Documenting the American South Logo
Loading

First Annual Statement of the Trade and Commerce of Memphis,
for the Year Ending August 31, 1861.
Reported to the Memphis Chamber of Commerce by Jno. S. Toof, Secretary:

Electronic Edition.

Memphis Chamber of Commerce.


Funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services
supported the electronic publication of this title.


Text scanned (OCR) by Christie Mawhinney
Images scanned by Katherine Anderson
Text encoded by Katherine Anderson and Jill Kuhn
First edition, 2000
ca. 365K
Academic Affairs Library, UNC-CH
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
2000.

        © This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text.

Source Description:
(title page) First Annual Statement of the Trade and Commerce of Memphis, for the Year ending August 31, 1861. Reported to the Memphis Chamber of Commerce by Jno. S. Toof, Secretary.
Toof, Jno. S. (John S.).
37 p.
Memphis
O'Neill & Parrish, Printers, 13 Madison Street.
1861.
Call number 2147.8 Conf (Rare Book Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)


        The electronic edition is a part of the UNC-CH digitization project, Documenting the American South.
        This electronic edition has been created by Optical Character Recognition (OCR). OCR-ed text has been compared against the original document and corrected. The text has been encoded using the recommendations for Level 4 of the TEI in Libraries Guidelines.
        Original grammar, punctuation, and spelling have been preserved. Encountered typographical errors have been preserved, and appear in red type.
        All footnotes are moved to the end of paragraphs in which the reference occurs.
        The tables on pages 16, 20 and 22 have been scanned as images.
        Any hyphens occurring in line breaks have been removed, and the trailing part of a word has been joined to the preceding line.
        All quotation marks, em dashes and ampersand have been transcribed as entity references.
        All double right and left quotation marks are encoded as " and " respectively.
        All em dashes are encoded as --
        Indentation in lines has not been preserved.
        Running titles have not been preserved.
        Spell-check and verification made against printed text using Author/Editor (SoftQuad) and Microsoft Word spell check programs.


Library of Congress Subject Headings, 21st edition, 1998

Languages Used:

LC Subject Headings:


Revision History:


        

Illustration


        

Illustration


FIRST ANNUAL STATEMENT
OF THE
TRADE AND COMMERCE
OF
MEMPHIS,
FOR
THE YEAR ENDING AUGUST 31, 1861. REPORTED TO THE
MEMPHIS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
BY
JNO. S. TOOF,
SECRETARY.

MEMPHIS:
O'NEILL & PARRISH, PRINTERS, 13 MADISON STREET.
1861.


Page 2

OFFICERS.


Page 3

ANNUAL STATEMENT.

To THOMAS W. HUNT, Esq., President of the Chamber of Commerce:

        SIR: The commercial year of 1860-'61 having reached its close, it becomes my duty, as Secretary of this institution, to present through you to its members and the public in general, a condensed statement and digest of the business operations of the city during the past twelve months, so far as they may have come under my observation. In the discharge of this task, imposed upon me by the rules of the Chamber, I shall endeavor at all times to bear in mind that facts and figures are the only reliable basis for any correct expose of business and commercial affairs, and shall refrain, as far as possible, from indulging in remarks and speculations upon any and all subjects not warranted by the official figures, tables and statements, herewith presented.

         In very many respects, the past year has been the most remarkable in the history of our city and country. It has witnessed the disruption of a corrupt National Government and the establishment, over eleven of our sister Southern States, of a vigorous, equitable, republican administration, based open the will of the people and a just regard for their rights and material interests. That events of such magnitude should transpire in any country, unattended by marked influences upon its commercial interests, were impossible; and while we find that the blighting effects of a national revolution have arrested or annihilated the business of almost every city and town in the country, Memphis has suffered to an incomparably limited extent, and that the aggregate of her trade has been larger than in any previous year. And what is still more remarkable, it will also be seen that in all the articles of prime necessity this increase has continued through the dull mouths of summer and in a state of actual hostilities around us. The fountains of our prosperity and growth have had, in the political and commercial convulsions of the year, a severe and searching test of their depths and strength. The rapid and unparalleled growth of Memphis during the past five years has, to many, appeared to be unsubstantial and precocious--the result of fortuitous and fortunate circumstances, which the first revulsion in the affairs of the country would dissipate or seriously disturb-- but the commercial statement we present, considered with the important events of the year, proves that the currents of our trade are as sure and unfailing as that of the mighty Mississippi, on which much of it is borne-- fluctuating with the seasons, but nothing interrupting their flow. With these and other evidences of the indestructible advantages of our geographical position, and of the immense benefits of our present works of internal improvement, the people of Memphis may confidently look forward--when peace, with its benign influences, shall restore the trade of the country to its wonted activity, and the independence of the new Confederacy assure protection from Northern competition to our home industry and interprise-- to a career of unparalleled growth and prosperity.

         The disastrous events--in a commercial sense--of the past year have proven to us the incalculable advantages of our railroads, which have preserved our prosperity in the midst of political and financial convulsions that have overthrown the old Republic, and given us, in the midst of these stirring scenes, a rich return for all our past labors may well be asked, would be the condition of Memphis now without her roads? Instead of the life and active industry they now exhibit, in the very midst of war's alarums, the deserted condition of our streets and thoroughfares would furnish but a sorrowful counterpart of those of hundreds of Northern cities. In contemplating our present happy condition, our people should be deeply impressed with the obligations they are under to the public-spirited and noble men whose genius and energy accomplished the works that have conferred so many benefits upon the city. Over the grave of "JONES" a monument should be reared that shall carry his name to the latest posterity as the great and disinterested benefactor of the city.

         As fortunate as we are, comparatively, in our commercial affairs, how many additional advantages could we


Page 4

have secured to ourselves, had we, a few years ago, put forth our strength and completed our road to Little Rock and Fort Smith and built the projected road to the Iron Mountain, and by it had, during the. last few months, open communication with St. Louis? The sacrifices we have made this summer, for the want of the latter road, would have paid a good share of its cost. If the Confederacy shall include Missouri, that road will be hereafter a political and commercial necessity to preserve our intercourse with a sister State, from the hostile interruptions of the inveterate republicans of Illinois. When hostilities shall cease, and re-established laws shall restore credit and bring back the arts and pursuits of peace, the energies of the people of Memphis should at once be directed to the construction of all her projected railroads. The first built should be the Iron Mountain Road; then a road direct to Jackson, Miss., on the cast the Yazoo Valley: another direct to Vicksburg; the Little Rock Road should be pushed on to Red River in the southwest, to connect with the Texas roads and the western branch to Fort Smith and the rich prairie country beyond. These great works done, Memphis might securely and confidently await the development of the country beyond the Mississippi to make her the great interior mart of the Southwest. Her growth in population and in wealth would eclipse the past history of St, Louis, which, henceforth cut off from her free-State trade, and as a border city, must necessarily decline. While these great works are being accomplished by combined public effort, our citizens should individually improve the rich fields for private enterprise in the various mechanical and manufacturing pursuits, which our political separation from the North will open to them. Our success for the past four months in the new branches of productive industry, teach us how much we can do for ourselves when forced to be self-dependent. If the people of Memphis will properly improve her advantages, the independence Of the Confederacy and the emancipation of Southern mechanical labor from its tbraldom to the North will make our city a hive of busy industry. Her close proximity to and unrivalled facilities for the distribution of her productions on the roads and rivers of which she is the focus, the consummate skill of our mechanics and artisans, the large number of manufacturing establishments already in successful operation, are among the innumerable advantages which should speedily render her the great cotton manufacturing depot and machine shop of the Mississippi Valley, as well as the seat of large manufacturing concerns in every branch of industry.

         The absence, heretofore, of any rigid system of statistics as to the receipts of general articles into the city, deprives us of the opportunity of instituting a comparison as to the relative increase or decrease of importations during the past year, as compared with former seasons. Enough is known, however, to warrant the statement that, in many of the leading articles of produce and merchandise, including pork and bacon, dry-goods, sugar, coffee and molasses, tobacco, (leaf and manufactured.) flour, corn, oats, hay, potatoes, coal, drugs, live stock, whisky, leather, powder, ice, cotton seed, and various manufactured articles, the year's receipts have been the largest in the history of the city; while, on the other hand, we find very few articles in which there has been a decrease--cotton (in which the falling off in receipts is comparatively small) being the only prominent article in which the reverse has been observable. When it is recollected that during almost one-half of the year we have been partially blockaded from our usual sources of supply in various departments of merchandise, these facts are doubly significant as indicating the rapid growth and expansion of our trade.

