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Letter from William Smallwood to Horatio Gates
Smallwood, William, 1732-1792
November 27, 1780
Volume 14, Pages 760-761

GENL. W. SMALLWOOD TO MAJ. GENL. HORATIO GATES.

Camp, November 27th, 1780.

Sir:

Inclosed is the intercepted letter of Tarleton's to Majr. McArthur, omited being sent before, which I have just recd., no further Intelligence from Sumter. It was delivered in the State. You will receive it by a person on Furlough to the Waxhaws. I have also inclosed you News paper.

I have just recd. Intelligence from the lower part of the Waxhaws, by Colo. Davie's Father, that Cornwallis is on the move. His Baggage, in great Confusion & Hurry, on Friday was on the Road leading to Charles town, but it was uncertain whether destined for that place or Camden, as it had not arrived at the Forks of the Road leading to Camden, out of Charles Town Road, when the informant left it, but I expect this Evening or tomorrow Morning a more certain Account of his Lordship's Army and Motions from the persons imployed, who I gave you a hint of, and it shall be immediately transmitted. What shall I do with Morgan? He is in a fever to go below, which this and other Intelligence has increased. I have told him your orders were positive to March the troops and Baggage to Charlotte, and I cannot conceive his proposed tour will be of any service, unless he has waggons to bring off the provision & forage that might be acquired by a speedy excursion, for I do not apprehend circumstances would Admit of his Stay so long as to Aid or enable the Inhabitants to move off their effects; but he has wrote you and took a Letter which I this day received from Mr. Wade.

Mr. Mucklerath, a refugee, who has just escaped out of Charles town, a person of Veracity and a true Whig, has arrived

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in Camp and informs the Garrison at Charles Town does not exceed two Hundred & fifty Regulars and a like Number of Militia. The Cork fleet, consisting of one Hundred Sail and Twenty Prises, arrived about five weeks ago, out of which Twelve Sail remained. The residue sailed for Savannah and New York. No reinforcements had arrived or were expected, as he heard.

I am, with great regard,
Your Obd. Hble. Servt.,
W. SMALLWOOD.
Genl. Gates.