, 1780.

An Order for Twenty-five Bushels Salt given in favour of Philip Vass, County Commissioner, Granville.

Received a Letter from His Excellency, A. Nash, Esquire, adjourning the Board from Hillsborough to Halifax. Filed No. 86.

Received a Letter from the Honorable Major General Gates. Filed No. 87.

Received a Letter from the County Commissioner of Granville. Filed No. 88.

Received a Letter from the Honorable Whitmell Hill, Esquire Filed No. 89.

Received a Letter from the County Commissioner of Cumberland. Filed No. 90.

Received a Letter from Nicholas Long, Esquire. Filed No. 91.

———


Monday, 13th November, 1780.

An Order given in favour of the Commissioner of Cumberland for 50 Bushels Salt.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Colonel Long:

Sir:

Yours by Mr. Miller was handed us yesterday. Time will further discover the interesting Intelligence it contains respecting the Fleet off Charlestown. We have nothing certain from Lord Cornwallis since his being between the Wateree and Congaree Rivers, opposite Rocky Mount, collecting provisions. By General Harrington we learn about 400 British were fortifying Camden; whether they mean to hold that place as a post is uncertain. General Smallwood is at 6 Miles Creek, 15 Miles below Charlotte, waiting for General Gates's Reinforcement, which by this time must have joined him, before any considerable Operations will be attempted. The Board are much pleased with your Conduct in seizing the Cattle which were about to be drove out of the State, so much wanted at present by the Army, which under like circumstances for the future will always meet with our approbation;

-------------------- page 461 --------------------
we would recommend that the County Commissioner give the Owner the proper Certificates, according to the Act of Assembly. General Gates hath ordered on all the Stores in this place to Camp, except some Long Ells we stopped for our Soldiers here, as also those from New Bern purchased by his Bills. Mr. Pasteur is surely mistaken; we have not ordered anything as yet out out of his possession; he hath, thro' mistake perhaps, sent our State Stores with the Continental, which will make great confusion; the Commander-in-chief will seize the whole indiscriminately till this be ascertained.

John Walker, Isaac Johnson, and Joseph Ruth, discharged from Confinement on their obliging themselves to perform their Tour of duty. Capt. Hines, Walker's surety; John Johnson's surety; Isaac Johnson, Sup.; Wm. Deaton and Captain Hinds, Ruth's surety.

Drury Brewer discharged from Confinement on his engaging to serve 3 Months under Colo. Lutrell, Fox Palmer Surety, Chatham.

Received a Letter from Mr. George Fletcher. Filed No. 92.

Received a Letter from John Webb, Esqr. Filed No. 93.

Ordered that the following be made out and delivered Colonel Lutrell:

Whereas, it is represented to the Board by Colonel Lutrell that from recent applications to him made and from other circumstances, he is induced to believe that he could (if authorized) raise one Hundred and Fifty or Two Hundred volunteers who would engage for a tour of Militia Service under him for at least 3 Months; the Board, therefore, considering the same, do hereby authorize and impower Colonel Lutrell to engage on a Tour of duty as aforesaid, under Militia Regulations, any Number not exceeding Two Hundred, and that, should he meet with success in this undertaking, the Board will grant him a Lieutenant Colonel's Commission, together with proper officers under him, and Colonel Lutrell will have leave and permission to include in his Corps such Militia Delinquents, who, being sensible of their Error, are willing to become good and orderly Citizens, and do their duty when lawfully called on, taking care by all means to exclude all such who have been guilty of Thefts, Robberies or Misdemeanours, or who have borne Arms against the State, and to apprehend all such and have them sent to Jail.

-------------------- page 462 --------------------

Tuesday, 14th November, 1780.

Received a Letter from Robert Rowan, Esq. Filed No. 94.

Received a Letter from Col. Long. Filed No. 95.

Received a Letter from John Webb, Esqr. Filed No. 96.

Received a Letter from John Whitley, Comr. Johnston County. Filed No. 97.

An Order for 75 Bushels Salt given in favour of John Whitley, Commissioner.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent R. Rowan:

Sir:

Yours of the 9th of this inst. by Doctor Ingram was presented to the Board; we wish you had been more particular as to an Invoice of the Articles sent here. Your Letter of the 28th ultimo mentions the Salt, Molasses, Duck and Shoes only. The Quarter Master had on hand upwards of 30 pieces blue Long Ells, and sundry other articles which he informed us came from you; this we would be glad to know. Agreeable to your desire a Waggon with a Guard attends you to bring to this place all the Cloathing you have on hand made up. Shoe Leather is much wanted here. You will mention this subject to Mr. Cochran, and if he can spare any you will please barter Hides with him at the usual rates, which we submit to you, and make up the remainder of the Load of the Waggon with the same. If you have any Shoes on hand you will send them forward.

Received a Letter from Colonel Martin Armstrong, Surry.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Colonel Martin Armstrong:

Sir:

Yours this Evening was handed the Board by Mr. Houzar, and with astonishment and real Concern we mark the Contents. We know not by what authority you, as Colonel of the Militia of Surry County, should undertake to issue proclamations of pardon and promise to use your Influence thereon, to set at large 500 Traitors, or at least Prisoners of War, without consulting the Supreme powers of this State previously on that Subject, so easy to be done without the Necessity of involving yourself in the many difficulties that perhaps may ensue from this rash Action. Why was not

-------------------- page 463 --------------------
General Gates, the Contl. Commander; why was not Gen. Smallwood, the Commander of the Militia, consulted, that uniform proceedings might be throughout the State? Is not this exposing the weakness of our Government, and really evincing to the Neighboring States that we have none, but that we are in anarchy and Confusion and governed by a Mob without any regular System or plan, when every Officer undertakes Matters of Government as he pleases?

The Orders were positive and repeated to the Commanding Officers of the prisoners from Gen. Gates by our advice to send the Prisoners on to Fincastle, or other safe places in Virginia, there to be kept 'til Congress could be consulted thereon. A general Cartel is, we are told, with much difficulty lately effected. An exchange of Prisoners is to be had, Soldier for Soldier, Militia for Militia, & Citizen for Citizen. We appeal to your own feelings, and to every Officer in that Council, in behalf of our suffering Friends in Charlestown; how are we to expect to relieve them from their Confinement? Should we be successful and retake that place, they will then send them off to the West Indies, out of our power, there to rot and die in Gaols. Can we ever expect by these Indulgences to make these Villains, after 6 years' Trial, better men than our Captive Friends in Charlestown, whom we know and have tried? With what assurance will our Militia take the field when there is no probability of an Exchange should the fortune of War put them in the Enemy's power? We flatter ourselves to have had General Rutherford and Two Hundred and Forty Six rank and file of Militia returned to us for Ferguson's Prisoners, but this hope is entirely blasted. Perhaps it may be urged that General Rutherford issued a Proclamation at Ramsour's and dismissed prisoners. Our Officers were on a different Footing at that period with our Enemies than at present; the Enemy had four of our Militia in their possession at that Time, but the late defeat hath given them upwards of 500 No. and So. Carolinians, whom they would be glad to exchange for our Tory Prisoners to put on Board their War Ships, alledging with reason to them that they had freed them from prison with Rebels brought them, and of Course they were their property. Should they then run from them, as undoubtedly they would, we then might shew Indulgences with good policy. We are distressed, Sir, on the Subject, and know

-------------------- page 464 --------------------
not what advice to give you, as our intended Measures thereon are totally disconcerted. We shall lay your Letter before the Governor and Council and transmit the same to Congress.

