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Colonial and State Records of North Carolina
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Letter from Robert Morris to Alexander Martin
Morris, Robert, 1734-1806
September 05, 1782
Volume 16, Pages 407-408

HON. ROBERT MORRIS TO GOV. MARTIN.
[From Executive Letter Book]

Office of Finance,
5th September, 1782.

Sir:

I have been duly honored with your Excellency’s favor of the third of July last. I should have answered it sooner but no proper conveyance offered speedily and the delay at first placed it among papers which I had not time afterwards to take up. I am very happy to find your Excellency so thoroughly impressed with the honest solicitude of doing what is right with the Continental Paper and with relation to the Public Debts. I have much reliance on the Public Spirit of your State and hope that in Proportion as the Rays of Prosperity beam forth it may shine more brightly. As to the several Certificates for things taken to the use of the United States your Excellency will have observed that Congress have made provision for adjusting them in the general plan for settlement of accounts. I have to add that the Revenues for funding those debts when ascertained are now under consideration. Should the plan proposed be recommended and adopted, I have little doubt but that

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all these would, at a small expence to the Public, be converted into very valuable property.

It is now a considerable time since Mr. Parker, of South Carolina, carried forward a number of notes issued for the purpose of Collecting more easily the Taxes of your State. These were accompanied with a Letter to Mr. Burke, as Governor, requesting him to appoint a receiver of Taxes for the State in my name. I have heard nothing on the Subject since, and I shall be extremely glad of any information your Excellency may be able to obtain and think proper to transmit. If no steps have been taken to carry the plan proposed into Execution hitherto, I should presume that under present circumstances it will be unnecessary.

With perfect respect, &c.,
ROBERT MORRIS.