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Letter from Hugh Williamson to Samuel Johnston
Williamson, Hugh, 1735-1819
September 05, 1789
Volume 21, Pages 563-564

HON. HUGH WILLIAMSON TO GOVERNOR JOHNSTON.
[From Executive Letter Book.]

New York, 5th September, 1789.

Sir:

You have been informed that a peace with the Southern Indians is taken up by Congress as a serious Object and the business seems now to be in a fair Train. Twenty thousand dollars are appropriated to discharge the Expences, and the Commissioners Genl. Lincoln, Cyrus Griffin & Col. Humphries sailed on Monday last for Georgia to attend at a Treaty to be held on this Month. They have with them a Guard of fifty Continental Soldiers. It appears to me that the Safety and Peace of our Citizens in the Western Country is more or less affected by every Treaty that is held with Southern Indians. Two Cherokees who lately arrived here by and with their Complaints are gone in Company with the Commissioners. I wish to take an early opportunity of impressing the Commissioners with the absolute necessity of prevailing on the Indians to relinquish all claims to the Lands on which our People are settled; with this view I threw a few sentiments on that Subject into the form of a Letter, which I handed the Commissioners. Inclosed you have a Copy. It is a Subject to which I never had adverted but with pain, for though I never knew a man with more humanity or more Integrity than the Gentleman who was at the Head of the Commissioners who made the Hopewell Treaty, yet I cannot admit of a Doubt but the settlers must be quieted even though it becomes necessary to make another purchase of those Lands from the Indians.

You have also inclosed the copy of a Memorial I thought it my duty to present to Congress in behalf of our Commerce. I hope the paper does not require other explanation. The subject is under

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commitment and you shall be informed whether Congress think fit to alter their Law. I am aware that our wishes may not be a little thwarted by numerous Petitions come or coming from Rhode Island. Those people seem to be asking things that are not safely to be granted.

I am, &c.,
HU. WILLIAMSON.