However, Sir, we do not cast the whole Blame at your door. You are the ostensible officer only whom the Public will cast the first Censure on. Time perhaps may unravel this dark, mysterious Affair and bring to Light Matters you are not privy to, which we are sensible the Honesty and Goodness of your Heart would revolt at and detest with abhorrence.

———


Wednesday, 15th November, 1780.

Received a Letter from Colonel Lutrell. Filed No. 98.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Colonel John Lutrell:

Sir:

Your Letter of the 14th Inst. was delivered by Mr. Hines. We have ordered him as many Cartridges as he can conveniently carry. Respecting McFerson and his plundering party, it will perhaps be best to go in quest of them first, and afterwards act as Circumstances shall require. The Board depend much on your Intrepidity and Activity. As soon as McFerson and his Banditti may be discomfited you will push after McNeal and his Adherents and other Insurgents. You may leave an officer or two behind, on whom you can depend to compleat the plan of raising your new Corps.

Ordered that the following be made out and sent Colonel Burton, Granville:

Sir:

As the Board of War is adjourned from this place to Halifax, your attendance at this post becomes absolutely necessary, or otherwise there will be no person to call on the County Commissioners for their Supplies, and compel them to produce the same at the several Magazines of their Counties, which to have brought from thence to this place for the use of the Army will be your immediate duty, as also to superintend the Barrelling up of the public Beef; otherwise, without your attention, this Business will

-------------------- page 465 --------------------
certainly suffer. You will please to consult Mr. Taylor on this subject, who is issuing Commissary. In short, Sir, on you will depend the whole support of this Post.

———


Thursday, 16th November, 1780.

The following sent to Mr. George Fletcher:

Sir:

Yours by Doctor Ingram we received, and what we expected you have explained—that what Cattle Colonel Brown has collected for the State, as by particular orders to him directed for that purpose alone, you have received as a Continental Contractor, and mean to draw your Commissions thereon accordingly. Colo. Brown informs us you have received Two Hundred and Fifty-Nine Head of Cattle from Him on account of the State. Your assumption we release you from, as you might assume to pay for all the State Cattle that arrive here from the different parts thereof with the same propriety. Colonel Brown's Orders are to collect from out of the Enemies' Grounds Cattle; and therefore his Collections are not for you or any other person to merchandize upon.

At present, Sir, you are not to consider yourself as acting under any authority of the Board of War, except that of issuing Commissary. Mr. Travers is the County Commissioner who is to collect the specific Tax according to Law, and in cases of necessity impress provisions and any other Articles wanted for the Army.

Received a Letter from John Williams, County Commissioner, Caswell. Filed No. 99.

Received a Letter from Nicholas Long, Esqr. Filed No. 100.

Received a Letter from Mr. J. Ramsey, Com'r. Filed No. 101.

Received from Colonel Lutrell Gov. Nash's Plan and Regulations for recruiting a Regiment of Highlanders, &c., &c. Filed No. 102.

Received a Letter from Mr. Thomas Amis, Super't Commissary, Wilmington District. Filed No. 103.

-------------------- page 466 --------------------


Friday, 17th November, 1780.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Mr. Thomas Amis:

Sir:

Yours, p'r Express, the Board have received, and are glad to find you have been so active, especially in collecting Beeves. You will, as soon as may be after the Receipt of this, send forward to Salisbury Two Hundred Head of Cattle, or thereabouts. Whatever you may collect afterwards the Board desire may be slaughtered and barrelled up at Cross Creek until further orders, together with such quantities of Pork as you may be able to procure. Inclosed you have an order on any Commissary or Quarter Master to supply you with public Salt. This is the Mode intended by the Act respecting the Supply of that Article. And as to Spirits and long Forage not being enumerated in the Act, we can give no direct Orders concerning them. The Board have great dependence on your Industry and activity in the victualing Department, for on this all finally depends. You will keep every possible Spring in motion. Be sure to attend to the Article of Barrels. The Board will rise next week, and sit at Halifax again the 1st December.

An Order issued in favour of Thomas Amis for One Hundred Bushels Salt.

Whereas, many good and well-affected people of the County of Orange, since the passage of an Act of the General Assembly respecting the Specific Tax, have had their Corn Fields taken and their Grain impressed from them for the Use of the Army, The Board of War, desirous to relieve such persons, Do direct and order the County Commissioner of Orange that, where proper vouchers of such persons coming under the above description are produced to him, that he grant a Certificate for the quantity of grain taken as aforesaid, which shall be taken in discharge of their Specific or pecuniary Tax, so far as it may be sufficient to discharge the same.

An Order given Doctor Brown for one pair of Boots and one pair Shoes.

An Order given Doctor Reid for two pairs Shoes, one pair for his Servant.

-------------------- page 467 --------------------

An Order given Captain Dorsey for mending his Chair, Harness and Bridle Reins.

———


Saturday, 18th November, 1780.

Received a Letter from Mr. Pendergrast. Filed No. 104.

Received a Letter from the Honorable Major General Gates. Filed No. 105.

Received a Letter from Alexander Long, Commissioner of Rowan County. Filed No. 106.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Brigadier General Harrington:

Yours of the 3d and 5th Instant were received p'r Express on the 11th, and an answer sent by the same Hand the next day, but unfortunately it has fallen into the Enemy's Hands; the cowardly Rascal suffered himself to be robbed of all his papers, &c., by a single armed Man, near Drowning Creek, and returned to this place yesterday. Inclosed we send you a Copy of our Letter interrupted as above. It will be a valuable acquisition to the Enemy. How shall we counteract its effects? The Major part of the Troops here, consisting of Virginia Regulars and Militia, march for Head Quarters To-morrow. No extraordinary Maneouvre of the Enemy in Virginia; they lie pretty still about Portsmouth. Reports say they will be shortly reinforced from N. York. This looks like a grand Exertion for plundering in the Southern States this Winter. The last accounts from our Head Quarters near Charlotte inform that General Sumpter a few days ago had a small Rencounter with the Enemy; he took Major Wimms and Twenty-five Prisoners, and killed about a dozen, with the loss of four Men killed and Ten wounded. Captain Jones, who has charge of this, together with Captain King, will reinforce your Posts with between Sixty and Eighty Militia Cavalry.

The Board will rise in a few days, and are to sit at Halifax 1st December.

An Order given in favour of Alexander Long, County Commissioner of Rowan, for One Hundred and Twenty Bushels Salt.

-------------------- page 468 --------------------

An Order issued on Robert Rowan, Esquire, for twenty-five Bushels Salt for public use at Hillsboro.

Received a Letter from Doctor Williamson. Filed No. 107.

Received a Letter from Colonel Thos. Wade. Filed No. 108.

Received a Letter from Colonel T. Polk. Filed No. 109.

Received a Letter from Bignall and Hawkins. Filed No. 110.

Received a Letter from General Gates. Filed No. 111.

Received a Letter from Captain Yarborough. Filed No. 112.

Received a Letter from Martin Armstrong. Filed No. 113.

Received a Letter from Robert Rowan, Esqr. Filed No. 114.

Received a Letter from Governor Rutledge. No. 115.

———


Sunday, 19th November, 1780.

Monday, 20th November, 1780.

Tuesday, 21st November, 1780.

Thursday, 22nd November, 1780.

Received a Letter from Colonel Wade. Filed No. 116.

Received a Letter from General Gates. Filed 117.

———


Friday, 23rd November, 1780.

Received a Letter from Colonel Brown. Filed No. 118.

———


Saturday, 24th November, 1780.

Received a Letter from E. Gamble. Filed No. 119.

———


Sunday, 25th November, 1780.

Received a Letter from Colonel Davie. Filed No. 120.