         It would be unjust to close these preliminary remarks without special reference to the effect, upon our business men, of the financial revulsions of the year. The financial panic which presaged the coming storm of war swept over the country early in the fall, when our city was just entering upon the immense trade incident to the season, and when her commercial interests, being more widely extended, were of course most susceptible to such influences. That some interruptions and derangements in business circles resulted from this cause, all must admit, but that our merchants and traders breasted the storm nobly and weathered it without the occurrence of a single failure or suspension, are facts which speaks potentially in their favor, and furnish the best evidence that the business men and capitalists of Memphis base their operations upon a solid and substantial foundation, which the severest financial end revulsions fail to unsettle or seriously disturb. How these facts compare with the result elsewhere witnessed, especially throughout the cities of the North, are matters of history, and furnish their own comment and suggestions.

OPERATIONS OF THE CHAMBER.

         Many subjects of vital interest and importance have received the attention of the Chamber of Commerce since its organization, some of which it may not be improper to refer to at this time. Early in the past year numerous complaints were received from foreign and domestic Cotton buyers and manufacturers, that many of the bales sent from this market proved, upon inspection, to be "mixed-packed," containing two or more qualities of the staple, and often intermixed with dust and sand. The manifest injury to the character and standing of our market which this state of affairs would necessarily occasion, if permitted to continue, caused the subject to be laid before the Chamber, and at the regular May meeting a committee of experienced Cotton dealers was appointed to prepare an address to the planting interest upon the subject, inviting their attention to the evil, with a view to its permanent eradication. The report of this committee-- ably reviewing the subject in all its bearings, and recommending the proper course to be adopted in the future-- was soon after submitted, ordered to be printed, and a large number of copies circulated throughout the country trading to Memphis. The high reputation sustained by Memphis Cottons during the past year for cleanliness and proper care in handling and packing, and the entire absence of the complaints above referred to, furnish substantial evidence that the action of the Chamber has not been without the happiest results.

         Several modifications and alterations of the city laws, respecting inspections of liquors and merchandise; also in relation to tax on merchants' privileges, etc., were suggested by the Chamber, and adopted by the city government.

         The financial troubles which began to oppress the country early in November, seemed imperatively to require a


Page 5

suspension of specie payment by the banks of Tennessee, in common with those of nearly every other commercial city and State in the country. The question came before the Chamber at its November meeting, a series of resolutions to the proper effect were proposed and adopted, and on the following day the banks of the city acquiesced in the movement, and were soon followed by those of the entire State. The wisdom of this policy has since been manifest to the satisfaction of all classes.

         At the January meeting the passage of a "Stay Law" By the Legislature then in session, was made known. Resolutions depreciating the passage of such an act as unwise, Impolitic and unnecessary, were adopted, and as the Law was deemed retrospective in its operation and violative Existing contracts, our immediate representatives Were requested to use their best endeavors to secure its repeal. An odious measure, adopted by the same Legislature, Repealing a law of fifty years' standing, requiring Debts, to give security and pay 12 per cent. interest, was Condemned as oppressive and unjust to the debtor class. The "Stay Law" was not repealed, but was soon after Declared unconstitutional by the State Courts.

         The attention of the Chamber was early in March directed To alleged discriminations against the trade of Memphis, practiced by the managers of the Mobile and Ohio Railroad. It was charged that an unfair policy was Pursued, tending to injure the trade of this city, and in Favor of Mobile, through a system of tariff charges which Were much higher on the northern end of the road, then Terminating in Corinth, than on the southern or Mobile End. A committee was appointed to inquire into the matter, And after a lengthy, patient, and impartial investigation, reported that the charges were in great part sustained. The subsequent action of the officers of the road has, we are pleased to State, been far less objectionable to Memphis people and Memphis interests.

         Among other subjects considered at the July meeting Was that of the proper course to be adopted with reference to the disposition of the coming Cotton and Tobacco crops in view of the blockade and attending circumstances. Resolutions favoring the purchase of the crops referred to by the Government, to be paid for in Treasury notes or drafts, which notes or drafts, it was further recommended, be made a legal currency in the Confederate States, were presented by a committee of the Chamber and unanimously adopted. The resolutions set forth the advantages of such a course, both to the Government and the people-- that the latter would then have a good, sound, and sufficient currency, equal, if not better, than the present bank note system--that the productive energies of the different States will be stimulated, and the Government enabled to borrow from the agricultural resources of her own people a sufficient amount of money to carry on the war; and at the same time bind all her citizens, by interests both patriotic and pecuniary, to uphold her indi nationality.

         Many other subject of minor importance have engaged The attention of the Association at various times throughout The year, but space forbids reference to them in this Report.

ESTIMATES OF THE TRADE OF MEMPHIS.

         The aggregates presented in the annexed table indicates The value of the Imports of Leading Articles into the city during the past year, and in connection with the value of Manufactured Articles produces in the city during the same period, furnish a pretty fair indication of the immense proportions which the annual trade of Memphis has assumed. It will be readily understood, that even with the records before us, it is a matter of extreme difficulty to obtain all the value of the thousand different branches of trade which go to make up a great commercial center like Memphis. We have, however, endeavored, in presenting the annexed recapitulation, to approximate as nearly the true value as possible, and with this view have consulted prominent dealers in each specific branch of trade. We feel safe in stating that in no instance has an over-estimate been made, while in many instances an increase might with propriety have been allowed. It is offered, therefore, as closely approximating correctness as regards all the articles named, and in this view may be considered as reliable basis for estimating the trade of the city in all its varied departments:

        

Amount and Value of Imports--Leading Articles-- for past year.

ARTICLES. Quantity. Value.
Apples . . . . .barrels 20,629 $30,943
Alcohol. . . . . barrels 840 16,800
Agricultural Implements . . . . .No. 11,030 55 150
Ale and Beer . . . . .packages 20 179 110,984
Bagging . . . . .pieces 18 623 372,460
Beans. . . . . barrels 2,868 14 340
Boots and shoes. . . . . packages 29, 179 110,984
Butter. . . . . packages 4,101 123,030
Beef. . . . . barrels 4,331 56,242
Bacon. . . . . Casks 10,599 1,477,870
". . . . . tierces 5,160 232,200
Cotton. . . . . bales 369,633 18,481,650
Corn. . . . . bushels 1,137546 682 527
Cotton Seed. . . . . sacks 175,308 70,124
Cotton Gins. . . . . No. 198 42 000
" Yarns. . . . . bales 972 34,020
Cattle. . . . . No. 7 322 219 660
Crockery. . . . . hogsheads and crates 565 34,000
Clover Seed. . . . . barrels 677 16,900
Cement and Plaster. . . . . barrels 13 266 40 000
Cheese. . . . . boxes 18,448 73,800
Coal. . . . . bushels 1,065 725 639,400
Coffee. . . . . sacks 30 458 823,000
Dry-Goods. . . . . packages 25,064 4,012 800
Dried Fruit. . . . . sacks 9,064 20,000
". . . . . barrels 554 2,400
Drugs. . . . . packages 4,826 305,000
Eggs. . . . . boxes 1,591 7,500
". . . . . barrels 6,737 101 000
Furs. . . . . packages 2,675 50,000
Fish. . . . . packages 15,080 60 000
Furniture. . . . . packages 29,984 375 000
Gunnies. . . . . bales 784 23 500
Gunny Cloth. . . . . bales 1,625 49,000
Glass. . . . . boxes 8,345 25,000
Glassware. . . . . packages 6,631 40,000
Hay. . . . . bales 32,300 150 000
Carried Forward. . . . .  29,987,812


Page 6

        

Table of Imports Continued.

