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Letter from Edward Carrington to Horatio Gates
Carrington, Edward, 1749-1810
October 29, 1780
Volume 14, Pages 717-718

LT. COL. CARRINGTON TO MAJ. GENL. GATES.

Petersburgh, Octo. 29th, 1780.

Dr. Genl.:

The Horses I mentioned in my last for the Artillery have just this moment left this place, & are to be pushed on as quickly as possible till they come up with you. I have not been able to get the Director of our Laboratory so well accommodated for business as I could wish, but have got him to work so well that the Articles we are likely to stand earliest in need of will be done. I expect in a few days he will send forward fixed Shott for the four pounder sent on to the Yadkin. I shall also shortly have a few Waggons supplied by Virga. for the intermediate Service from Taylor's Ferry to your Camp.

The Enemy had last Week landed at Hampton a Body of Men, said to be about 500, but re-embarked again on Tuesday without

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doing any mischief further than getting a Considerable quantity of provisions & taking off some of the inhabitants. They had also landed a Body of Men in the Neighbourhood of Norfolk, from whence the Governor had been able to get no certain intelligence when I left Richmond last Thursday; but there has just now Arrived at this place an Express from Genl. Muhlenburg, who lies at Cabbin point, about 25 miles from this. From him we learn that the Enemy are moving on towards Smithfield, but the intelligence is so imperfect that I can say nothing to you as to their numbers. Genl. Muhlenburg Marched from here with about 1,000 men. Genl. Nelson is still nearer the Enemy, with such Militia as he has been able to Collect in the country thereabouts. Colo. Lawson is now forming a Volunteer Corps that will be respectable. Should the Enemy intend to push their operations in this State, I am convinced they will meet with a Vigorous opposition, as the people are much disposed to turn out. The State is unhappily much unprepared as to Arms, &c., but still I hope they will do well.

I am now this far on my way back to Taylor's Ferry, where I shall be ready to be Honored with your Commands in two or three days at furthest.

I have the honor to be,
With much respect & Esteem,
Yr. Mo. Obt.
ED. CARRINGTON.