Received a Letter from Genl. Harrington. Filed No. 121.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent General Butler:

Sir:

Whereas, Complaints have been made that Captain Hardwick and other Militia Officers of Rowan County, with their Companies, have unlawfully and feloniously plundered and robbed

-------------------- page 469 --------------------
sundry peaceable people of this State of their property under the pretence of their being Tories and Enemies to their Country, and converted the same to their own use in open violation of the Laws of this State, thereby reflecting a disgrace on themselves unworthy of the Officer as well as any Citizen of the same. And, whereas, it hath been represented that a certain Captain Starns hath committed a late barbarous and cruel Murder on the Body of a certain Michal Chrisman, under the same pretence, disgraceful to a free Country where the Laws, when duly executed, are sufficient to compel all offenders to be amenable to the same.

By virtue of special powers in me vested by the Board of War, I do hereby call upon you to be aiding and assisting to the Civil Magistrates in apprehending such Offenders that further proceedings may be had against them in the Courts of Law to bring them to punishment. In the meanwhile I beg leave to recommend that you put them in arrest, and order Courts Martial to hear and determine all such charges exhibited against their Military Conduct as Officers, who, upon finding the Facts true, will have it in their power to break all such, with your approbation, as unworthy of holding a Commission any longer under this State, or otherwise discharge the same.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent the County Commissioners:

Whereas, a Number of Persons, since the Arrival of the British in South Carolina and in this State, have left their plantations and Families and joined them, leaving on their said Plantations all the Grain and Stock which, by the traitorous Conduct of the Owners, become liable to Forfeiture, and which, properly secured, would be necessary for the Support of our Army; and whereas many thro' Fear of the Enemy, have deserted their plantations and left their Grain and Stock as above, which will be loss to the Owners as well to the publick without being secured, The Board, taking the same under Consideration, do order and direct the County Commissioners in both cases to take into possession all such abdicated provisions for the use of the Army, leaving a sufficiency, where Women and children are left, for their support in the first Instance; and in the second, where friendly persons shall return and occupy their said plantations, they shall be entitled to have refunded to them so much Provisions, equal to the Support of their

-------------------- page 470 --------------------
said Families, if so much should be taken, deducting therefrom his or their Specific tax, otherwise equivalent to the quantity taken, deducting his Specific Tax as aforesaid, provided they return before the first day of January next; and all County Commissioners are also required to keep particular Accounts of such Provisions taken as aforesaid, and render the same on oath, that a proper saving be made to the State.

———


Monday, 26th November, 1780.

An Order given Capt. Bell, Commissioner of Randolf County, for Thirty Bushels Salt.

An order given in favour of Alexander Long, Commissioner of Rowan County, for 25 Bushels Salt.

An Order given in favour of A. Long, Commissioner, Rowan County, for Twenty-five Bushels Salt.

———


Wednesday, 28th November, 1780.

An Order given David Wilson, Commissioner of Mecklenburg County, for One Hundred Bushels of Salt.

Received a Letter from Thomas Amis, Superintendent Commissary, Wilmington. Filed No. 122.

———


Thursday, 29th November, 1780.

An Order given in favour of Robert Alexander, Commissioner of Tryon County, for 100 Bushels Salt.

———


Friday, 30th November, 1780.

An Order given in favour of Alexander Long for Twenty Bushels Salt.

-------------------- page 471 --------------------

Saturday, 1st December, 1780.

Received a Letter from Gov. Nash. Filed No. 123.

Received a Letter from Alexander Long, Comr. of Rowan County. Filed No. 124.

———


Halifax, Sunday, 2nd December, 1780.

Received a Letter from General Smallwood. Filed No. 125.

Received a Letter from General Harrington. Filed No. 126.

Received a Letter from Colonel Malmedy. Filed No. 127.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent His Excellency, Governor Nash:

Sir:

Your last Letter adjourning the Board of War to this place was received by them at Hillsborough on the 12th Ulto., previous to which Colonel Martin, from the Solicitation of the Commanderin-Chief, had concluded to go to the Westward as far as headquarters, in order to confer with General Smallwood respecting a further Aid of Militia, and the intended operations of the Army, together with the Arrangements and regulations necessary to be made in the Victualling department, which last matter alone will require great efforts to provide for adequately. Colonel Martin left Hillsborough on the 15th, and promised to be here between the 1st and 10th Inst. I left it myself on the 22nd and am here alone, Mr. Penn, from a severe illness, having been unable to attend the duties of his Appointment.

Major Mountflorence, who will have the honor to deliver this to you, together with sundry packets from the Northward, has some propositions to make to your Excellency respecting the raising a Regt. of Militia Cavalry, to be commanded by Colonel Davie, who at present is without Command. The Regiment wishes to be composed of 6 Troops only, which are intended to be incorporated with a Regiment of Light Infantry, forming thereby a kind of Legion. General Smallwood is anxious to retain Colonel Davie in the service, and so also am I, having a high Idea of his Military Merit; but I fear there are obstacles unsurmountable against this scheme of Militia Cavalry. If the horses are small they answer no purpose; and stout, strong Horses are not to be had but by

-------------------- page 472 --------------------
impressment, and greater Evils would result therefrom than any probable Service could compensate for. Should their Time of Service in the Field be shortened, and each man required to find his Horse, still the arming and equipping them would be difficult.

It will, I suppose, be necessary for your Excellency to order a Draft for Hillsborough and Salisbury Districts of their proportion of four thousand Men; Halifax District is a draft in advance, if I may use the expression. It was ordered by General Eaton, and intended to act against the Enemy in Virginia; but that State being now entirely clear of them, this draft of course must move to the Westward. They are to rendezvous at Franklin Court House on the 14th Inst. and are intended to supply the places of General Jones' late Brigade, whose Tour of Service will expire on the 28th Inst. General Butler's Brigade for Hillsboro District will be discharged on the 15th Inst., and so also I suppose will the Men from Salisbury district.

We have a small supply of Cloth, Trimmings, Linen, &c., just come to Hand from Philadelphia for our Officers in Charles Town. As soon as a Flag can be in readiness to run round, these Articles shall be sent down to New Berne. Intelligence from the Northward informs that another Embarkment has taken place at New York, supposed for Charles Town. I refer you to Major Mountflorence for particulars from the Westward.

———


Halifax, Monday, 3rd December, 1780.

Received a Letter from Robert Bignall, Esquire, Comr. of Trade. Filed No. 128.

———


Halifax, Tuesday, 4th December, 1780,
&
Wednesday, 5th December, 1780.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent His Excellency, Gov. Nash:

Sir:

