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116 images with subject Women.

  • "'Now Andy,' said old Kit, replacing the cheese on Andy's nose." From Some Adventures of Captain Simon Suggs, Late of the Tallapoosa Volunteers; Together with "Taking the Census," and Other Alabama Sketches. By a Country Editor with a Portrait from Life, and Other Illustrations, by Darley.


  • "'YOU BETTER PUT ON A THICKER COAT, BUD'" From An Elephant's Track and Other Stories.


  • "A beautiful face bent above him" From The Traitor: A Story of the Fall of the Invisible Empire.


  • "IT WAS ONLY FÉLICE" From An Elephant's Track and Other Stories.


  • "IT YIELDED SUDDENLY, AS IF OPENED FROM WITHIN" From An Elephant's Track and Other Stories.


  • "SHE FLUSHED AND HER BROWN EYES DROOPED" From An Elephant's Track and Other Stories.


  • "SHE TURNED SLOWLY" [Frontispiece Image] From An Elephant's Track and Other Stories.


  • "Stella stared at the lifeless form" From The Traitor: A Story of the Fall of the Invisible Empire.


  • [Frontispiece Image] "The High Court of Justice of the Anglo-Saxon race suddenly transformed into a Negro minstrel farce" [See page 306] From The Traitor: A Story of the Fall of the Invisible Empire.


  • [Frontispiece Image] From Horse-Shoe Robinson: A Tale of the Tory Ascendency.


  • [Illustration] From Pine Needles, 1921.


  • [Illustration] From Uncle Remus, His Songs and His Sayings: The Folk-Lore of the Old Plantation. By Joel Chandler Harris. With Illustrations by Frederick S. Church and James H. Moser.


  • [Illustration] From Uncle Remus, His Songs and His Sayings: The Folk-Lore of the Old Plantation. By Joel Chandler Harris. With Illustrations by Frederick S. Church and James H. Moser.


  • "A MOUNTAIN PINK!" From Dialect Tales.


  • "A paleness more ghastly than that of death come over the widow's face as she heard the sentence. Falling to the earth, she groveled at the feet of Captain Suggs." From Some Adventures of Captain Simon Suggs, Late of the Tallapoosa Volunteers; Together with "Taking the Census," and Other Alabama Sketches. By a Country Editor with a Portrait from Life, and Other Illustrations, by Darley.


  • "Ah! many a gallant loved her well In those old days." From Poems of Paul Hamilton Hayne.


  • "ALL THAT DAY WAS DESPONDENCY, DEJECTION." From Balcony Stories.


  • "And, on nearing the arbor, was struck with surprise at seeing some one with her." From The Rivals: A Chickahominy Story.


  • ANTOINETTE POLK. Baronne de Charette. From Memoirs of a Southern Woman "Within the Lines," and a Genealogical Record.


  • "At this point he called Charley to him, and taking his hand, placed Nellie's in it," &c. From The Rivals: A Chickahominy Story.


  • BART DAVIS'S DANCE. "Black silk in h-ll is thar', scream'd she, a-hissin' like onto a cat, an' commenced a-pullin' up by the roots his long har like it wer flax." From Sut Lovingood. Yarns Spun by a "Nat'ral Born Durn'd Fool." Warped and Wove for Public Wear.


  • THE BEGGAR. Page 435. From Tupelo.


  • Belle Kearney [Frontispiece Image] From A Slaveholder's Daughter.


  • CHARLOTTE CUSHMAN. From My Day: Reminiscences of a Long Life.


  • CLARICE From Diary of a Refugee.


  • CLAUDIA AND EULALIA. From The Planter's Northern Bride.


  • "Come, sweetheart, hear me!" From Poems of Paul Hamilton Hayne.


  • "COULDN'T I SLEEP IN DE KITCHEN?" From Dialect Tales.


  • [Cover Image] From A Belle of the Fifties: Memoirs of Mrs. Clay, of Alabama, Covering Social and Political Life in Washington and the South, 1853-66.


  • [Cover Image] From My Own Life, or, A Deserted Wife.


  • A DAIRY FARM. From Life on the Mississippi.


