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11 images with subject Soldiers--France--1910-1920.

  • BOMB AND SHELL ATTACK, ANCEMONT, FRANCE A peculiar buzz in the air, the rapid crack of machine guns, and a tremendous thug-bang; we knew that "Heiney" was after us. Some of us said our prayers a thousand times a minute while others ran helter-skelter in search for safety. Thanks to the big dugout that happened to be near. From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • BURIAL OF LIEUT. ALLAN W. DOUGLASS Lieut. Allan W. Douglass, of Battery E, was killed near Limey on the morning of September 12, 1918. He was buried not far from where he fell. Colonel Cox and his orderly were the only members of the regiment present. The German prisoners in the picture dug the grave. A passing Y. M. C. A. man conducted the funeral service. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • Fast action in the St. Mihiel drive, when there was no time to think of concealment. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • HERE IS A CAMOUFLAGED GUN ON THE BATTLE FRONT IN CHARGE OF NORTH CAROLINA MEN. EXPERTS STATED THIS WAS ONE OF THE BEST PIECES OF CAMOUFLAGING SEEN ANYWHERE DURING THE WAR. From "Lest We Forget." The Record of North Carolina's Own.


  • HOMEWARD BOUND "Tramp, Tramp, Tramp, the boys are marching," with smiling faces, uniform packs and the little Red Cross bags. We are on our way to the docks at Brest, France, where we shall embark for the good old U. S. A. While the passenger list was being checked the band was playing and the smiling faces of Red Cross girls were bidding us good-bye and a "bon voyage." From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • On the march in the Argonne. German prisoners resting by the road-side. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • OUR FIRST GAS ATTACK Just as we entered the woods near Brocourt we received a welcome that sounded like a hundred thousand Fords--Gr, Gr, Gr, Gr, Gr, then a crack and a boom, boom, then someone said GAS. Scared? No, we were paralyzed--didn't know whether to put on our gas masks or turn and run. Finally our masks were on and then somebody gave: "Permission is given to remove face pieces." We would not mind the gas alarm so much if it wouldn't come around meal times. From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • THIRTIETH DIVISION HEADQUARTERS IN FRANCE JUST BEFORE THE WAR ENDED From "Lest We Forget." The Record of North Carolina's Own.


  • THIS IS A GERMAN TRUCK CAPTURED BY AMERICANS. IN TRYING TO RECAPTURE THE WAGON THE GERMANS WERE BEATEN OFF BUT SUCCEEDED IN PUNCTURING THE GASOLINE TANK WITH BULLETS. THE YANKS, HOWEVER, DROVE TO SAFETY BY FEEDING GAS FROM AN OIL CAN. From "Lest We Forget." The Record of North Carolina's Own.


  • THREE NORTH CAROLINA DOUGH-BOYS PAYING LAST RESPECTS TO THE REMAINS OF THEIR KITCHEN WHICH HAS JUST BEEN HIT BY A BOMB DROPPED FROM A GERMAN `PLANE, "CHOW" BEING SCATTERED IN EVERF DIRECTION. From "Lest We Forget." The Record of North Carolina's Own.


  • TROOP TRAIN FROM MONTOIR TO LE MANS The little toy engine and the "flat wheel coaches," can we ever forget 'em. Yes, we were lucky on this trip in not having to ride in "Homes 40 and Chaveux 8." (A box car whose capacity is 40 men or 8 horses.) Along the route in each village the population would turn out to bid us "good-bye," and the children would ask for cigarettes. From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).