ARTICLES. Quantity. Value.
Brought forward. . . . . . . . . . 29,987,812
Hides. . . . . No. 60,860 152,000
Hogs. . . . . No. 5,552 67,000
Hats. . . . . cases 1,091 98,000
Horses. . . . . No 1,615 400,000
Hardware. . . . . packages 10,611 2,122,200
Iron. . . . . tons 2,827 234,000
Ice. . . . . tons 19,654 395,000
Lead. . . . . barrels 6,675 36,800
". . . . . kegs 3,040 76,000
Leather. . . . . bundles and boxes 4,331 142,900
Lard. . . . . kegs 8,400 57,000
". . . . . barrels 2,087 56,500
". . . . .tierces 1,136 38,000
Lime. . . . .barrels 61,426 107,495
Lemons. . . . . boxes 1,479 9,000
Liquors. . . . . packages 11,933 119,000
Lumber. . . . .feet 16,527 670 320,000
Molasses. . . . .barrels 19,094 248,500
Nails. . . . .kegs 20 828 90,000
Oats. . . . .sacks 121,385 55,600
Onions. . . . .sacks 12,385 15,200
". . . . .barrels 1,177 3,000
Oakum. . . . .bales 290 1,200
Oranges. . . . .boxes 3,986 16,000
Oil. . . . .barrels 3,107 90,000
Pork. . . . .barrels, 21,953 483,000
". . . . .casks 2,232 200,880
". . . . .pouods bulk 1,325,635 122 800
Potatoes. . . . .sacks 29,395 31 500
". . . . . barrels 25,903 55,500
Powder. . . . .kegs 4,883 29,500
Rice. . . . .tierces 3,493 110,000
Rope. . . . .coils 20,720 249,500
Sugar. . . . .barrels 6,214 131,000
". . . . .hogsheads 9,688 767,000
Salt. . . . .sacks 86,539 130,000
Seed, Grass. . . . .sacks 1,686 6,800
Stoves. . . . . No. 2,434 73,000
Sheep. . . . .No. 3,236 11,500
Shot. . . . .bags 7,591 18,000
Soap. . . . .boxes 8,737 30 600
Tobacco. . . . .hogsheads 2,926 292,600
". . . . . boxes 12,505 250,100
". . . . . packages 794 20,000
Tea. . . . .packages 794 20,000
Tar. . . . .barrels 1,056 6,000
Turpentine. . . . .barrels 854 20,500
Wheat. . . . .bushels 140,054 134,600
Whisky. . . . .barrels 31,471 378,600
Wool. . . . .bales 1,880 47,500
White Lead. . . . .kegs 3,089 9,300
Wine. . . . .barrels 364 29,120
". . . . .casks 355 12,400
". . . . .boxes 4,204 21,000
". . . . .baskets 1,452 21,780
Grand Total. . . . . . . . . . $38,787,687

         Thus it will be perceived that the value of the year's receipts of loading articles into Memphis is approximately estimated at say Thirty-nine Millions of Dollars. To this must be added the value of manufactured articles produced, say $3,000,000 as also the value of the many articles of receipt which are necessarily omitted from this summary--such for instance as Machinery, Books, Stationary, Gold and Silver Ware, Watches, Jewelry, Carriages, Musical Instruments, and a score of other unenumerated articles, from the fact that their quantities and value could not be ascertained. If we estimate these at $9,700,000, or about one-fourth of the enumerated articles, we have a grand total of $51,750,000, as an approximate estimate of the general trade of the city of Memphis during the past year.

MONETARY AND FINANCIAL.

        In our last annual statement of facts and figures, as disclosed by the monetary and financial operations of the year, we gave the records of a season of unexampled prosperity. The country had fully recovered from the disastrous effects of the great financial panic of 1857, and our young city had made vigorous and gigantic strides in her march to greatness and renown. The Exchange dealing of our bankers showed an aggregate for the year of over seventy-three millions of dollars. The year commencing on the 1st of September, 1860, opened brightly. Every material interest of our city was in the highest degree prosperous; and the business transactions of that month and the succeeding month of October were on a scale of magnitude and grandeur, which betokened a future of greater results than had ever been realized in our previous history. Money was in good supply. Exchanges on all points easy, and at the lowest rates of premium--being a par on New York and half per cent. premium on New Orleans. The cotton crop came forward early, the prices being highly remunerative. Holders were willing to meet the market, and bills drawn against shipments were readily negotiated up to the close of October.

         As the Presidential election approached, a disposition was manifested to hold off, until the result should be known. Transactions were entered into with less confidence, and more scrutiny was given to the drawers and drawees of bills, than had been the case heretofore. With the election of Abraham Lincoln on the 6th of November, came disaster and trouble. The terrible effects of the triumph of the Abolition candidate were immediately felt. The life-blood of commercial transactions--confidence-- was gone. The acceptances of the largest and most wealthy houses in New Orleans became immediately unsalable at any price, and distrust, suspicion, and loss of credit ruled the hour. A panic took possession of the people; deposits were hurriedly called for. Our banks were depleted of their coin, and so rapidly did one trouble tread upon the heels of another, that, on the 25th day of November, the banks of this State suspended specie payments. This measure was adopted in this city, not so much from necessity as in obedience to the earnest demands of the commercial and business community. The suspension did not, however, produce immediately the good effects which were looked for by those who urged it. For a time, the great staple was unsalable; the price declined to eight cents per pound, and he was a bold man who dared to take a bill based upon a shipment to any house, however high its previous standing. Many of the largest commission houses in New Orleans suspended before the end of November, and it is believed that over three hundred thousand dollars of the banking capital of our city was involved in these suspensions. As time wore on, and the necessities of commerce pressed upon the people, coupled with the conviction that the new Administration could not come into power for four months to come, small sales of cotton were made, the price of the staple gradually recovered, and during the balance of the season, or up to the 1st of April, the usual amount of business was done, and, upon the whole, at satisfactory prices to all concerned. With the month of April, came the war proclamation of the Lincoln Government. Then quickly


Page 7

followed the flight of those who had resided among us, having Northern connections and proclivities.

         War, with all its attendant evils, is now upon us. All commercial intercourse with our enemy has ceased, and it becomes us to look our troubles square in the face, and to put forth all our energies to sustain our Government and carry it triumphantly through the struggles in which we are now engaged. The operations of our Government, while the war continues, must, from the nature of the se, have a controlling influence upon the commercial and business transactions of the country. The wise and statesmanlike policy has been adopted, of not selling a bale of cotton to any person or nation outside of the Southern Confederacy, until the independence of the Confederate States is acknowledged by the nation or people wishing to trade with us. Whether the policy which the Government is supposed to favor and entertain, of buying all the cotton, tobacco, etc., and issuing their Treasury notes in payment for the same, is what the exigencies of the country at this moment demand, cannot perhaps be satisfactorily demonstrated short of the test of experiment and trial. For the Government to become a factor upon a magnificent scale, with her hundreds of brokers and agents, interfering to a great extent with the regular pursuits of our commission merchants, would seem to be liable to many objections; but while our ports are closed against the export of our products, what can be done to praise the money with which to carry on the war, and at the same time best serve the wants and interests of the people? This is the question which presents itself for solution. In peaceful times, the basis of our foreign commerce is Cotton. This great Southern staple has for years furnished our Northern enemies the foundation of four-fifths of all their vast Exchange operations. So dependant have our Southern cities been upon the market of Wall Street that the price of our cotton, tobacco, etc., has been elevated or depressed, according to the ability of New York to take exchange on Europe. Let us now hope that this state of serfdom and vassalage is abolished forever, and that in the future our own means and resources shall be entirely and fully adequate to our necessities. When the fight is over and peace restored, we shall readily find new customers and new sources for the supply of our wants. Until that time arrives, we must depend entirely upon ourselves, and make good use of the means within our reach. In order to make our great staples available to us in time of war, and furnish a safe and always reliable foundation for the redemption of issues based upon them, it is proposed that the Government purchase and store at convenient points, distant from the seaboard, sufficient of the products of the Confederate States to meet the yearly expenses of the war--say one hundred and fifty millions of dollars--one-half this amount to be paid in Treasury notes, without interest; the other half to be paid in ten year Bonds, bearing eight per cent. interest. The mere possession of the cotton, etc., would be of no immediate advantage to the Government, nor would it enable her to discharge her obligations contracted in carrying on the war; but it is argued that by putting afloat seventy-five millions in Treasury notes, thus furnishing a currency which would be uniform in value throughout the Confederacy, it would make money plenty, of a kind which would be gladly received by all our people, and enable them to take in turn the Government bonds or loan as fast as the money might be required. It is presumed that the business of the Confederate States could not keep in circulation a larger amount than seventy-five million dollars in Treasury notes; and if the Treasury Department should have the power to reissue said notes, it would not be necessary to increase the amount, even should the war continue five years. When our ports shall be opened, and the cotton, etc. sent to market, the Government would immediately have the means of redeeming her Treasury notes in coin, or, what would be as good, in exchange on Europe. Evidently the expenses of the war must be met, by loans, by direct taxes, or by both. The issue of seventy-five millions of dollars in Treasury notes, without interest--as every dollar of interest would be that much loss to the Government, and besides would be an inducement to board them, and keep them from circulation--would enable the people to pay the taxes levied by the Government, and besides would have the effect to restrain an over issue of bank notes, which are now by their abundance depreciated fifteen per cent. The Confederate Treasury Notes would certainly rest upon a sure foundation, would have universal circulation within the Southern States, and would be every way acceptable to the people. The foregoing plan seems to meet with general favor among our bankers and capitalists, and is believed to be eminently worthy of experiment.