When I wrote you last by Major Mountflorence I had no idea

-------------------- page 473 --------------------
of being necessitated to trouble you on Business of this kind. The first of last Week I ordered off three waggons to Tarborough (or lower down the Tar River if necessary) for public Salt, for the purpose of furnishing, agreeable to Law, the Commissioners of the Counties adjacent to this, having had repeated applications for the same. These Waggons returned last Night with a Letter from Mr. Bignall, acquainting me that there was no public Salt on any part of the Tar River worth mentioning, nor indeed any where else in the State under the immediate direction of the Commissioners of Trade; that Colonel Leech, some small time ago, bartered away one thousand three Hundred Bushels of public Salt which lay at the Fork of Tar River. I am astonished and confounded to know what expedient to fall on for an adequate Supply of this Article. The Commanding Officer has again and again reiterated to the Board the absolute Necessity of procuring and laying up at least Six Thousand Barrels of salted provisions for the ensuing Campaign. This is meant as an Estimate for the Supply of 6,000 Men Six Months; and assuredly the salvation of this State depends in some measure on this Supply. Your Excellency, by a Letter addressed to the Board some time ago, (if I may make a remark,) has undoubtedly a perfect idea of the difficulty attending the Supplying our Army with Provisions, &c., but the Want of Salt will infallibly overturn and annihilate all our Schemes of Supplies without Searching for other Obstructions. Is there not Salt enough in New Bern? Can it be obtained on the Credit of the State? If not it must be impressed. Shall the independence of this State be endangered by the Want of a few Thousand Bushels of Salt? Your Excellency will pardon me if I am thus explicit and importunate, because I am well aware that, without your Orders, Interposition of the Salt will not be procured. Some one of the Commissioners of Trade will wait on you, and if your Ideas correspond with mine Your Excellency will give the necessary directions. The moment this Express returns five Waggons shall be immediately sent off to New Bern for Salt, if it can be had. Five Hundred Barrels of Pork might be procured for the Publick in this County, if the Commissioner can be in a little time supplied with salt; otherwise we must lose the whole of it. Intelligence this day from the Westward informs that Colonel Tarleton a few days ago fell in with General Sumpter's
-------------------- page 474 --------------------
Troops, and after a sharp rencounter got off with the loss of ninety Dragoons killed on the spot and 70 taken Prisoners, Tarleton himself said to be mortally wounded twice in the Body and his Thigh broke; General Sumpter also badly wounded. This news I have not officially, but it seems to come from pretty good authority.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent the Commissioners of Trade:

Gentlemen:

Whereas, General Green hath given Orders to all those who have Continental Salt in possession in Wilmington, Cross Creek and Newbern to furnish Colonel Thomas Polk, Superintending Commissary of the District of Salisbury, with such quantities thereof as he may send for, to be applied to the use of the Army; And, whereas, Colonel Polk hath employed Thirty Waggons for this purpose, to answer the immediate Exigencies thereof, it will be necessary to have the same loaded with State Salt, should there not be a Sufficiency of Continental in the possession of the persons aforesaid. You will, therefore, please to load such Waggons of the aforesaid Thirty, of which you will have notice from the Quarter Master, with Twenty Bushels of State Salt each, should there be not a sufficiency of continental for the purposes aforesaid.

———


Halifax, Thursday, 6th December, 1780.
to
Monday, 10th December, 1780.

Received a Letter from Colonel Long. Filed No. 129.

Received a Letter from Martin Armstrong. Filed No. 130.

———


Tuesday, 11th December, 1780,
to
Thursday, 13th December, 1780.

Received a Letter from Colo. Polk. Filed No. 131.

Received a Letter from B. Hawkins, Esq. Filed No. 132.

Received a Letter from Colo. Malmedy. Filed No. 133.

-------------------- page 475 --------------------

Friday, Halifax, 14th December, 1780,
to
Monday, 17th December, 1780.

Received a Letter from Colonel Gunby. Filed No. 134.

Received a Letter from Colonel Polk. Filed No. 135.

Received a Letter from Governor Nash. Filed No. 136.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent His Excellency, Governor Nash:

Sir:

Yours of the 10th Inst. I have the honor to acknowledge the Receipt of; the reading of it pains and distresses me. I am conscious of no Expression of Irreverence or implied Censure on your Conduct in my last Letter, nor can I suppose your Excellency will impute to me a wish or an intention to retrench from your authority or Prerogatives; and I am sure (I speak for myself) that I have made use of no Acts nor undue Methods to enhance the Respect due to the Board or occasion a diminution of that due to our first Magistrate. In my own person I can possibly have no views of ostentatious Greatness and Glare in public Trappings, abstracted from the public Good. I ask it as a favour of your Excellency to read over my Letter of the 5th Inst. dispassionately; it will surely appear to you dictated in a supplicating rather than a criminating or imperative Style; I at least intended it so. Your Excellency must plainly perceive my Situation to be very disagreeable; alone I am to do the Business, and answer for all the Consequences. I am to request your Excellency immediately by Proclamation to prohibit the Exportation of Provisions of all kinds from any part of this State, except such as may be sold or bartered by the Commissioners of Trade or their Agents for the Article of Salt alone. In my Letter of the second Inst. I mentioned to you the Expediency of ordering out Aids of Militia from Hillsborough and Salisbury Districts. In yours of the 10th nothing is said respecting those Aids. I am told none of the men from Edenton district of the last draft have marched; you will give the necessary orders respecting them. The Board intended the Drafts of the Three towns districts to take Post on Pedee, under General Harrington. I cannot undertake to define the Method most proper to adopt for procuring a sufficiency of Salt for the Public, but the Board will give sanction to

-------------------- page 476 --------------------
any which shall tend to furnish the quantity wanted. I have written to each of the Commissioners of Trade on the Subject.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent B. Hawkins, Esq.:

Sir:

I have received yours of the 10 inst., and am not a Little embarrassed respecting its Contents. To define the most eligible Plan for procuring a Sufficiency of Salt for the Publick is what I cannot do; but if other Sources fail or are unequal, Impressment must be made use of. It is clear that our Specific Provisions act looks for an adequate supply of public Salt from the Hands of the Commissioners of Trade; it remains with the Board to Order the Application. In a Letter to the Governor, of the same date with yours, in my Judgment there is a valuable Hint respecting the appointment of Agents at each of the Posts of Wilmington, Newbern, Edenton, &c., which will receive considerable Aid by a Proclamation prohibiting the Exportation of Provisions of every kind except by the Commissioners of Trade, &c. The Nomination of the Agents is left to yourself; in the meantime, in person or by Deputy, you will make it a point to seize and impress the Salt belonging to persons who are presuming to barter or sell the same for Provisions, whether at any port or in the interior parts of the State; again, others who have apparently speculated in that Article should by all means be made Victims. At Edenton, Daileys and parts adjacent there is Salt coming under this description, if I am informed right, send an Agent into those parts. We shall want for public use not less I think than Four Thousand Bushels. You will pay no Respect to any other Business and devote your whole attention in obtaining the Necessary Supply of Salt. I have Written to Mr. Bignall on the Subject, requesting his Exertions in this Behalf. The Impressment Business being left to the Commissary General will not answer; indeed, I do not know the man. Mr. Craike thinks himself out of Office. The Waggons I send down for Salt; dispatch them off as soon as may be.

Accounts from the Northward say that General Leslie and the British Troops from Virginia have arrived in New York.

Received a Letter from Gov. Nash. Filed No. 136.

-------------------- page 477 --------------------

Ordered, that the Following be made out and sent Robert Bignall, Esq.:

Sir:

I am to acknowledge the Receipt of yours of the 11th Inst, and with Anxiety I must inform you that I have just received Letters from the Governor and Mr. Hawkins without satisfactory Accounts about Salt; the Express who will deliver you this has Letters for them still on the same subject. I have queste'd Mr. Hawkins to lay aside every other scheme and devote his whole attention to this of procuring Salt, and earnestly I must make the same Requisition to you. I am aware that it will greatly derange your commercial schemes for public Benefit, but necessity dictates the Measure. I have directed Mr. Hawkins to make a point of seizing and impressing al the Salt which any person shall presume to barter for Provisions, and have also requested the Governor to prohibit the Exportation of Provisions of all kinds, except such as may be bartered with the Commissioners of Trade; this will aid you a little. Let me ask you to strain every nerve in this affair. Think we shall want not less than 4,000 Bushels for public use. I am to request of you to spare Mr. Hall, Commissioner for your County, Fifty Bushels or a less Quantity if it will suffice.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent the County Commissioners:

Whereas, many well-affected persons, Subjects of this State, since the passage of the late act of Assembly for granting supplies to the Army have had provisions and Forage impressed and taken from them by Quarter Masters and others appointed by Commanding Officers to procure Provisions for the same, whose Certificates ought to discharge the Speeific Tax of such persons having the same, so far as they are sufficient for that purpose; the Board of War, desirous to relieve such persons coming under the above description, do direct that the County Commissioners, on having proper Vouchers proceeded to them of Provisions and Forage impressed and taken as aforesaid since the 13th of Septemper last, shall grant a Certificate to him or them for the same, which may be received by such Commissioner in discharge of his or their Specific or pecuniary Tax, as far as it will be sufficient for that purpose.