  • "Dancing! I love it, night or day: There's nought on earth so jolly." From Poems of Paul Hamilton Hayne.


  • DR. WILLIAM J. POLK. MRS. WILLIAM J. POLK. Née Mary R. A. Long. From Memoirs of a Southern Woman "Within the Lines," and a Genealogical Record.


  • ELIZA RIPLEY From Social Life in Old New Orleans. Being Recollections of My Girlhood.


  • Elizabeth Dean From Original Acrostics on All the States and Presidents of the United States, and Various Other Subjects, Religious, Political, and Personal. Illustrated with Portraits of All the Presidents, and Engravings of Various Other Kinds.


  • EULALIA AND THE NIGHTMARE. From The Planter's Northern Bride.


  • Fashion Review at N. C. C. W. Morning Dress Sport Clothes Afternoon Dress Evening Dress From Pine Needles, 1921.


  • THE FIRST COMMUNION. From Balcony Stories.


  • "The flowers that wreathe my humble hearth With roseate blush and bloom." From Poems of Paul Hamilton Hayne.


  • "For five full seconds, it would seem As if you really thought, coquette, On something grave." From Poems of Paul Hamilton Hayne.


  • [Frontispiece Image] From A Night in Acadie.


  • GAMBLING FOR A SLAVE. From My Southern Home: or, The South and Its People.


  • GUESTS. From Life on the Mississippi.


  • HELENA MODJESKA. From My Day: Reminiscences of a Long Life.


  • "HER HEART DROVE HER TO THE WINDOW." From Balcony Stories.


  • "I WEPT, I WEPT, I WEPT" From Balcony Stories.


  • [Illustration] From Poems of Paul Hamilton Hayne.


  • [Illustration] From Pine Needles, 1921.


  • [Illustration] From Pine Needles, 1921.


  • "In a massive Elizabethan chair of blackened oak a stately old lady was sitting straight and stiff." From The Deliverance: A Romance of the Virginia Tobacco Fields.


  • "IT WUZ ANNIKY'S TEEF." From Dialect Tales.


  • "JACK APPLE STEPPED IN, AN OPEN CLASP- KNIFE IN ONE HAND." From Dialect Tales.


  • JOANNA P. MOORE From photograph taken in 1898 [Frontispiece Image] From "In Christ's Stead": Autobiographical Sketches.


  • JOANNA P. MOORE IN 1867 From "In Christ's Stead": Autobiographical Sketches.


  • JOANNA P. MOORE IN 1880 From "In Christ's Stead": Autobiographical Sketches.


  • From a photograph taken in 1885. I still keep tight hold of the Bible. My new year's message for 1902 is: "Now the God of hope fill with all joy and peace in believing, that ye may abound in hope through the power of the Holy Spirit" (Rom. 15:13). Oh, beloved friends, be hopeful, be courageous. God cannot use discouraged people. The above text tells us we get our hopefulness by faith and in the power of the Holy Spirit. Free for all. Take and rejoice. SISTER JOANNA P. MOORE. From "In Christ's Stead": Autobiographical Sketches.


  • "The kingdom's princeliest youth besiege her ear." From Poems of Paul Hamilton Hayne.


  • MADAME RAYMONDE-ARNAULT From An Elephant's Track and Other Stories.


  • "MARS' TOM SAY HE DONE GIN OUT DE NOTION." From Dialect Tales.


  • MAST AND ALL WENT OVERBOARD From To Have and to Hold.


  • [MIMI] From Balcony Stories.


  • MISS JACKSON. MISS MOORE. MISS WILSON (Mrs. Weaver). MISS BUTLER. MISS PECK From "In Christ's Stead": Autobiographical Sketches.


  • Miss Joanna P. Moore, Nashville, Tenn., thirty years Missionary to the Colored People of the South. From The Cyclopedia of the Colored Baptists of Alabama: Their Leaders and Their Work.


  • MISS MEADOWS EN DE GALS. From Uncle Remus, His Songs and His Sayings: The Folk-Lore of the Old Plantation. By Joel Chandler Harris. With Illustrations by Frederick S. Church and James H. Moser.


  • MISSES AND HER SERVANT. From Fifty Years of Slavery in the United States of America.


