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Colonial and State Records of North Carolina
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Talk by Alexander Martin to the Cherokee Nation
Martin, Alexander, 1740-1807
Volume 19, Pages 947-948

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TO THE OLD TASSEL OF CHOATE, AND ALL THE WARRIORS OF THE FRIENDLY TOWNS OF THE CHEROKEE NATIONS.
[From Executive Letter Book.]

Brothers:

The time is about arriving when I expected to have held a great talk with you as I promised by Colonel Martin, and hope you will not charge me with being false and faithless to my promise, when I explain to you the reason why this business is obliged to be put off to some longer time. I am sorry to give you this information as the fault is not yours or mine, but from a circumstance I could not have foreseen would have happened while we were preparing to see each other to exchange mutual pledges of lasting friendship.

A String.

Our Brothers, the White People between the Mountains and you, wish to have a Council of beloved men and Government separate from your elder Brother of North Carolina, with whom they heretofore sat and held all their Councils in common.

Your elder Brothers are not yet agreed to their separation from them, till they are a more numerous and stronger people, till we have had talks together on the Terms of the separation, and till the Great Council at New York are agreed. While these things are settling among ourselves, the talking with you must be delayed, as the meeting must be on the ground where they live, and where we must procure things necessary for the support of you and us. And as by this Talk we intend to make a chain of friendship strong and bright that will last forever between you and all your elder Brothers, more especially those who live near you, we wish to have their full consent and hearty assistance as one people in this business.

A String.

Brothers:

Be not discouraged at this delay—whatever disputes may be between your elder Brothers, I trust it will not concern you more

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than you may think the time long we may take up in understanding ourselves.

In the mean time I, as your elder Brother, request you to be peaceably disposed to all the White People, who are our Brothers, and not suffer any mischief to be done to them, either to their persons or property, nor listen to any ill talks that may be offered you either from the red or white bad people; but should any injury be done you by the White people near you complain to their head & beloved men, who I hope will give you redress, till the way is clear for you and us of North Carolina to see each other.

A String.

Brothers:

The time is shortly to be, by the nature of our Government, when I am to become as a private Brother, but the good talks that have passed between us will not be forgotten. I will deliver them carefully to my successor, Governor Caswell, who loves you and wishes to talk with you in the same manner I have. He will have the conducting of the future Talks with you, which I hope will always be to our mutual satisfaction.