OUR RAILROADS.

         MEMPHIS AND CHARLESTON RAILROAD.--This road was originally projected as a great commercial artery between the Atlantic ocean and the Mississippi river, but in the present disrupted state of the country it has proven to be the strong arm of military defense, serving not only to unite the Southern Confederacy with iron bonds, but enabling the Government to unite its forces at any point desired, either on the Atlantic coast or in the Mississippi valley. As will be seen from tables and statements herewith presented, the road has increased its receipts during the past twelve months $206,025 93, or 12 1-2 per cent. Under the circumstances surrounding the country, this is most extraordinary. Its present enormous receipts of $1,841,122 60, on a capital cost of $7,000,000, is ample evidence that the stockholders made a wise investment; and the increase of the stock, upon its completion, of 60 per cent. upon what each stockholder actually paid in, together with the payment of 8 per cent. cash dividends, annually, shows that it is one of the paying institutions of the country, either in peace or war--whether in the old "Union" or in the Southern Confederacy. The stockholders have reason to congratulate themselves upon the prosperous condition of this great work--the fine condition of the road's machinery, and the quiet, systematic order that characterises its management. It is purely a great Southern enterprise, built by Southern capital and Southern men, and managed still by the same parties who built it, never having materially changed its organization-- still retaining its old Board of Directors and officers, or others who have been promoted from the ranks of their operatives.


Page 8

        

Comparative Statement of Receipts, Memphis and Charleston
Railroad, for past three years.

RECEIPTS 1859. 1860. 1861.
From Passengers $751,923,01 $975,259,33 $1,022,595,48
" Freights. . . . . 509,991,66 582,553,26 729,875,93
" Mails. . . . . 55,175,00 55,176,00 54,064,59
"Ex. & rent 13,722,73 22,089,08 34,576,61
Total. . . . . $1,330,812,40 $1,635,096,67 $1,841,122,60

         MEMPHIS AND OHIO RAILROAD.--This road forms an important link in the chain of railroads connecting Louisville, Memphis, and New Orleans, extending from Memphis to Paris, Tennessee, a distance of 130 miles. The road was completed 57 miles to Brownsville, in 1855; to Humboldt, 82 miles, in April, 1859, and to Paris, the northern terminus, May 11, 1860. In consequence of the Clarksville road not having been completed, direct communication was not made with Louisville until April 15, 1861, on which day the first through train left Memphis, and arrived in Louisville in twenty hours. The time has since been reduced to eighteen hours, and on the completion of the Tennessee river bridge, we are assured it will be still further reduced. The distance from Memphis to Louisville is--Memphis and Ohio Road, 130 miles; Memphis, Clarksville and Louisville Road, 83 miles, and Louisville and Nashville Road, 167 miles--total 380 miles. The short time that has elapsed since the opening of this route, and the partial prostration of trade in consequence of the war, precludes the formation of a correct estimate of the immense business that will be transacted by this road when peace shall again be restored. For the present we can only refer to the movements of freight over the road, as indicated by the statements elsewhere contained in this report. Each year's earnings of the road have evinced a decided increase over the preceding year. In 1860 the receipts exhibited an increase over 1859 of 67 per cent; and in 1861 over 1860 of 20 per cent., of which $59,061 was from passengers, $29,831 from freights, and $2,691 from mails--total increase $91,585. The total receipts of the past year embraced $362,595 33; operating expenses same time, $190,754 78; leaving as nett earnings, $171,840 55. The road, as we are informed, has cost about $3,300,000, including buildings and equipments. The financial condition of the road may be briefly stated: Tennessee bonds, maturing in 1895, '96, '97, '98, and '99, $1,493,000; Company 6 per cent. bonds, due in 1866, $97,000; Company income bonds, 10 per cent. due in 1870, $432,000--total funded debt, $2,022,00); floating debt, $278,000--total liabilities, $2,300,000. It will thus be seen that the cost of building and equipping the road exceeds the total liabilities of the Company by $1 000,000. Annexed we give a

        

Comparative Statement of Receipts, Memphis and Ohio
Railroad, for past three years.

RECEIPTS 1859. 1860. 1861.
From Passengers. . . . . $71,574,65 $130,285,90 $189,347,55
From Freight. . . . . 76,976,85 136,816,84 166,647,78
From Mail. . . . . 1,273,40 3,908,58 6,600,00
From Express. . . . . 160,40 . . . . . . . . . .
Total. . . . . $149,985,30 $271,010,32 $362,595,33

        MISSISSIPPI AND TENNESSEE RAILROAD.--The completion of this important artery of commerce and travel opens up direct railroad communication with Grenada, Canton, Jackson and New Orleans, and reduces the time between Memphis and the latter point to twenty three hours. Twenty miles of the road on the southern end, from Oakland to Granada, were completed on the 31 of July, and the first through train left this city on the following day. The future prospects of the road are certainly of the most flattering character. Passing through one of the richest Cotton-growing regions of the South, and forming, as it does, an important part of the great Northern and Southern line of travel, its future operations can scarcely be otherwise than profitable to the public and remunerative to stockholders and others interested. The road is 99 miles in length, and is, for the most part, well built. There are thirteen "Howe Truss" bridges, and seven wrought iron, in spans of 25 and 30 feet, resting on solid and substantial approaches. The pressure of the times has prevented the erection of permanent depot buildings and machine shops at Memphis, which was wisely deferred until the track should be completed; yet this company does all its own repairs in temporary shops, attached to which is a car manufactory, which is turning out all the cars required by the road--some of them the finest to be found in the country. The business of the road during the past year, circumstances considered, has been excellent, the amount of freight shipped from this city especially showing a marked increase. The earnings of the road, in its various departments, will be seen from the following:

        

Comparative Statement of Receipts, Mississippi and Tennessee
Railroad, for past three years.

RECEIPTS 1859. 1860. 1861.
From Passengers. . . . . $66,636,41 $74,528,06 $78,055,62
" Freight. . . . . 104,704,76 140,525,79 134,650,60
" Mail. . . . . 747,33 1,547,33 5,737,50
Exp's, rents, etc 4,425,00 4,425,00 1,800,02
Total. . . . . $176,513,50 $221,026,18 $220,333,74

        MEMPHIS AND LITTLE ROCK RAILROAD.--The prospects of this Road are of a very flattering and gratifying character. Several months since the affairs of the Company passed into the hands of a new administration, under whose auspices the work of completion is being prosecuted with vigor. From official sources we learn that track-laying is progressing on both ends, that the grading is completed from Duvall's Bluff, on White river, to Little Rock, and some 18 miles of track laid down since April last, with the prospect of completion by the 1st November. Prior to this date it is expected that the bridge crossing the St. Francis will be completed, when we shall be in direct and uninterrupted communication with Little Rock. The heaviest portion of the grading of the intervening space of forty-five miles between Madison and Duvall's Bluff, has been performed; the iron for the entire road purchased, and sufficient amount delivered to complete the road from White river to Little Rock, as well as some fifteen miles on the secoond or middle division, leaving but thirty miles of iron for future delivery.


Page 9

        

Comparative Statement of Receipts, Memphis and Little Rock Railroad, for past three years:

RECEIPTS 1859.* 1860. 1861.
From Passengers. . . . . $4,609,35 $18,000,48 $22,616 80
Freights. . . . . 1,124,21 9,622,18 13,132,89
Mail. . . . . 1,125,50 4,798,34 5,600,00
Express. . . . . . . . . . 107,40 486,49
Total . . . . . $6,858,66 $32,528,40 $41,836,18


*Embracing a period of three months, during which the road was in operation.

FREIGHTS.

        RECEIPTS FOR THE YEAR.--3,784 bales Cotton; 22 bales Cotton; 22 bags Corn; 1328 head Cattle; 300 bags Cotton Seed, and Sundries.

         SHIPMENTS FOR THE YEAR.--3,784 bales Apples; 145 Agricultural Implements; 285 pieces Bagging; 158; 158 cases Boots and Shoes, 432 barrels Beef; 66 casks 72 tierces Bacon; 425 bags Corn; 925 barrels Cement; 266 boxes Cheese; 341 sacks Coffee; 1,158 packages Dry Goods; 99 do. Drugs; 1360 barrels Flour; 210 bales Hay; 179 kegs Lard; 346 barrels Lima; 283 do. Molasses; 329 kegs Nails; 212 bags Oats; 116 barrels Pork; 471 sacks 543 barrels Potatoes; 462 coils Rope; 310 barrels 13 hogsheads Sugar; 1500 sacks Salt; 175 boxes Tobacco; 661 barrels Whisky.

