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7 images with subject War damage--France--1910-1920.

  • IN THE WAKE OF THE HUNS Closely allied with the Hun's scheme of frightfulness was his policy of destruction, and woe be unto that town within the range of his guns. Not satisfied with the partial annihilation of a town and the hasty depopulation of its inhabitants, they continue their ruthless plan of devastation by hurling shrapnel, gas and high explosives at their doomed objective until the town is an irreparable heap of crumpled walls and ruins. From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • One of the Batteries of the One Hundred and Thirteenth Field Artillery seeking a billet in a ruined French village on the long hard hike from the St. Mihiel Front to the Argonne. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • One of the best-preserved buildings in Vaux, a little French village half way between the regimental positions in the Foret de la Montagne and Troyon. Vaux, St. Remy, Dommartain, Herbeuville and Hannonville were almost completely demolished. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • Ruins of the "Gare" at Jaulny, a little town near Thiacourt, not far from the positions occupied by the First Battalion on September 15, 1918. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • Ruins of the old church at Flirey, on the St. Mihiel sector. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • This point was headquarters of the 89th Division during the St. Mihiel offensive for a time and it also served as headquarters of the 55th F. A. Brigade during the same engagement. It was near Flirey. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • This sketch will give you some faint conception of the effect of high explosive shells. I take no man's word for this, as it came under my personal observation. People often ask the question: "How does it seem to be hit by a piece of a shell?" And it was probably never better answered than by the British Tommy, who said: "First you 'ears a 'ell of a noise, next you see a nurse bendin' over you, an' 'ear 'er say, 'See if you can drink some of this.'" For months you have been seeing in the papers pictures of demolished villages and shell pitted areas, and perhaps you have wondered whether or not the pictures were overdrawn. Let me assure you that they were not, for many and many a time I have gazed on artillery effects that it would be mpossible to exaggerate. Instances are related of heroic French artillerymen who have shelled their own homes to fragments because German soldiers had taken possession of, and were occupying them. How can Germany or any other nation expect to crush a people of such indomitable resolution? From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).