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Orders from William Campbell
Campbell, William, 1745-1781
October 13, 1780 - October 14, 1780
Volume 15, Pages 118-119

COL. CAMPBELLS ORDERS OF THE DAY.

Parole—New Bern.


Camp at Col. Walker's, October 13, 1780.

The Deputy Quartermasters, under the direction of the Quarter Master General, to dispose of the wounded of their respective regiments, who are not able to march with the army, in the best manner they can, in the vicinity of this place.

The Quarter Masters to call upon the companies to which the wounded belong for any necessary assistance for their removal. The Adjutants to wait upon the Brigade Major at six O'clock every day for the orders. The army to march without fail by two O'clock.

———

Camp at, __________, October 14, 1780.

The many desertions from the army, and consequent felonies committed by those who desert, oblige me once more to insist that proper regimental returns be made every morning, noting down the names of those who desert, that such may hereafter be punished with the justice which their crimes deserve; and officers commanding regiments are requested not to discharge any of their troops until we can dispose of the prisoners to a proper guard. The

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Quarter Master General to see the ammunition taken from the enemy properly issued to the troops, who have not yet drawn any of it. The Commissary General is to send small parties before us upon our route to collect provisions; and he is hereby empowered to call upon the commanding officers of the different regiments for such parties. It is with anxiety I hear the complaints of the inhabitants on account of the plundering parties who issue out from the camp, and indiscriminately rob both Whig and Tory, leaving our friends, I believe, in a worse situation than the enemy would have done. I hope the officers will exert themselves in suppressing this abominable practise, degrading to the name of soldier, by keeping their soldiers close in camp and preventing their straggling off upon our marches.