MANUFACTURES

         From the census returns of 1860, taken under the auspices of the United States Government, we collate the annexed table, showing the amount of capital at that time invested in manufacturing enterprises within the city limits, the value of raw material annually consumed and the moneyed value of productions:

        
ARTICLES. Amt. of Capital Invested. Val. Raw Material Consumed Val. Profits from Same.
Doors, Sash, Blinds, Frames and Flooring. . . . . $158,000 $268,000 $635,000
S. eng., Cars & Wh'ls, Iron Fts, S.B. & Mis. C. . . . . 367,000 259,000 541,000
Flour and Corn Meal. . . . . 100 000 237,000 300,000
Brick (estimated at 5,000,000). . . . . 20,000 7,500 300,000
Carriages and Buggies. . . . .75,500 33,500 143,101
Tin Ware, & Roofing, Gut'ring, Sh't Iron Wk. 33,000 81,600 142,000
Lumber (City Saw Mills) . . . . . 87,000 68,690 124,000
Furniture (Staple Articles) . . . . . 125,000 32,000 100,000
Wagons, Carts and Drays . . . . . 151,000 32,000 90,000
Soap, Lard Oil and Candles . . . . . 32,000 45 000 38,000
Boots and Shoes . . . . . 5,000 30,000 78,000
Gas (15 000,000 feet) . . . . . 200,000 20,520 63,800
Cotton Seed Oil . . . . . 102,000 30,600 61,060
Saddlery and Harness . . . . . 9,000 28,500 60,100
French Burr and Saw Mills . . . . . 28,000 15,000 59,000
Sheet Iron, Copper and Brass . . . . . 12,000 20,000 42,000
Boilers . . . . . 13,000 8,500 36,000
Agricultural and Ornamental Iron Work . . . . . 7,000 17,900 29,500
Lath . . . . . 8,000 13,500 27,250
Plantation Machinery . . . . . 10,000 10,000 20,000
Mineral Water . . . . . 5,250 4,960 19,900
Hats and Caps . . . . . 3,500 4,700 10,500
Total . . . . . $1,851,250 $1,269,224 $3,019,741

        It should be borne in mind that these facts wereg athered during a period of general prosperity, and before any interest had felt the blighting influence of war. We have, therefore, at the expense of considerable trouble and labor, examined into the relative increase or decrease of business in the various departments above named, with the view of ascertaining to what extent the manufacturing classes have been affected by the extraordinary occurrences of the past year, and present the following as the result of our investigations: In the manufacture of doors, sash, blinds, etc., we find a decrease of from 45 to 50 per cent., in steam engines, cars, fronts and miscellaneous castings; a decrease of about 20 per cent.; in brick, of fully 50 per cent.; carriages and buggies, 30 per cent.; tin ware, roofing, boilers, agricultural and ornamental iron works, wagons and drays, lath, furniture, etc., a decrease of from 10 to 25 per cent.; while in flour and corn meal, cotton seed oil, soap, lard-oil and candles, saddlery, plantation machinery, tests, caps, and several articles of minor importance, there has been an increase varying from 20 to 60 per cent. Added to this, the peculiar circumstances of the times have given rise to the manufacture in our city of military goods and implements of war, on a most gigantic scale, and the increase in the value of productions thus created, will go far toward counterbalancing the loss sustained in otter departments, if indeed it does not exceed it. From official sources, we learn that during the past two or three months from twelve to fifteen hundred persons, male and female, have been actively engaged in the production of clothing, camp equippage, cartridges, percussion caps, knapsacks, cavalry equipments, etc., to say nothing of the very considerable force employed at the various foundries and machine shops in turning out field pieces of various descriptions, shot and shell, swords, knives, and warlike implements generally. The quantities and values of the articles thus produced cannot at this time, from obvious reasons, be stated, but, with a knowledge of the force thus employed, the reader will be able to draw his own conclusions. The facilities for manufacturing flour have been largely increased, and during the last two months the production has averaged 4,000 barrels per week--an amount never before equalled in any Southern city, but which may be considerably increased, should future circumstances seem to require it.

THE DRY GOODS TRADE.

         In glancing at the year's operations in this important branch of trade, we find a healthful and gratifying increase of business in both the wholesale and retail departments. It is in the wholesale department, however, in which this increase is mostly observable, and to that we desire more especially to direct attention. The commanding influence exerted by the jobbing trade in building up and establishing great commercial centres, is known and acknowledged by all, and hence we find that in our own city no one cause has tended more to the extension of our trade to remote regions, hitherto looking to other markets for supplies, the formation of now and profitable business connections, and the attracting of purchasers in the various walks of commerce, to this market, than our several wholesale dry goods and other jobbing houses. Although we must expect that under the new order of things the channels of trade will be more


Page 10

or less interrupted, yet the superior inducements which Memphis will always be able to present, will undoubtedly enable her not only to retain all her present immense trade, but to greatly extend it in the future. Country dealers have found it greatly to their advantage to purchase here, in preference to going East or North, and for various reasons,--among which may be mentioned the fact that he can purchase here precisely what his wants may require, and no more; by purchasing here he can do so oftener, and thus secure a quicker and more frequent return of investment; he pays our merchants in funds current in the section from which he may come, thereby saving the very considerable item of exchange; to say nothing of the saving in time and traveling expenses incident to a more lengthened journey, insurance, freights, interest on money, etc. In addition to this he finds our merchants supplied with stock selected with especial reference to his wants, and has no difficulty in making selections. Should his bill call for Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps, Clothing, Hardware, Crockery, Groceries,--in fact, any of the staple articles of merchandise--he finds jobbing establishments from which he can as readily satisfy his wants as in the line of Dry Goods, and at prices amply repaying investment. With these and other advantages it will be seen that the increase in trade referred to is simply the result of superior inducements held out by our merchants, who find tha the vim and energy displayed in securing it is being well repaid. Three years ago our city contained but one jobbing Dry Goods house, and orders were rarely filled from remote or distant regions. Now we find four of those establishments, transacting an immense business, paving the way for others in the same line, as also in every other department, and extending our trade to Texas, Southern and Western Arkansas, Central and Southern Mississippi, throughout Alabama, into Georgia, East Tennessee and some sections of Virginia, Southern Missouri and the Southern portion of Kentucky.

         No apprehensions need be entertained as to fall supplies. The energy and enterprise of our merchants is ample assurance that they will be secured--entire lines of goods will be kept as herotofore,--extensive wants catered to and supplied, and on terms as favorable as can be offered in any city of the country. Southern manufacturers, we are pleased to state, are already supplying a vast proportion of the goods sold in this market, and arrangements will ere long be completed for direct importations.

         The first-class facilities offered in this city for the manufacture Of certain lines of clothing, have induced many of our jobbing houses to enter largely into the business, and the demand for all staple articles in the departments referred to, especially in this section, will hereafter be supplied from home manufacture.

         The total receipts of Dry Goods into the city during the year (exclusive of deliveries by Adams Express, the amount of which cannot be ascertained) we find to be 25,064 packages.

THE COTTON TRADE.

         The market for the past year opened on the 1st of September with a stock on hand of 1,709 bales, against 1,184 bales at the same date in 1859--60, and 2,671 bales in 1858--59. The receipt of new crop, to that date, comprised 275 bales, against 56 bales in 1859-60, and 25 bales in 1858-59. The first bale of the crop, now under review, reached the city on the 2d of August, against the 17th of August in 1859, and the 24th of August in the preceding year. It was from Bolivar county, Miss., classed Good Middling, and sold immediately on arrival at 12 1/2c. per lb. The first bale from Arkansas was received on the 8th of August--from Crittenden county--and the first from Tennessee--Fayette county--on the l0th following.

         The average quality of the year's receipts has been much better than usual, the receipts up to the 1st of January being especially remarkable for uniform cleanliness and freedom from dust and sand, The staple, however, was perhaps a shade less desirable than the preceding crop, yet as a whole the yield was more acceptable than ever before in the history of the cotton culture of the country, and as a sequence, commanded more remunerative prices--the political disturbances of the times to the contrary notwithstanding--than were ever before realized by the planting community. For these auspicious results we are in great measure indebted to the unusually favorable character of the eather during the early part of the season, by which the successful gathering of the crop was greatly facilitated. Owing to the early maturing of the crop, picking commenced fully a fortnight earlier than usual, say about the middle of August, and with dry and salubrious weather, with but slight exceptions, from that date until the early part of January, planters had ample opportunity for securing their entire crops in the best possible condition. At the opening of the market, as above, prospects for the coming crop were in the main favorable, but the severe drouth of the two preceding months having materially hsHetied ttic estimated pre viously indulged in, of a yield exceeding the memorable one of 1859-60, holders were firm in their views and confident that full prices would be maintained. The steadily increasing wants of the human family, and the variety of new purposes for which Cotton and Cotton fabrics were required, indicated that a still larger amount would be wanted for consumption, and tended still further to assure dealers that the short crop then anticipated would meet a steady demand and remunerative prices. The full realization of these expectations proved them to have been well founded, for while the market during the year has experienced many and material fluctuations, an accurate comparison shows the average price paid for the staple to have been above that of any preceding year since 1850.

