powered by google
Documenting the American South Logo
Colonial and State Records of North Carolina
Advanced Search Options
Letter from Timothy Bloodworth to Richard Caswell
Bloodworth, Timothy, 1736-1814
May 03, 1786
Volume 18, Page 601

-------------------- page 601 --------------------
TIMOTHY BLOODWORTH ESQ., TO GOV. CASWELL.
[From Executive Letter Book.]

New York, May 3rd, 1786.

Dear Sir:

After a passage of eight days from Wilmington, I arrived here yesterday half after twelve and finding Mr. White here we both presented our Credentials and took our seats this day. Received your instructions with the resolve of the Council and am sorry to inform you that the treaty was received and entered on the Journals before we came here. Under these circumstances I judge it will be prudent to let the matter rest until Mr. Blount takes his seat whose assistance will be of infinite advantage in the undertaking, and the delay will not be attended with any ill convenience. It is not in my power to give you any satisfactory account of the business before Congress as time has not furnished an opportunity for my own Information. I shall embrace the first opportunity to furnish you with proper Intelligence and shall Esteem it an honor to be favored with your advice on every Subject of importance.

I received your warrant but Mr. Reed could not pay one Shilling. Was under the necessity of bringing some tar which I find will net 3/ per Barrel if I am fortunate in the sale; pitch cost me 16/ per Barrel and the freight 5/ per barrel and it goes current here for 11/, all goods.

The Assembly of New York now sitting, has passed an Act for emitting paper currency; also, an Act to comply with the requisitions of Congress respecting the impost but, will not suffer Congress to remove the officer of Impost for mal administration, their remedy in that case is to complain to the Executive who may remove him if they please. This measure gives umbrage to the delegates, but it has not come officially before Congress yet, but expect a Copy will be laid before them to-morrow for their perusal.

I remain dear Sir, with the utmost esteem,
Your Excellency's most Obdt. & very humble Servt,
TIMOTHY BLOODWORTH.