  • MISSES SALONE. From Fifty Years of Slavery in the United States of America.


  • MISSION SCHOOL, ROTIFUNK, AFRICA. From An Autobiography: The Story of the Lord's Dealings with Mrs. Amanda Smith, the Colored Evangelist: Containing an Account of Her Life Work of Faith, and Her Travels in America, England, Ireland, Scotland, India, and Africa as an Independent Missionary.


  • MORELAND ENTERING NANCY'S COTTAGE. [Second Frontispiece Image] From The Planter's Northern Bride.


  • MR. AND MRS. MORELAND AND ALBERT. [First Frontispiece Image] From The Planter's Northern Bride.


  • MR. BRAINARD AND EULALIA. From The Planter's Northern Bride.


  • MRS. CLAY Of Alabama [Frontispiece Image] From A Belle of the Fifties: Memoirs of Mrs. Clay, of Alabama, Covering Social and Political Life in Washington and the South, 1853-66.


  • MRS. HARRIET BEECHER STOWE, AUTHOR OF UNCLE TOM'S CABIN. From The Tragedy of the Negro in America: a Condensed History of the Enslavement, Sufferings, Emancipation, Present Condition and Progress of the Negro Race in the United States of America.


  • MRS. HARRIET BEECHER STOWE. See page 244. From An Autobiography of the Rev. Josiah Henson ("Uncle Tom"). From 1789 to 1881. With a Preface by Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Introductory Notes by George Sturge, S. Morley, Esq., M. P., Wendell Phillips, and John G. Whittier. Edited by John Lobb, F.R.G.S. Revised and Enlarged.


  • MRS. HARRIET BEECHER STOWE. See Page 212. From Uncle Tom's Story of His Life. An Autobiography of the Rev. Josiah Henson (Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe's "Uncle Tom"). From 1789 to 1876. With a Preface by Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe, and an Introductory Note by George Sturge, and S. Morley, Esq., M. P.


  • MRS. M. FRENCH-SHELDON, F. R. G. S. Lecturer on Africa Organizer and Leader of an Independent Expedition for the Exploration of the region of Kilima-Njaro in East Africa; Author of "From Sultan to Sultan" From Africa and the American Negro: Addresses and Proceedings of the Congress on Africa: Held under the Auspices of the Stewart Missionary Foundation for Africa of Gammon Theological Seminary in Connection with the Cotton States and International Exposition December 13-15, 1895.


  • "MRS. MANNING STUMBLED FORWARD" From An Elephant's Track and Other Stories.


  • "Mrs. Naron flew at the child with an energy that contrasted strongly with her oleaginous appearance; and seizing him by the middle, held him up inverted with one hand." From Some Adventures of Captain Simon Suggs, Late of the Tallapoosa Volunteers; Together with "Taking the Census," and Other Alabama Sketches. By a Country Editor with a Portrait from Life, and Other Illustrations, by Darley.


  • MRS. SARAH PEPPER GAINES From My Southern Home: or, The South and Its People.


  • " 'My sweet sister!' " From The Clansman: An Historical Romance of the Ku Klux Klan.


  • MY SWEETHEART'S FACE From With Sabre and Scalpel; the Autobiography of a Soldier and Surgeon.


  • "No, no, carry her to my room--to my bed."--Page 76. From The Story of a Slave. A Realistic Revelation of a Social Relation of Slave Times--Hitherto Unwritten--From the Pen of One Who Has Felt Both the Lash and the Caress of a Mistress.


  • No. 8. [Foster Mother.] From Progressive Missions in the South and Addresses with Illustrations and Sketches of Missionary Workers and Ministers and Bishops' Wives.


  • No. 85. [Sister Joanna Moore.] From Progressive Missions in the South and Addresses with Illustrations and Sketches of Missionary Workers and Ministers and Bishops' Wives.


  • " 'NONE O' YO' SHOOTIN',' SAID SINCERITY." From Dialect Tales.


  • "O'er all the fragrant land this harvest day, What bounteous sheaves are garnered, ear and blade." From Poems of Paul Hamilton Hayne.


