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Letter from Archibald Maclaine to George Hooper
Maclaine, Archibald, 1728-1790
February 14, 1784
Volume 17, Page 131

-------------------- page 131 --------------------
HON. A. MACLAINE TO GEORGE HOOPER.

Wilmington, 14th Febry., 1784.

Dear Sir:

I have lately wrote you two letters; one by Mr. Campbell (who will be the bearer of this) the other by some dutch gentlemen by whom I wrote an introductory letter. I was somewhat mistaken about these gentlemen; the Baron, who is a young man, & Mr. Barker were the two who came over with Mr. Van Berkel. Barker has an English countenance, & speaks our language tolerably well. Godin is the eldest & shortest of the three, inclining to be fat; & is the person who intends to settle in America. I thought thus much necessary, that you might not be at the same loss, in applying the proper names, which we have been here.

Young has declined the contest, & I am told Read has done the same. If this is really so, I am persuaded that it arises from a conviction that the opposition will not be attended with success; nay that it must end in disgrace. The whole town is alarmed at the folly & effrontry of these people. The former however was, I am persuaded set to work by Walker.

Another candidate has been mentioned to-day; and as he has been mentioned by Read, I am inclined to think that it is not without foundation. I have besides some private reasons to think there is something in it. But who do you think this candidate is? You cannot guess; & therefore I will tell you. No less than parson Boyd. He dined with me to-day and is now sitting by the fire reading a news paper. He did not, when asked, expressly deny the charge, & had told me before I asked him that he intended to go out of town to-morrow, & not return for a month. Is it improbable that the scheme is to keep me out, & that my opponent is to be out of the way, so as to free himself from all blame in contesting a seat with his friend? Would you think he wants to be a delegate?

Let Mr. Burgwin know that I wait to hear from him before I will venture to send him any servants.

Yours,
A. MACLAINE.