-------------------- page 478 --------------------

Halifax, Tuesday, 18th December, 1780, to Thursday, 20th December, 1780.

Received a Letter from Mr. George Davidson. Filed No. 137.

Received a Letter from John Taylor. Filed No. 138.

Received a Letter from Major Mountflorence. Filed No. 139.

———


Friday, 21st December, 1780,
to
Monday, 24th December, 1780.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent B. Hawkins, Esq.:

Sir:

Yesterday I arrived from the Army in Mecklenburg, and find them, as well as the Inhabitants in that quarter, greatly distressed for Salt. Gen. Greene, on hearing the Enemy from Virginia were advancing towards Edenton, gave Orders that all the Continental Salt in this State should immediately be removed to the interior parts of the Country, and requested the Board of War to do the same in regard to the State Salt and public Stores, least they might, near the Sea Board, become an immediate Object for the Enemy. I informed him of the Order of the Board at Hillsborough to the Commissioners of Trade respecting the Removal of the public Salt from Newbern to Johnston Court House, where I expected it was arrived by that Time. Finding a large number of Cattle, drove from different parts of the State, in possession of the County Commissioners of Rowan and Mecklenburg and Colonel Polk, the Superintending Commissary, which required to be immediately slaughtered and salted up, gave directions from the Board that Fifteen Hundred Bushels of Salt be brought from Johnston Court House or Newbern for that purpose; and also engaged one Hundred Waggons to bring the remainder into different Counties of the State near Virginia; but to my great Surprise and Mortification, at Hillsborough I learned that there was no public Salt at Johnston Court House or Newbern. I sent a Message back to halt Waggons. Some it reached, and others will come forward. This Failure of Salt in your Stores at this critical

-------------------- page 479 --------------------
time, where we were taught to believe there was a large stock, I am sensible will greatly alarm the Army. Rations of Salt, when I left them, ran low. The County Commissioner could spare none, the Cattle daily falling away on their Hauds without being slaughtered. In short, Sir, I believe the Army, which will shortly be upwards of Five Thousand, must retreat into Virginia, without a Relief of this essential Article of Life, and the State be given up into the Hands of Lord Cornwallis, who is watching a favourable opportunity to give us a Blow. You suggest in your Answer to Mr. Davis's Letter that you are doubtful the several Departments of the State have not understood their respective duties. We are sorry, Sir, that this should be imputed to the Board of War in our Regulation to the Board of Trade, however ignorant we may be of the many other duties belonging to our important Commission. The above Subject you had early Advice of from the Act of the Legislature for granting Specific supplies, which subjected the public Salt in the possession of the Commissioners of Trade to the Drafts of the Board of War to support the Army, which Salt we expected to have remained a sacred Deposit or Fund in your Hands, without being appropriated to any other purpose whatsoever. You mention Returns you have made of Salt, but we have never had the pleasure of seeing any as yet. We always deemed your Stock considerable. We have to regret that there hath been so sparing a Correspondence from the Commissioners of Trade to the Board of War on this, as well as their other Commercial Proceedings, which so greatly affect the Army, the support of which was the Chief design of our political Existence. Frequently have we applied for Supplies of the Sugar, Rum, &c., for the Hospital, together with some few necessaries for ourselves, at Hillsboro, and have sent Waggons for that purpose, by whom we have not been favoured with any answer, and some of them have returned loaded with private property instead of public; particularly one with a Hogshead of Crockery Ware for Mr. Fullock. Mr. Montford, a young man who attended the Waggon, says, Two Barrels of Sugar were taken from out of them by order of Colonel William Blount, without any reason assigned. Such Transactions, Sir, the reasons of which we are ignorant, we submit to your Feelings for an explanation. We mean not by this to criminate your Conduct, we mention Facts; you will be the Judge. As
-------------------- page 480 --------------------
the power, of the Board of War will soon sleep by returning to the General Assembly from whence they came we are pleased we shall not long be troublesome to our Friends. In the mean while, Sir, be pleased to have Report ready of all your public commercial Transactions since your Appointment of the Commercial Agent, and one of the Board of Trade, to be laid before the next Assembly, where we flatter ourselves you will give every public Satisfaction; and, lastly, beg leave to repeat and press upon you the important Subject, Salt, which must be had at all events.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Colonel Thomas Wade:

Sir:

When I arrived, at this place I expected that, agreeable to the directions given you from Charlotte and by your Engagement, that Mr. Kimbrough and the other persons by you mentioned would have been by this lodged in Halifax Gaol, but to the Surprize of the Board now met they are not here. Mr. Raiford informs us he understands you have admitted Kimbrough to Bail. This we hope is not true, you consulted General Gates on that Subject at Charlotte, who referred you to the Board of War, the Sense of which now notified, you have already had; and we shall be sorry that any thing hath altered your first Instruction and determination in this matter. His Offence is not bailable by any Law; it is a dangerous precedent to bail him, however penitent he may seem, or friendly to us. If he is not brought forward to be present at the next Assembly, it is painful for me to inform you from the Board that a charge will be exhibited against you by them for disobedience of Orders, and you will be subject to an arrest; this we should be sorry for at a Time when we expect your Services would be otherwise very important to your Country.

———


Tuesday, 25th of December, 1780.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent His Excellency, Governor Nash:

Sir:

Your Excellency's Letter to the Board by Major Oneal was received only a few days ago, who detained it 'til my Return from the Army, on my way to meet the Board in full at Halifax,