  • "Oh, Miss Jinny, please do--doan be too hahd on me."--Page 49. From The Story of a Slave. A Realistic Revelation of a Social Relation of Slave Times--Hitherto Unwritten--From the Pen of One Who Has Felt Both the Lash and the Caress of a Mistress.


  • "Old passions may be purged of blood, Old memories cannot die." From Poems of Paul Hamilton Hayne.


  • "On the brink of the precipice the mother trembled." From The Clansman: An Historical Romance of the Ku Klux Klan.


  • "Our hopes in youth are like those roseate shadows Cast by the sunlight on the dewy grass." From Poems of Paul Hamilton Hayne.


  • "Pale memory near us." From Poems of Paul Hamilton Hayne.


  • Part III. Persons and Things. From Original Acrostics on All the States and Presidents of the United States, and Various Other Subjects, Religious, Political, and Personal. Illustrated with Portraits of All the Presidents, and Engravings of Various Other Kinds.


  • "'Read yourself—this once,' he pleaded, 'and let me listen.'" See page 435 [Frontispiece Image] From The Deliverance: A Romance of the Virginia Tobacco Fields.


  • REPAIRING DAMAGES. From Dialect Tales.


  • THE ROOM IN THE OLD GALLERY. From Balcony Stories.


  • Ruth, The Moabitess. From Original Acrostics on All the States and Presidents of the United States, and Various Other Subjects, Religious, Political, and Personal. Illustrated with Portraits of All the Presidents, and Engravings of Various Other Kinds.


  • SATAN CAME ALSO. "You have not asked about Satan," said Mr. Le Moyne suddenly one day. "Why should I ?" she replied, "If that personage will be equally forgetful of me, I am sure I shall be very glad."--p. 298. From Bricks Without Straw: A Novel.


  • "SHE LEANED HER HEAD AGAINST A TREE." From Dialect Tales.


  • SISTER COMPTON. From Life of Lucius B. Compton, the Mountain Evangelist, or, From the Depths of Sin to the Heights of Holiness.


  • THE SISTERS BID HER GOOD-BY. From Balcony Stories.


  • [Two Illustrations] From Narrative of William Hayden, Containing a Faithful Account of His Travels for a Number of Years, Whilst a Slave, in the South. Written by Himself.


  • "Stand!" said he, as the old lady was climbing the fence. From Some Adventures of Captain Simon Suggs, Late of the Tallapoosa Volunteers; Together with "Taking the Census," and Other Alabama Sketches. By a Country Editor with a Portrait from Life, and Other Illustrations, by Darley.


  • THE BRAN DANCE. From Dialect Tales.


  • "The canvas speaks." From Poems of Paul Hamilton Hayne.


  • "THE PEDDLER COULD HARDLY KEEP BACK A SHOUT." From Dialect Tales.


  • "THIS TIME WE HAVE CAUGHT IT!" From Balcony Stories.


  • "TO POSE IN ABJECT PATIENCE AND AWKWARDNESS." From Balcony Stories.


  • "TURNED TO HER DOMESTIC DUTIES." From Balcony Stories.


  • VIRGINIA [Frontispiece Image] From Virginia.


  • "...waited for the oxen to reach the summit of the hill." From The Deliverance: A Romance of the Virginia Tobacco Fields.


  • "WALKING AWAY WITH A SHRUG OF THE SHOULDERS." From Balcony Stories.


  • WATCHING A LANDING. From Balcony Stories.


  • "Where is that idiot, that dolt, that sluggard, that snail, with my mail?" From Balcony Stories.


  • [Illustration] From Our Own Third Reader: for the Use of Schools and Families.


  • [Illustration] From Original Acrostics on All the States and Presidents of the United States, and Various Other Subjects, Religious, Political, and Personal. Illustrated with Portraits of All the Presidents, and Engravings of Various Other Kinds.


  • THE WRITER OF THE DIARY From Diary of a Refugee.


  • Yours Truly Catharine Coffin. [2nd Frontispiece Image] From Reminiscences of Levi Coffin, the Reputed President of the Underground Railroad: Being a Brief History of the Labors of a Lifetime in Behalf of the Slave, with the Stories of Numerous Fugitives, Who Gained Their Freedom through His Instrumentality, and Many Other Incidents.