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Resolution by the Continental Congress concerning the Constitutional Convention, including circular letter from Charles Thomson to the state governors
United States. Continental Congress
February 21, 1787
Volume 20, Pages 614-615

HON. CHAS. THOMAS, SECRETARY OF CONGRESS, TO GOV. CASWELL
(From Executive Letter Book.)


Office of Secretary of Congress,
February 21st, 1787.

(Circular.)

Sir:

I have the honor to transmit to your Excellency herewith enclosed an Act of the United States in Congress Assembled, and am

With Great Respect, Your Excellency’s
Most Obedient and Most Humble Servant,
CHAS. THOMSON.

-------------------- page 615 --------------------
RESOLVES OF CONGRESS.
(From Executive Letter Book.)

By the United States in Congress Assembled,
February 21st, 1787.

Whereas, there is provision in the Articles of Confederation and perpetual Union for making alterations therein by the assent of a Congress of the United States and of the Legislature of the several States; And Whereas, experience hath evinced that there are defects in the present Confederation, as a means to Remedy which several of the States, and particular the State of New York, by Express Instructions to their Delegates in Congress have suggested a Convention for the purposes expressed in the following Resolution, and such Convention appearing to be the most probable means of establishing in these States a firm National Government.

Resolved, That in the opinion of Congress, it is expedient that on the second Monday in May next a Convention of Delegates who shall have been appointed by the several States, be held at Philadelphia, for the sole and express purpose of revising the Articles of Confederation and Reporting to Congress and the several Legislatures such alterations and provisions therein as shall when Agreed to in Congress and Confirmed by the States under the Federal Constitution be adequate to the Exigencies of Government and the preservation of the Union.

CHAS. THOMSON.