-------------------- page 481 --------------------
agreeable to your Excellency's Adjournment, not knowing of the discretionary power you was pleased to honor them with of adjourning where they thought proper for the public Service; otherwise I should have remained in Charlotte until the Board would have convened there, where their presence is absolutely necessary. General Greene was at Charlotte with the Army when I left him; and, unless he changes Ground, he cannot subsist long there; between the British and our Armies, that part of the State is exhausted. General Smallwood would have moved the Army downward long before this, but General Gates would never hear of it. I thought it my duty while in that quarter to know the situation of the Country and what prospect of supplies might be drawn from below; accordingly I attended General Smallwood near to Rocky Mount, on the Catawba, and, with a Foraging Party, found many abdicated Plantations, the Corn in the Fields standing untouched; and several advantageous Grounds for Posts, particularly at Land's Ford, where the Enemy crossed, and a Ford Twelve Mile below. From either of these places a Line of Posts might be formed to Peedee. This, on my Return to Camp, I urged from the Board, with General Smallwood to General Greene. He came to no conclusion while I staid with him, requiring some time, as he said, to inform himself of the Country, not choosing to be in surprising distance of Lord Cornwallis until he was strong enough to fight him. I am sensible they must march soon to some of these places, or retreat, or they must soon starve. However, Colonel Polk is doing, I believe, his utmost to supply them as Superintending Commissary. While I was in Camp your Excellency's Orders arrived to General Davidson to draft the Salisbury Militia to supply the places of those whose Time is Expired, which draft he ordered to be made, but by advice from the Board ordered them to halt and be ready to march at the earliest notice, when General Greene's Intentions could be known and a provision made for their future support. The Militia in Camp at present, without some active Operations should go forward, would only add distress to the Continental Troops. And we find your Excellency has, with great propriety, halted those of Halifax and the lower districts. The Hillsborough Troops by this are on their March, with whom we have not concurred, but recommend you would also halt them for the above
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reasons. We are sorry to find in your Excellency's Letter by Oneal, and one to Mr. Davis, that you conceive the first Magistrate of the State injured by the great powers of the Board of War, and therefore cannot fill up the vacancies without a Violation of the Constitution you was sworn to preserve. Your Excellency will be pleased to pardon us, when we inform you we cannot view the powers of the Board in the same dangerous light, otherwise we should consider ourselves equally criminal to our Country should we persist in the Exercise of such unwarrantable powers. The Board of War, Sir, as they now stand, was intended to superintend the Staff and be an extraordinary Council both to the General as well as to the Governor of the State. The Appointment of Staff Officers was heretofore by Warrant from the General commanding our Militia, and they were amenable to him by Court Martial for their Conduct, and also to the General Assembly for the Expenditure of public Monies, and not to the Governor. The General formed his own Posts, under the direction of the Continental Commander, for the public Security, who, with the other States, made Requisitions upon the General Assembly, who authorized the Governor to order out such Aids as they thought necessary. Pray, Sir, how is the Constitution violated if the delinquent Staff Officers are brought to account or turned out of office, as these Posts are formed as Aids prayed for by the Board of War? Their present powers are greatly restricted from those contained in a Bill, on its passage the last Assembly, said to be drawn by your Excellency, that all the orders and Acts of the said Board should be binding on the Inhabitants of this State in all cases whatsoever, Taxation only excepted. The extraordinary powers, we are told, your Excellency was reconciled with, when the present Act, with its Restrictions, is reprobated as criminal and dangerous to the Constitution and affrontive to the Chief Magistrate. Your Excellency was pleased to refer the propriety of pardoning the Tories to the Board of War, which, should we judge expedient, we were to issue a Proclamation for that purpose, or otherwise to desire General Smallwood to do it. We cannot think, from the Goodness of your Excellency's Heart and Uprightness of your Intention, you meant to draw the Board of War into Measures that would have not only subjected them to Ridicule but given ample reason to rouze the Jealousy of their
-------------------- page 483 --------------------
Country against them in assuming one of the Summa Jura Imperii lodged alone with your Excellency, except in a particular case, which cannot be delegated to any person whatsoever. We have not, therefore, issued a Proclamation or recommended it to General Smallwood, but that rests where it ought, with your Excellency. As the powers of the Board have given umbrage to your Excellency and some other respectable Friends, we wish not long to be troublesome to you and them. Perhaps this Bugbear will soon return to the General Assembly who raised it, and we shall all be on good Terms again. We have not been very dangerous to the Government as yet—the Staff, County Commissioners, Commissioners of Trade have only been teazed together with Genl. Gates. We are alarmed at the Scarcity of Salt in the Hands of the Commissioners, an article so necessary for the salvation of our country. Their Proceedings are mysterious to us.

———


Wednesday, 26th December, 1780.

Received a Letter from Colonel Malmedy. Filed No. 140.

Received a Letter from Captain Yarborough. Filed No. 141.

Received a Letter from John Tilly. Filed No. 142.

Received a Letter from B. Hawkins, Esqr. Filed No. 143.

———


Thursday, 27th December, 1780,
to
Sunday, 30th December, 1780.

Received a Letter from Major General Greene. Filed No. 144.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Samuel Caswell, Esq:

Sir:

You mention in your Letter to the Board your being Issuing Commissary to the Troops at Kingston. We wish to have this explained as soon as possible. We know not what Troops are Stationed or to whom provisions are to be issued there, without the Militia passing and repassing are meant thereby, whose issuing Commissaries march with them. You will please to observe that all Commissaries who issue State Provisions at particular Posts must derive their Appointments from the Board of War,

-------------------- page 484 --------------------
which they with pleasure are ready to give you as soon as they are made sensible of the necessity of the Post at Kingston. In the meanwhile you have an Order on Mr. Tillery for Provisions as you require till we hear further from you.

Received a Letter from John Taylor, Iss. Commis. Filed No. 145.

———


Monday, 31st December, 1780,
to
Tuesday, 1st January, 1781.

Received a Letter from Thomas Hunter, Comr. Filed No. 146.

———


Thursday, 4th January, 1781.

Received a Letter from Major General Greene. Filed No. 147.

Received a Letter from Colonel Wade. Filed No. 148.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent the Honorable Major General Greene:

Sir:

The Two Letters with which the Board have been honored by you announced your Arrival, to the great pleasure and Satisfaction of this State, to take Command of the Southern Army. Permit us, Sir, to Congratulate you on this Event, as also on the high Trusts reposed in you, which, from the great attention you have already paid to the Interests of the Army and of this State, we are sensible will be faithfully discharged towards the Support of the one and the Salvation of the other. We are sorry, Sir, that the Legislature of this County have not yet agreed on some Mode of completing their Continental Battalions, but in their room have employed their Militia, a defence too transitory to place much Reliance in, who, with their Horse, unfortunate for us, we find have too much destroyed the Resources of this Country, that heretofore were great as to provision Supplies. The Board, however, intend to press again the great Object of raising Continental Troops this Session, which, if effected, may prevent in future the Evils complained of. As our Treasury is exhausted, and will continue so until the Collection of the Money Tax, policy forbids the Emitting of more on the former Footing. We are obliged to support

-------------------- page 485 --------------------
the Army on a new System, that is, by a Specific provision Tax, which, in a great Measure, would answer the End, if the difficulty of carriage was not so great, as it must chiefly be by Land. The late defeat near Camden deprived us of too many Waggons, which now would be very necessary. Yet, Sir, there are a great many yet in this State, which, registered or classed in Brigades as you mention, under a proper Waggon Master in each County, might be drawn forth to answer all the purposes of an inland Carriage for the Army. As the matter will require some more Regulations than the Board of War can at present form, they will submit it to the Legislature for their Approbation and sanction, which will give greater Weight to the same. Your Sentiments respecting Magazines being in the rear of the Army are perfectly agreeable to the Board, but they know not where the Army will take position, as that depends on Circumstances, to lay up any principal Magazines; but with pleasure we hear that you have taken post on Peedee, which will enable us to form many Magazines from whence you may be supplied. In that Quarter Cattle may be fed on Corn-Brake, or drove to proper Range, which will answer in some Measure the End of Stall Feeding. Mr. Amis, the Superintending Commissary in Wilmington district, hath our Orders for this purpose, who by this time, we presume, is attending you, if Colonel Polk hath left the Commissary's Business. We wish to take the sense of the General Assembly as to a Commissary General, that this duty may be pointed out under proper Restrictions and an adequate Recompence be made him for his Trouble. Sensible of the just Observations you make respecting your Army and our Militia, we wish to have the Militia employed in partizan Corps until you have collected sufficient Strength to offend the Enemy, but at present our new drafts are not ordered forward least they might distress you as to provisions; but a number of volunteers by this time, we flatter ourselves, have attended you from the district of Salisbury, under the Command of General Davidson, to maneouvre on the Enemy, as you will please to direct, in the Western Country, whose support will not affect your Army. The Board, composed of Three Members only, are anxious to be with the Army as soon as possible but two of them, being in the Senate, cannot attend the duties of the Board with you until the Rising of the General Assembly, which we
-------------------- page 486 --------------------
expect to meet every day, after which, should their power still continue, they with pleasure will wait on the Army and attend to their calls; and they hereby engage, so far as they are invested with Authority, to draw forth all the powers of the State and every necessary Resource in it to support you, that the Command with which you are dignified may be honourable to yourself as well as salutary to this Country.

