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Letter from the North Carolina General Assembly to Alexander Martin
North Carolina. General Assembly
April 25, 1782
Volume 16, Pages 302-303

TO GOVERNOR ALEXANDER MARTIN, NOTIFICATION OF ELECTION.
[From Executive Letter Book.]

Hillsborough, 25th April, 1782.

Sir:

On Monday last the General Assembly proceeded to the choice of the Chief Magistrate to preside in the Executive Department of the Government of this State, when you, Sir, was elected to that high and important office by joint ballot by both Houses.

The many great and fortunate events achieved in the course of the last year by the Military skill of General Washington, Count De Rochambeau and General Greene, the gallant conduct of the officers and bravery of the Troops of the United States and of our illustrious ally, have entirely changed the face of our affairs. The

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clouds which overcast the political horizon of America are dispersed and Joy and smiling hopes of future success have succeeded in their place, yet much remains to be done to effect the completion of our wishes and establish the Independency of the United States on a solid basis.

In a happier hour you are elected by the voice of your Country successor to our late worthy and able Governor, and it gives us peculiar pleasure to have at the Head of the Executive Department a Gentleman on whose ability, firmness and integrity we can rely with the utmost confidence.

We assure you, Sir, that nothing shall be left undone on the part of the Legislature which may tend towards the General Defence and to make your Administration easy, happy and honorable.

To you, therefore Sir, as the first Executive Magistrate of this State we commit and deliver the Bill of Rights and the Constitution; the one ascertaining the civil and political rights of the freemen of this Country, the other giving existence to your office and the present happy form of Government. That the same under your guardian care may be preserved, inviolate, supported, maintained and defended, we present you with this Sword as an emblem of that power and authority with which you are invested for the defence of the State and rights and liberties of the people.

RICHARD CASWELL,
Speaker of the Senate.
THOMAS BENBURY,
Speaker of the House of Commons.