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Letter from Archibald Maclaine to George Hooper
Maclaine, Archibald, 1728-1790
February 09, 1786
Volume 18, Pages 534-545

A. MACLAINE TO GEORGE HOOPER.
[From Executive Letter Book.]

Wilmington, 9th Febry., 1786.

My Dear Sir:

Captain Swaine arrived here yesterday afternoon, after a passage of 12 or 14 hours. By him I received your letter, (but no newspapers) and what you sent to Kitty.

The bad weather, Job's indisposition, and the failure of the chair, are additional evils to those which you might expect. Your riding on horse-back, and I suppose upon Job's saddle must have completed your travelling misfortunes. I long for Withers on more accounts than one. My wine is almost out, & he expected to sail so soon that I fear you will not be able to procure that article in time to send by him.

Last night I had a letter from Hay, a pretty long one, written with very bad ink and the writing part not the very best. It was accompanied by money, consisting of paper, silver and gold, with a request that I would influence his intended cousin (Mrs. H.) to lay it out in something proper to present to his intended bride. This important matter was determined, and the time fixed upon, after Hay's letter was begun, and before it was concluded. The first part is therefore querulous, owing to the undecisive conduct of the colonel. The inextricable knot is to be tied about the 18th or 20th and I am pressed by Mr. Hay in the most flattering and friendly manner to be present; but considering how much business is now before me, and how many different things require a personal attendance, it is impossible for me to leave home without ruin.

Mr. Hay informs me that he expects Mr. Rowan will be able to lay out the whole £36,000 in tobacco at 50/. None, it is said, has been offered at Halifax or Tarborough; at the former the merchants offer 25/ and it is said to be 50/ at New Bern.

Colonel Davie of Halifax congratulates me on the rising of the most i—f—s assembly that ever disgraced a country.

-------------------- page 535 --------------------

Archy is in high spirits about your letter, which he will not suffer to be profaned by vulgar eyes. He behaves as well as can be expected, considering who is his schoolmate. I have taken the necessary steps to collect the trustees of the academy the beginning of April, & in the mean time, shall have the requisite security given.

We are to have a grand entertainment for General Howe on Saturday. I take it for granted that the parade necessarily attendant on this important business, will be as grateful to the General, as the smoke of incense in the days of yore, to the gods of Greece & Rome.

Yours with affectionate esteem,
A. MACLAINE.