———


Friday, 5th January, 1781.

Received a Letter from Robert Bignall, Esq. Filed No. 149.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Major General Greene:

Sir:

Yours of the 14th & 19th Ultimo were handed the Board by Colonel Davie, the first of which, respecting him, with pleasure we have paid Attention to, but have not undertaken to give him those extensive powers which you with propriety urged to me when at Charlotte, and still recommend to be given to a Commissary General, thinking the Board not fully impowered to create an Office, with all the necessary Authority appendant thereto, without the sense of the Legislature. Your Letter on that subject, together with that on the County Commissioners taking up the receipts of the Continental Quarter Masters and Commissaries, we shall lay before the General Assembly, whom we expect to meet every day, when the sanction of Law, obtained on these important Objects, will answer a more valuable purpose than an Ordinance from the Board of War, but should the Assembly not take up these Matters, we shall always be ready, should our powers still exist, to issue any Ordinances or concert with you any Regulations for the Support of the Army and the security of this State, as far as we have Resources and Strength for that purpose. In the mean while Colonel Davie hath an Appointment for that purpose to superintend Salisbury District, with powers to call on any Superintendent for Supplies while the Army is in that district or in its Vicinity. This will do for the present, 'til an Act be passed to create the above Office and point out the particular duties and powers thereof. At present, the County Commissioners

-------------------- page 487 --------------------
cannot be appointed but by five Justices of the County, according to the late Act. Mr. Amis, Superintendent Commissary of Wilmington district, must by this Time be with you, who, we make no doubt, will be very attentive to the wants of the Army and pay Obedience to our Commands. This day a Letter arrived to Brigr. General Jones from Virginia, notifying him of the Return of the Enemy to James River, or perhaps the Arrival of General Prevost with his Troops, being in sixty Ships. Their numbers are uncertain. This Evening Doctor Rose arrived from Richmond, who says Twenty of their Ships have run up James River as far as Hoods at Shirley Hundred within Twenty Miles of Petersburg, landed some men and attacked a little Fort there, which, after some Shot, was abandoned by our people with some precipitation and was by the Enemy destroyed. The Militia of the neighboring Counties on their march to oppose them, with what regulars were at Petersburg.

———


Saturday, 6th January, 1781.

Received a Letter from Edward Carrington. Filed No. 150.

Received a Letter from Major Murfree. Filed No. 151.

———


Sunday, 7th January, 1781.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Brigadier General Lillington:

Sir:

As the Enemy have returned to Virginia, or a part of General Prevost's Troops who have been expected from Britain some Time, they may entertain some previous Intentions of reducing this State, and in that attempt may land Troops at some of our principal Posts to cut off our Communication with the sea. Among those Cape Fear will be one of their principal Objects. The Board, attentive to the Wants and Necessities of the Army, on whom the salvation of this Country chiefly depends; at the same time cautious of distressing the good people of this State but on the most urgent Occasion, do recommend to you that on the first Appearance of the Enemy's Landing anywhere in Cape Fear or its Vicinity, you will immediately seize all stores of Salt, Rum, Sugar

-------------------- page 488 --------------------
and other Articles essentially necessary for the Army, in whatsoever Hands they may be, and have the same forwarded to Cross Creek to Col. Rowan, with the utmost dispatch, in Boats. Some Cross Creek Boats may be detained some time for this purpose, tho' under a different Appearance, least those having these Articles may hide them if your Intentions are once known. Stock or cattle, on such Exigence from the Sea side you will please to order to be drove up the Country, so as not to distress private Families. Your own Prudence will suggest to you other precautions necessary, should the Enemy approach you; should you leave that part of the State to take Command of our Militia, you will please to leave Instructions of this kind to some confidential Officer, who with Secrecy and punctuality will carry them into execution.

———


Monday, 8th January, 1781.

Received a Letter from Genl. Jones. Filed No. 152.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent the Governor of Virginia:

Sir:

Having heard of a Body of British Troops landing in Virginia, the Board of War of this State beg to be informed from your Excellency of their numbers, Movements and Intentions, that if necessary our Militia be employed and act in Concert with your Force to repel them. We make no doubt but that their principal Object at present is the Reduction of North Carolina, and their Landing in Virginia may be either to plunder or an effort to stop Succours from joining the Southern Army. However, should they be favored in attempting to form Posts in Virginia, they will also endeavor to extend a Line of them thro' this State, should their Numbers give them any Pretensions to effect this. We are desirous to take every early Precaution in our Power to frustrate their Attempts, and therefore wish that your Excellency would be pleased to have every important Intelligence on this Subject communicated to our Governor, or to us, which not only concerns the mutual Interests, but very being, of both States. We in turn will gladly give your Excellency Information of every event of Concern coming to our Knowledge.

-------------------- page 489 --------------------

Tuesday, 9th January, 1781.

Received a Letter from Edw. Hall, Com'r. Filed No. 153.

An Order issued on the County Commissioner of Halifax for One Thousand Weight Pork for the Use of Francis Roberts, and Seven Hundred Weight Pork for the Use of James Faucett, both in the Quarter Master's Employ.

John Henry Hall commissioned Issuing Commissary at Tarborough.

An Order issued on the Commissioners of Trade for Twenty-Five Bushels of Salt, in favour of E. Hall, Commissioner of Edgecome County.

———


Wednesday, 10th January, 1781.

An Order given Matthew Raburn, Commissioner of Halifax County, for Twenty-five Bushels Salt.

———


Thursday, 11th January, 1781.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent the Commissioners of Trade:

Gentlemen:

This day was handed the Board a Letter from the County Commissioner of Edgecomb, informing that, notwithstanding his frequent Applications to Mr. Bignall, he had not as yet been furnished with one Bushel of Salt, which has occasioned a loss to the State of upwards of one Hundred Barrels of Pork, an Article so essentially necessary that the Existence of our Army, and consequently the Fate of the State, almost solely depend on a sufficient Supply of it. He is of Opinion that, could he be immediately supplied with Salt, some Pork might yet be made up. We therefore hope you will lose no Time in furnishing him with at least Twenty-five Bushels, for which quantity he has an Order and will apply.

———


Friday, 12th January, 1781.

Received a Letter from Colo. Carrington. Filed No. 154.

-------------------- page 490 --------------------

Saturday, 13th January, 1781,
to
Monday, 15th January, 1781.

An Order given Francis Roberts and William Stevens in the Quarter Master's department for one pair Stockens each.

Received a Letter from John Taylor. Filed No. 155.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Dr. William Pasteur:

Sir:

It is the Opinion of the Board of War that the present Situation of Affairs renders unsafe the keeping public Stores at Newbern. You will therefore Cause that all stores at that place belonging to this or the United States be immediately removed from thence to Kingston, whether the same be in your or any other possession.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent John Taylor:

Sir:

Yours of the 10 and 12th Instant by Mr. Mason was this Evening presented the Board. Enclosed you will receive an Order on Robert Rowan, Esq., for Twenty-five Bushels of Salt; we shall order on from the Commissioner of Halifax Eighty Hogs, which you may expect shortly to receive. The Horse left with you by General Smallwood we think too valuable to be made a Waggon Horse or common Drudge of; you will therefore have proper Care taken of him, until ordered out of your possession by the Board

———


Tuesday, 16th January, 1781.

Received a Letter from Robert Bignall, Esq. Filed No. 156.

Colonel William Richardson Davie, of Mecklenburg County, appointed Superintendent Commissary Genl. of provision Supplies for the State of No. Carolina.