         Before proceeding to a detailed review of the course of the market, it is proper to observe, that one of the most gratifying features in the course of the year's business has been the almost total absence in this market of anything like false or mixed packed bales of Cotton. The exceptions to this rule have been rare indeed, and the remark has been common among factors and brokors, that the staple has seldom reached this city in better condition, or exhibiting greater care on the part of planters in picking, handling and packing. It was thus that the high reputation of Memphis Cottons was first established, and it is thus only that it can be maintained.

         At the opening of the season a fair demand was expressed, especially for good and clean Cottons, of the new crop, all offerings of which were taken at 10 1/4 @ 10 1/2c. for Middling. The market moved along through the month without special change, and prices in the meantime gradually


Page 11

stiffening. As the mouth progressed, the disastrous effects of the drouth were more apparent, find in addition to this, the boll-worm and fly were beginning to seriously affect the plant along the bottom lands of Mississippi and Arkansas. The receipts of the month were liberal, comprising 24,210 bales, against 15,677 in 1859. . . . . During the early part of October, operations were restricted by the stringent state of the money market, and the very great difficulty experienced in negotiating exchange, and prices ruled steady and unchanged. About the 20th, however, with a succession of favorable advices to hand from all the leading foreign and domestic markets, together with an easier tone in the money market, where sales of exchange, drawn against shipments, were more readily effected, now life and animation was infused into the trade, and the month closed with a buoyant market at an advance of 1/4 @ 1/2c. on all grades,--the sales of the closing week embracing fully 21,000 bales. Month's receipts, 76,755 bales, against 71,042 bales in 1859. . . . . The brisk speculative and manufacturing demand, observable at the close of October, continued during the first few days of November, the sales on the 2d embracing nearly 5000 bales, but as the day of the Presidential election approached, political excitement ran high, and commercial affairs were for the moment neglected. A decline of 1/4 @ 1/2c.was thus occasioned, from which the market failed to rally until the middle of February, and having, in the meantime, sank to 8c. for Middling. The receipts of November summed up 73,776 bales against 99,653 bales for the preceding year. The demand during the month was chiefly manufacturing--speculators, in view of the unsatisfactory condition of political affairs, very generally abstaining from operations. The sales were consequently limited to 21,000 bales. . . . . During the early part of the month of December, political affairs grew daily more complicated and embarrassing to financial matters and the regular course of exchange, and the Cotton market was very much depressed, Middling on the 7th being dull at 8c.--the lowest point of the season. Subsequently, how ever, political affairs began to wear a more cheerful aspect, the news from Europe became more encouraging, financial matters experienced some improvement, and by the 24th the market had returned to its wonted activity, and prices improved fully 2 1/4c. per lb. This improvement was maintained until the close of the month, when we quoted Middling at 10 @ 10 1/4c. Receipts fell off to 44,879 bales, against 55,563 in December 1859. . . . . A continuance. of favorable Liverpool advices, added to growing ease in financial circles, and more confidence among speculators as to the future stability of prices, early in January resulted in a further advance, placing quotations at the highest point of the season--the competition in the market, in the meantime, having been lively, and embracing buyers not only for Northern and Southern, but for di rect Liverpool and Manchester account. The aggregate business of the month was the largest of the season, embracing 76,000 bales, the sales on the three closing days summing up 16,890 bales. Receipts also the heaviest of the season--87,753 bales, against 42,586 in January '59. . . . . . During February a good degree of animation prevailed in the market, and with a good attendance of Northern, European, and Southern buyers, the demand was active, and prices, while experiencing no change, ruled steady throughout, and closed firm. Month's receipts 37,755 bales; in 1859, 64,163 bales. . . . . March opened with a lively competition among buyers, caused by the favorable tenor of European advices, evincing, as they did, that our trans-Atlantic customers were becoming seriously alarmed as to future supplies; by the threatenng attitude of American affairs, and were disposed to purchase freely and at full prices. Hence Middlings, which on the 1st were held at 10 1/4 @ 10 1/2c., steadily advanced to 11c., then to 11 1/2c. and finally, on the 26th of the month to 12c. per lb., at which there was much firmness and great activity. Buyers for Northern manufacturing account also evinced more disposition to operate, and what with these and the free purchases of New Orleans and Liverpool parties, the stock on sale was rapidly reduced from 40,060 bales, on the 1st, to less than 5000 on the 31st, the receipts in the meantime having also comprised 14,772 bales. . . . . The upward tendency in prices, above referred to, continued until the close of the first week in April, by which time a further improvement of 1/2c.was established, placing Middling at the extraordinary figure of 12 1/2c. At this time stocks had become so reduced, and the prospect for future receipts so unfavorable, that the majority of buyers withdrew from the market, and the Cotton season, proper, virtually closed. A glance at the annexed schedule of prices will show the slight changes in prices that may have occurred from that date to the present, during the greater part of which time operations have been mostly confined to orders from interior Southern manufacturers--prices meanwhile being regulated solely by the relative necessities of buyers and sellers.

        

Comparative Statement of the Monthly Receipts of Cotton
At Memphis during the past three years.

MONTHS. 1858--1859 1859--1860 1860--1861
September. . . . . 10,000 15,677 24,210
October. . . . . 57,783 71,642 76,755
November. . . . . 71,808 91,653 73,776
December. . . . . 69,989 55,653 44,879
January. . . . . 51,530 42,586 87,753
February. . . . . 30,994 64,163 37,755
March. . . . . 18,874 36,292 14,772
April. . . . . 9,808 10,060 6,707
May. . . . . 2,978 7,374 1,378
June. . . . . 395 1,159 599
July. . . . . 477 872 389
August. . . . . 366 1,350 650
Total. . . . . 325,480 398,791 369,653

        

Comparative Statement of Shipments of Cotton Northward,
From Memphis, (by river) for the past ten years.

YEAR. AMOUNT.
1851--52. . . . . 16,706
1852--53 22,521
1853--54 23,156
1854--55 16,427
1855--56 34,306
1856--57 34,184
1857--58 28,800
1858--59 84,139
1859--60 128,329
1860--61 167,696

        

Comparative Statement of Cotton Shipments from Memphis
During the past three years.

DESTINATION. 1858--59 1860--60 1860--61
New Orleans. . . . . 241,546 263,589 184,366
Ohio River. . . . . 59,827 111,144 153,894
St. Louis. . . . . 23,724 16,769 13,802
European & Northern Points . . . . . 160 14,989
Interior Points. . . . . . . . . . 256 2,806
Total. . . . . 325,107 391,918 369,857


Page 12

        

TABLE.--Showing the Weekly Prices of Cotton during the
year.

