powered by google
Documenting the American South Logo
Colonial and State Records of North Carolina
Advanced Search Options
Circular letter from Thomas Mifflin to the state governors
Mifflin, Thomas, 1744-1800
April 01, 1784
Volume 19, Pages 945-946

GEN. THOMAS MIFFLIN TO GOVERNOR MARTIN.

[Circular.]

Sir:

The object of this address claims the attention of your Excellency on the principle of the most urgent necessity.

The State of our Finances is such as to require the United efforts of Congress and the several States for obtaining immediately a supply of money to prevent the loss of public credit.

When the Army were furloughed they had the promise of three months pay, & as there was not money in the Treasury the Superintendent of Finance was under the necessity of issuing his notes to discharge this & other demands. The notes becoming due part of them were redeemed with money supplied by the several States; but this being inadequatee the Financier drew Bills on Holland for the deficiency. A considerable proportion of these drafts have been paid by loans obtained there on the credit of the United States; But the Letters from our Bankers to the Superintendent of Finance inform that they have been under the necessity for the want of funds to suffer so many of his bills to be protested for non-acceptance, as with the damages on protest in case of non-payment, will amount to the sum of 636,000 Dollars.

-------------------- page 946 --------------------

We expect the return of these Bills under a protest for non-payment, and should there not be money in the Treasury of the United States to discharge them Your Excellency may easily conceive the consequences.

Under such Circumstances Congress think it their duty to communicate the matter confidentially to the Supreme Executive of each State and to request in the most pressing terms their influence and exertion to furnish with all possible dispatch on requisitions unsatisfied, their respective quotas of the sum mentioned according to the appointment herewith transmitted.

I shall only add Sir, that Congress rely on your wisdom for accomplishing their views with as much dispatch as possible, and that the estimates and requisitions for the year will be soon transmitted to your Excellency.

I am with the greatest respect,
THOMAS MIFFLIN.

The apportionment of the 636,000 Dollars is as follows:

New Hampshire
22,348
Massachusetts
95,157
Rhode Island
13,703
Connecticut
56,007
New York
54,375
New Jersey
35,344
Pennsylvania
87,000
Delaware
9,516
Maryland
60,003
Virginia
107,750
North Carolina
46,218
South Carolina
40,782
Georgia
6,797