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Resolution by the Continental Congress concerning trade with the British
United States. Continental Congress
June 21, 1782
Volume 16, Pages 343-344

A RESOLUTION OF CONGRESS TRANSMITTED TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY.
[From Executive Letter Book.]

By the United States
In Congress Assembled,
June 21st, 1782.

On the report of a Committee to whom was recommitted their

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report on motion of Mr. Madison, Congress passed the following Act:

Whereas, the enemy having renounced the hope of accomplishing their designs against the United States by force alone, are resorting to every expedient which may tend to corrupt the patriotism of their Citizens, or to weaken the foundation of the public credit, and in pursuance of this policy are encouraging to the utmost a Clandestine traffic between the Inhabitants of this Country and those who reside within the Garrisons and places therein now in their possession.

And, whereas, some of the said Inhabitants prompted either by a sordid attachment to gain, or by a secret conspiracy with the enemies of their Country, are wickedly engaged in carrying on this illicit traffic, whereby a market is provided for British merchandizes, the circulating Specie is exported from the United States, the payment of Taxes rendered more difficult and burthensome to the people at large and great discouragement occasioned to honest and Lawful Commerce.

Resolved,

That it be and hereby is recommended to the Legislatures of the several States to adopt the most efficacious measures for suppressing all traffic and illicit intercourse between their respective Citizens and the Enemy.

Resolved,

That the Legislatures, or in case of their recess, the Executives of the several States be earnestly requested to impress by every means in their power on their respective Citizens at large, the baneful consequences apprehended by Congress from a continuation of this illicit and infamous traffic, and the necessity of their co-operating with the Public measures by such united patriotic and vigilant exertions as will detect and bring to legal punishment those who shall have been in any manner concerned therein.1

CHARLES THOMPSON,
Secretary.

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1 Proclamation issued in Consequence of the above, vide Proclamation.