DATE. Ordinary to Good Ordinary. Low Mid. to Middling. Strict Mid to Good Mid. Mid. Fair to Fair.
Sept. (old) 7 5 1/2 @ 7 8 @ 10 10 1/2 @ nominal.
" " 14 5 1/2 7 8 10 10 1/2 . . . . .
" (new) 21 nom. 8 1/4 10 1/4 10 1/2 11 1/4 11 3/8
" 28 . . . . . 9 1/4 10 1/4 10 1/2 11 1/4 11 3/8
Oct. 5 . . . . . 9 1/4 10 1/4 10 1/2 11 1/4 11 3/8 12
" 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 19 . . . . . 10 1/2 10 3/4 11 1/2 11 3/4 12 1/2
" 26 . . . . . 9 1/2 10 3/4 11 12 1/2
Nov.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 9 nom. nom. nom. nom.
" 16 . . . . . 9 1/2 10 1/2 10 3/4 11 1/8 11 1/2 12
" 23 . . . . . 8 9 1/2 9 3/4 10 1/2 nom.
" 30 nom. Nom. 10 1/4 nom.
Dec. 7 . . . . . 7 8 1/2 9 9 3/4 10 1/4 11
" 14 . . . . . 7 1/2 8 1/2 9 9 3/4 10 1/4 11
" 21 . . . . . 8 8 1/2 9 3/4 10 1/2 10 3/4
" 28 7 8 1/2 9 10 1/4 10 1/2 113/4 11 1/2 12 1/2
Jan. 4 7 1/2 9 1/2 10 11 11 1/4 12 12 1/4
"11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
"18 7 8 1/2 9 1/2 10 1/2 10 3/4 11 1/2 11 3/4
" 25 . . . . . 9 10 1/2 10 5/8 11 1/4 nom.
Feb. 1 7 9 9 1/2 10 3/4 11 11 1/2 11 3/4
" 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 15 6 1/2 8 1/2 9 10 1/4 10 3/4 11 1/4 11 1/2
" 22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
March 1 . . . . . 10 1/2 11 11 1/2 nom.
" 8 8 1/2 9 1/4 10 1/2 11 11 1/2 . . . . .
" 15 7 9 9 1/2 11 11 1/4 12 12 1/4 12 1/2
" 22 8 9 1/2 10 11 1/2 11 3/4 12 1/2 13 13 1/2
" 29 9 10 3/4 11 12 12 13 nom.
April 5 9 1/2 10 1/2 11 12 1/2 12 3/4 14 . . . . .
" 12 9 10 1/2 12 12 1/2 13 1/2 . . . . .
" 19 8 9 1/2 10 12 13 . . . . .
" 26 8 9 9 1/2 11 11 1/4 12 1/2 . . . . .
May 3 7 8 3/4 9 10 1/4 10 1/2 11 1/2 . . . . .
"10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 17 8 9 1/2 10 1/2 11 1/4 11 1/2 13 . . . . .
" 24 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 31 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
June 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
July 5 . . . . . 7 10 . . . . . . . . . .
" 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 26 . . . . . 6 1/2 9 1/2 . . . . . . . . . .
Aug. 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 30 8 1/2 9 1/2 10 11 . . . . . . . . . .

        

TABLE--Showing the Date of Bloom and Frost, amount of Crop, etc., from 1848 to 1861.

Date. Bloom. Frost. 1st Bale at N. Orle'ns Crop.
1848-9 May 27 None. Aug. 5 2,728,496
1849-50 June 13 Nov. 3 Aug. 7 2,096,706
1850-1 June 27 Oct. 26 Aug. 11 2,355,257
1851-2 June 15 Dec.-- July 25 3,015,029
1852-3 June 24 Dec.-- Aug. 2 3,262,862
1853-4 June 6 Oct. 26 Aug. 9 2,930,027
1854-5 June 11 Nov. 13 July 25 2,847,339
1855-6 June 14 Oct. 25 July 27 2,527,845
1856-7 June 19 Oct. 1 July 15 2,958,519
1857-8 June 23 Nov. 20 Aug. 15 3,113,962
1858-9 June 2 Nov. 8 July 25 3,851,481
1859-60 June 1 Oct. 8 July 27 4,675,770
1860-1 May 28 Oct. 14 July 5  
1861-2 May 12   Aug. 1 (est.) 3,795,000

         The following statement of receipts of Cotton into Great Britain, Exports, Stocks, Consumption, &c., is taken From Messrs. James Hewitt & Co.'s Annual Review of the British Cotton Trade:

        

IMPORTS, EXPORTS, STOCKS AND CONSUMPTION OF COTTON, IN GREAT BRITAIN DURING THE PAST TEN YEARS.

 1860 1859. 1858. 1857. 1856. 1855. 1854. 1853. 1852. 1851.
Imported from America. . . . . 2,582,000 2,098,000 1,863,000 1,482,000 1,758,000 1,626,000 1,667,000 1,531,000 1,792,000 1,395,000
" Brazil. . . . . 102,000 118,000 106,000 168,000 122,000 135 000 107,000 132,000 143 000 100,000
" West Indies. . . . . 10,000 7,000 7,000 11,000 10,000 9,000 8,000 8,000 11,000 5 000
" Egypt. . . . . 110,000 100,000 106,000 76,000 114,000 115,000 81,000 119,000 190,000 68,000
" East Indies 563,000 511,000 361,000 680,000 464,000 394,000 304,000 473,000 221,000 326,000
Total bales received into G. Britain. . . . . 3,367,000 2,829,000 2,443,000 2 417,000 2,468,000 2,279,000 2,167,000 2,263 000 2,357,000 1,903,000
Exported. . . . . 609,000 437,000 348,000 337,000 358,000 316,000 316,000 349,000 282,000 268,000
Stock at the close of each year. . . . . 595,000 470,000 372,000 452,000 332,000 486,000 624,000 717 000 657,000 494,000
Taken for home consumption. . . . . 2,632,000 2,291,000 2,174,000 1,980,000 2,262,000 2,098,000 1,944,000 1,853,000 1,911,000 1,681,000
Average weekly consumption. . . . .50,615 44,115 41,820 37,708 43,518 40,355 37,384 35,645 36,761 31 949
Price of Middling Orleans, June 20. . . . . 6 1/8d. 6 7/8d. 7d. 8d. 6 3--16d. 6 1/2d. 5 7--16d. 6 1--16d. 5 3/8d. 5 1/4d.
" " Dec. 31. . . . . 7 3/8d. 6 7/8d. 7d. 6 1/4d. 7 5/8d. 5 11--16d. 5d. 6 1/8d. 5 9--16d 4 3/4d.
Taken on speculation. . . . . 538,000 370,000 547,000 594,000 856,000 999 000 486,000 685 000 1,131,000 270,000
Total crop of the United States 4,676,000 3,851,000 3,114,000 2 940,000 3,528,000 2,847,000 2,930,000 3 263,000 3,015,000 2 355 000
Consumption of the United States 810,000 700,000 596,000 720,000 653,000 594,000 611,000 671,000 603,000 404,000
Average weight per bale of imports into Great Britain 428 lb. 435 lb. 412 lb. 401 lb. 407 lb. 398 lb. 401 lb. 396 lb. 393 lb. 390 lb.

        

The Table below exhibits the Imports, Stocks, and Prices of Cotton at this Port for the year 1860.

  Jan. Feb. Mar. April. May. June. July. August. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec.
Imports for each month. . . . . 483,000 351,000 372,000 406,000 506,000 272,000 174,000 117,000 88,000 72,000 60,000 269,000
Stocks of 1st of each month. . . . . 441,000 595,000 750,000 847,000 1,016 000 1,295,000 1,333,000 1,241,000 1,088,000 903,000 668 000 525 000
Prices Mid. Orl. 1st each mo. . . . . 6 7/8d. 7d. 7d. 6 3/4d. 6 5/8d. 6 5/8d. 6 1/8d. 5 7/8d. 6 1/8d. 6 1/2d. 7d. 7d.

        

TABLE--Showing the Total Foreign Exports of Cotton from America for five years.

Destin'n. 1859-60 1858-9 1857-8 1856-7 1855-6
Gt. Brit. . . . . 2,669,432 2,019,252 1,800,966 1,428 870 1,921,386
France. . . . . 589,587 350,696 384,002 413,357 489,637
N of E'pr 295,072 330,012 215 145 245,789 304,005
Oth. F.P. 220,082 221,443 181,842 164,632 248,578
Total. . . . . 3,774,173 3,021,403 2,590,455 2,252,657 2,954,606


Page 13

        

Weekly Receipts of Cotton in 1860-61.