Ordered that the following Instructions be made out for Colonel Davie:

Instructions for Colonel Davie, Superintendent Commissary General of the State of North Carolina for provision Supplies:

-------------------- page 491 --------------------
Colonel Davie is to superintend all the County Commissioners of provision Supplies in the State of North Carolina, and from them supply the different Posts of the Army in the said State or Vicinity thereof. He is to make Requisition from them of all provision Supplies for the Army, and they are to pay due Obedience to the same, under the penalty of their being suspended by him from Office, and others appointed in their room, as the Act of Assembly in such case directs. He may employ Assistants, not exceeding Four, to carry his Orders into the different Counties and see them carried into execution, and may also employ a Clerk to keep accounts of all Provisions received and delivered to the use of the Army afsd., conforming himself to the Rules and Regulations of the Commissary General of Purchases in the Continental Army in this particular. The Superintendent Commissaries of districts heretofore appointed by the Board are required to aid and assist him from their respective districts with such Supplies as he may call for, who are to pay all due Obedience to such Requisition as aforesaid, until this department be fully regulated by Act of Assembly; that he appoint one or more Waggon Masters to procure a sufficient number of Waggons, equal to the Service in the said department, and to attend the same into the different Counties or districts of the State, and convey to the several Posts of the Army Provisions received as aforesaid; that the Colonel be allowed Rations for himself and Servant and his four Assistants, and Forage for Six Horses; and that he and the persons employedunder him as aforesaid render on Oath an Account of all necessary Expeditions by them made during such Service; that when he is not in the Neighbourhood of the Army he call upon the Commanding Officers of the respective Counties for such Parties of Men necessary to aid him in such Service which shall be considered as part of a Tour of duty.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent the Superintending Commissaries of districts:

Whereas, Colonel Davie hath been appointed by the Board Superintendent Commissary General of provisions Supplies for the State of North Carolina, with powers and authorities to demand and receive Supplies from the several Superintendent Commissaries or County Commissioners in this State; you will therefore pay due attention to all Requisitions of Supplies made you by

-------------------- page 492 --------------------
Colonel Davie for the Support of the Army, as far as in your power; otherwise you will be liable to be removed from Office.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Gov. Nash:

Sir:

As the Board of War have imployed Colonel Davie as a Superintendent Commissary of Provision Supplies for the District of Salisbury, the Board request your Excellency to grant to them Warrants on the Treasurers to the Amount of one Hundred Thousand pounds, in ten Thousand pounds each, to enable them to support Coln. Davie in this Business, so necessary for the Existence of the Army.

———


Wednesday, 17th January, 1781.

An Order issued in favour of Messrs. Branson and Rose, in the Employ of the Qr. Master, for 4 quarters Beef and 4 Barrels Corn for the former, and 1,000 lb. Pork or Beef and ten Barrels Corn for the latter.

An Order in favour of the public Collier for 4 Bus. Corn and 500 lb. Beef or Pork.

Received of His Excellency, Gov. Nash, Warrants on the Treasury to the amount of one Hundred Thousand pounds, which, by Order of the Board, were paid into the Hands of Colonel Davie.

Received a Letter from Colonel Long. Filed No. 157.

———


Thursday, 18th January, 1781.

William Wooley and James Raiford, confined in Gaol on a suspicion of Treason, ordered to be discharged, Captain Thomas Chiles being Security for their personal appearance at Salisbury Superior Court next.

———


Friday, 19th January, 1781.

An Order issued on the Quarter Master for Four Reams Paper, for the use of the General Assembly.

-------------------- page 493 --------------------

Saturday, 20th January, 1781.

Received a Letter from James Coor, Esquire Commissioner of Craven County. Filed No. 157.

———


Sunday, 21st January, 1781.

Received a Letter from John Baker Comr. Filed No. 158.

An Order given John Baker for Twenty Ftve Bushels Salt.

———


Monday, 22d January, 1781.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Mr. John Baker.

Sir:

Yours pr. Express we have received, and send you enclosed an Order for 25 Bushels of Salt on the Commissioners of Trade or, any one of their Agents. We have hardly any public Salt anywhere except Newbern; you will be under a necessity to send a Waggon for it there, if you cannot barter Corn for a sufficient Supply in your own Country, which we hereby give you permission to do at the common rates. The Pork you mention in the possession of Mr. Swope we must request you to seize on and retain under your Care until the Board can be made acquainted by Mr. Wells who the Pork belongs to and for what purpose purchased. The Board are sorry to observe to you that Accounts from the upper parts of your County induce them to suppose you have hardly been active enough in your Office.

———


Tuesday, 23rd January, 1781.

Received a Letter from Gen. Greene. Filed No. 159.

———


Wednesday, 24th January, 1781.

An Order issued in favour of James Coor for Fifty Bushels Salt.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent James Coor, Esq.:

Sir;

Yours of the 18th Inst. came to Hand a few days ago. Enclosed you will receive an Order on the Commissioners of Trade for

-------------------- page 494 --------------------
Fifty Bushels Salt. It is the opinion of the Board that you continue, from time to time, to deliver to the Quarter Master, or other person having a similar Right to call for the same, any provision Supplies you may collect, taking their receipts for the same, and that you deliver Mr. Hawkins any quantities of Corn he may call for, and you can spare, to enable him to proure Salt; and that you order all salted Beef and Pork in your Possession to be carried up Neuse to Johnston Court House by Water, if this is practicable.

———


Thursday, 25th January, 1781.

Received a Letter from the Board of Trade. Filed No. 160.

———


Friday, 26th January, 1781.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Major General Greene:

Sir:

Yours of the 17th Inst. the Board were honoured with by Express, and are sorry that the Army are not supplied with Salt equal to their Necessities. Colonel Long, agreeable to our directions, will send off some Waggons to Newbern as soon as possible to relieve you with that Article, as also with some Rum and other Necessaries. We are surprised Mr. Amis hath not yet attended you, as he hath received our orders for that purpose. However, Colonel Davie will soon be with you, possessed of the Powers you have recommended, and is only waiting to negotiate into Money some Warrants we have obtained from the Governor on the Treasurers to enable him to carry into Effect his Appointment. As the Drafts of the Militia were Ordered by His Excellency in the Recess, and before the Meeting of the Board at this place, we expected he had given you previous Notice of the Aid intended you, and from what part of the State. This Day the General Assembly Meet, convened with great difficulty, when we shall do ourselves the Honour of laying your Letters before them, which contain Matters of the highest moment, and which call for their immediate Interposition.

-------------------- page 495 --------------------

Saturday, 27th January, 1781.

Ordered that the Following be made out and sent Benjamin Hawkins, Esquire:

Sir:

The Board are induced, from the unexpected scarcity of Salt in this State, to desire that you do not answer the large Draughts, above Twenty-five Bushels, by them made for that Article in December last for Colonel Polk and the Commissioners of the Western Counties when the Army were stationed there. As we wish you to retain as large a quantity thereof as will supply their immediate Exigencies, and the County Commissioners who are not yet supplied, you perhaps will think with us, that Newbern is too unsafe a Repository for an article of such Importance; therefore recommend that the public Salt there be removed to Johnston Court House, or some interior parts of the State, by Water if this is practicable, least by being on the Sea Ports it should become an Object for the Enemy.

———


Sunday, 28th January, 1781,
to
Monday, 29th January, 1781.

An Order given___Boone, Commissioner of Wayne County, for Twenty-five Bushels Salt.

———


Tuesday, 30th January, 1781.

Received a Letter from James Kerr, Commissioner of Rowan County. Filed No. 161.

END OF BOARD OF WAR JOURNAL.