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Colonial and State Records of North Carolina
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Declaration by John Montgomery concerning his military service in the Revolutionary War
Montgomery, John, d. 1744
Volume 22, Pages 151-152

JOHN MONTGOMERY.

He stated in August, 1832, that he was residing in Guilford Co., N. C., and he was born in Lancaster Co., Penn. In 1767 he moved with his father to Guilford Co., N. C., where since living. He stated in August, 1832, that he was 69 years old.

In the latter part of 1780 he volunteered with Capt. Bell who marched up the Yadkin River after a band of Tories, but as they had been routed by the Militia from Surry County, he returned home,—absent more than one week. Shortly after, he volunteered under Capt. McReak in Maj. Blair’s command, going up Abbott’s Creek, in Stokes Co., after Tories who were dispersed. Absent two weeks in December, 1780. Immediately following, he marched as a Volunteer under Capt. Forbis, Cols. Paisly and Martin, to join General Greene (who was retreating from before the British), in Caswell Co.,

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thence with him to Halifax, C. H., Va., where information was received of the ravages of the Tories in the neighborhood of Capt. Forbis, who obtained permission to return home with his Company (after six weeks absence). When they reached Guilford, the Tories had fled the County, and Capt. Forbis resolved to join the army again, but before leaving Guilford, prisoners were sent to him to guard, of which guard Montgomery was one and he was on that duty when the battle was fought at Guilford (March 15th, 1781). After the battle he was released from the care of prisoners to go to Randolph County against some Tories gathered in the High Hills, called the Caraway Mountains. (About 10 weeks.) The September following he volunteered with Capt. Stewart who marched in the command of Col. Martin and General Rutherford down the country to near Wilmington, and was engaged to near Christmas checking the ravages of British and Tories, who often turned out in parties to plunder and destroy plantations. About three months.