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Talk by Alexander Martin to the Cherokee Nation
Martin, Alexander, 1740-1807
Volume 19, Pages 949-951

TO THE OLD TASSEL AND OTHERS, THE WARRIORS OF THE CHEROKEE NATION.
[From Executive Letter Book.]

Brothers:

I have received your talk by Col. Martin on behalf of yourself and all the Cherokee Nation; I am sorry that you have been uneasy and that I could not see you this last Spring as I promised you, as our beloved Men met at Hillsborough had prevented me, by agreeing and concluding among themselves that the great Council of the thirteen States at Philadelphia should transact all affairs belonging to the Red People, particularly respecting trade, peace & friendship, by which my power was suspended until the last meeting of our said beloved Men at New Bern, when they thought it was too much trouble for persons to come from Philadelphia to do the business, we

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could ourselves with much more ease; and accordingly I am authorized to talk to you on every subject that may concern our mutual interest and happiness.

Brothers:

It gives me great uneasiness that our people trespass on your lands, and that your young men are afraid to go a hunting on account of our People ranging the woods & marking the trees; these things I can assure you are against the orders of your Elder Brother, and are not approved of by me and the good Men of North Carolina, but while we were consulting our Council at Philadelphia our bad Men living near your lands thought we had laid aside all Government over them, and that they had a right to do as they pleased & not willing to obey any law, for the sake of ill gain & profit care not what mischief they do between the Red & White People if they can enrich themselves, but Brothers, I know your Complaints and will endeavor to set your minds at ease by again ordering off all these persons from your lands who have settled on them without your consent. Your friend, General Sevier, is made our first warrior for the Western Country, to whom Col. Martin carries my particular directions to have these intruders moved off. About the 25th of April I propose to meet you and such of your beloved men as will please to attend at the great Island in Holston, or other place most agreeable to you on Broad or that River. I shall bring with me some of our first Men who will assist in the talks in whom, as well as myself, you can place your confidence and trust. I propose to bring with me the goods which in my last talk I informed you were intended to purchase your right and claim to some of the lands near you; that a line be drawn and marked between your people and ours, which shall be the bounds in future and over which our people shall not go and settle upon without being highly punished.

Brothers:

In the mean while I beg you will not listen to any bad talks which may be made by either Red or White People which may disturb our peace and good will to each other, and should mischief be done by any of our bad people be patient until you see me or hear from me, and you may be certain your Elder Brother of North Carolina will do everything in his power to give your minds satisfaction.

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I am told the Northern Indians have sent you some bad talks, but do not hear them, as they wish to make variance between all the Red & American people without any provocation. But should they take up the hatchet against us, I shall be happy we can still take you by the hand in love & friendship, and let them seek their own destruction; this must certainly be the case as the people of the Thirteen United States could not be conquered by the Great King of England and his Warriors, the first and most terrible over the Big Waters, and who made all Nations before them tremble by their dreadful ships & many men; what can the power of those unfriendly Indians do when opposed to so many tried warriors as will be immediately called out against them should they persist in their evil designs?

Brothers:

Col. Martin, your friend, has told me your grievances; I wish to redress them as soon as possible. I cannot come to you sooner than I have proposed. Bad men may make you uneasy, but your elder Brother of North Carolina has you greatly in his heart, and wishes to make you sensible of it.