DATE. M. & C Road. M. & T Road M. & O Road. M. & L.R. R'd. River. Wagons. Total.
Sept. . . . . 7 574 480 197 26 158 198 1,633
. . . . .14 1,215 958 700 12 216 400 3,501
. . . . .21 2 258 1,841 1,106 42 252 602 6,081
. . . . .28 4 770 2,243 2,823 39 396 403 10,674
Oct'r. . . . .5 5,999 2,683 2,364 30 800 852 12,728
. . . . .12 5,111 3,218 3,292 89 1,504 1 250 14,464
. . . . .19 8,450 3,443 2,794 125 2,108 1,058 17,978
. . . . .26 8,624 2,405 3,703 47 1,604 1,046 18,429
Nov'r. . . . .2 6,273 4,251 5,119 229 2,039 999 18,910
. . . . .9 8,499 3,290 3,982 376 2,739 849 19,285
. . . . .16 7,783 2,506 3,292 245 1,028 1,149 16,003
. . . . .23 7,532 2,698 2,454 126 3,250 1,103 17,163
. . . . .30 5,164 1,969 1,209 78 2,148 898 11,476
Dec'r. . . . .7 3,570 2,074 444 101 2 848 854 9,891
. . . . .14 2,982 1,457 642 49 3 408 752 9,290
. . . . .21 2,993 1,282 891 84 4,544 954 10,758
. . . . .28 2,341 1,517 1,133 126 5,112 853 11,082
Jan'y. . . . . 4 5,190 1,943 1,481 150 3,100 1,125 12,989
. . . . .11 7,020 4,249 3,046 342 3,280 1,020 18,957
. . . . .18 11,021 2,976 3,691 428 3,190 1,230 22,536
. . . . .25 14,989 2,497 2,627 267 4,340 1,127 25,847
Feb'y. . . . .1 12,192 2,737 1,235 230 2,142 487 19,023
. . . . .8 4,284 995 574 88 2,145 320 8,406
. . . . .15 7,516 1,168 792 111 3,488 341 13,416
. . . . .22 3,388 557 508 105 2 820 202 7,580
March. . . . .1 3,417 499 325 30 2,860 200 7,331
. . . . .8 2,327 267 330 61 1 040 387 4,412
. . . . .15 2,472 274 162 11 862 587 4,318
. . . . .22 1,186 145 270 36 822 602 3,061
. . . . .29 1,402 105 185 51 644 373 2,757
April. . . . . 5 1,618 200 413 20 643 369 3,263
. . . . . 12 809 140 237 22 322 196 1,726
. . . . . 19 610 130 130 7 160 112 1,149
. . . . . 26 200 79 44 . . . . . 162 90 575
May. . . . .3 186 25 34 1 224 84 554
. . . . .10 93 10 17 . . . . . 112 42 274
. . . . .17 82 7 18 . . . . . 98 36 241
. . . . .24 65 4 12 . . . . . 70 28 179
. . . . .31 42 4 7 . . . . . 57 42 130
June. . . . .7 35 1 8 . . . . . 161 15 220
. . . . .14 22 7 4 . . . . . 120 10 163
. . . . .21 20 1 3 . . . . . 75 . . . . . 99
. . . . .28 10 1 1 . . . . . 98 7 117
July. . . . .5 19 . . . . . 1 . . . . . 92 . . . . . 112
. . . . .12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 . . . . . 71
. . . . .19 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 . . . . . 48
. . . . .26 . . . . . 2 . . . . . . . . . . 86 . . . . . 88
Aug. . . . .2 1 . . . . . 1 . . . . . 63 . . . . . 65
. . . . .9 10 5 . . . . . . . . . . 152 60 227
. . . . .16 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 22 155
. . . . .23 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 10 132
. . . . .30 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 12 136

        

TABLE--Showing the Receipts of Cotton into the Various
Ports of America for five years.

Ports. 1859-60 1858-9 1857-8 1856-7 1855-6
N. Orl'n 2,272,500 1,669,274 1,576,409 1,435,000 1,661 433
Mobile. . . . . 804 470 704,406 522,364 503,177 659,738
Florida. . . . . 176,684 173,484 122,351 136,344 144,404
Texas. . . . . 224,263 192,062 145,286 89,882 116,078
Georgia. . . . . 500 788 475,788 282,973 322,111 389,444
S. Cr'lina 505,653 480,653 406,251 397,331 495,976
N. C'lina 75,030 37,482 23,999 27,147 26 098
Va., etc. . . . . 118,332 118,332 35,329 28,527 34,673
Total. . . . . 4,675 770 3,851,481 3,113,962 2,939,519 3,527,845

        

Weekly Shipments of Cotton from Memphis From Sept. 1, 1860, to Aug. 31,1861.

DATE. N. Orleans. Ohio River. St. Louis. Eur'e & N'h Points Int. P'ts. TOTAL.
September. . . . .7 133 1,059 71 . . . . . . . . . . 1,263
. . . . .14 965 1,605 70 . . . . . . . . . . 2,580
. . . . .21 615 1,129 10 . . . . . . . . . . 1,754
. . . . .28 2,103 3,911 25 . . . . . . . . . . 6,039
October. . . . .5 1,430 2,863 48 191 . . . . . 4,532
. . . . .12 3,752 4,948 835 . . . . . . . . . . 9,535
. . . . .19 8,200 3,529 694 643 . . . . . 13,066
. . . . .26 11,136 8,347 715 901 . . . . . 21,099
November. . . . .2 14,476 7,561 76 916 . . . . . 23,029
. . . . .9 5,267 6,242 323 . . . . . . . . . . 11,832
. . . . .16 11,973 5,522 1,010 . . . . . 3 18,508
. . . . .23 3,398 5,079 39 251 . . . . . 8,767
. . . . .30 5,715 3,142 . . . . . 19 . . . . . 8,876
December. . . . .7 7,119 2,667 1 687 . . . . . 10,474
. . . . .14 7,002 4,023 136 668 . . . . . 11,829
. . . . .21 10,083 1,146 . . . . . 415 . . . . . 11,644
. . . . .28 14,616 945 100 884 . . . . . 16,545
Jaunary. . . . .4 7,970 3,055 1 644 . . . . . 11,670
. . . . .11 15,429 6,476 58 378 . . . . . 22,341
. . . . .18 7,058 5,342 5 811 . . . . . 13,216
. . . . .25 2,808 3,850 . . . . . 1,020 30 7,708
February. . . . .1 6,124 7,511 804 1,387 4 15,830
. . . . .8 6,313 8,372 1,613 1,130 . . . . . 17,428
. . . . .15 8,240 7,751 1,390 836 30 18,247
. . . . .22 4,986 7,985 631 509 13 13,124
March. . . . .1 2,618 6,166 1,240 715 8 10,747
. . . . .8 4,087 7,748 785 394 63 13,077
. . . . .15 4,441 6,078 86 . . . . . 8 10,613
. . . . .22 1,262 5,849 275 . . . . . 101 7,487
. . . . .29 1,276 5,338 329 . . . . . 18 6,981
April. . . . .5 1,277 3,671 16 165 165 5,294
. . . . .12 670 2,794 . . . . . . . . . . 152 3,616
. . . . .19 419 1,651 700 1,229 . . . . . 3,999
. . . . .26 126 419 63 . . . . . . . . . . 610
May. . . . .3 25 120 37 . . . . . 249 431
. . . . .10 102 . . . . . 633 . . . . . 468 1,203
. . . . .17 951 . . . . . 807 . . . . . 5 1,763
. . . . .24 40 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201 241
. . . . .31 26 . . . . . . . . . . 196 351 573
June. . . . .7 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 59
. . . . .14 44 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 59
. . . . .21 70 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 146
. . . . .28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 34
July. . . . .5 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 55
. . . . .12 48 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 102
. . . . .19 21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 34
. . . . .26 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
August. . . . .2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 12
. . . . .9 10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 107
. . . . .16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300 300
. . . . .23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 25
. . . . .30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 84
Total 184,366 153,894 13,802 14,989 2,806 369,857

         As regards the coming crop, very little can at this time be said. Up to the l5th of August, the prospect was favorable for one of the largest yields ever known, but the heavy, protracted, and general rains that have since fallen throughout the entire Cotton-growing region from which we have advices, have materially changed the aspect of affairs, and rendered useless any speculations or estimates as to the extent of the crop. Much--in fact everything--depends upon the character of the weather during the next three or four weeks. The damage already sustained in the shape of rust, shedding of the younger bolls, undue growth, etc., is severe--perhaps irremediable-- and it is only the most favorable weather from this


Page 14

time forth that would seem to justify expectations of even an average yield. Our planting friends seem unanimous in the wise determination to withhold their crops from market, until political affairs become more settled. Up to the 31st of August, (the date of doing this report) the first bale of the new crop had not been received in this city. The first bale of last year's crop came to hand on the 2d of August, and the receipts up to the 31st had embraced 275 bales.

         The total receipts of Cotton at this point during the past year were 369,633 bales, against 398, 791 bales in 1859-60--a decrease this year of 29,159 bales. The shipments during the same period embraced 369,858 bales, against 391,918 bales in 1859-60--decrease this year 22,061 bales.

        The annexed table exhibits the

        

Total Crop of Cotton and amount of same consumed in America, during the past thirty-four years:

Year. Crop. Consum'd.
1859-60 4,675,770 978,043
1858-59 3,851,481 760,218
1857-8 3,114,000 595,562
1856-7 2,939,519 702,138
1855-6 3,527,845 652,739
1854-5 2,847,339 593,584
1853-4 2,930,027 610,571
1852-3 3,262,822 670,009
1851-2 3,015,029 603,029
1850-1 2,355,257 404,108
1849-50 2,066,706 487,769
1848-49 2,728,596 518,039
1847-8 2,247,634 531,772
1846-7 1,778,651 427,969
1845-6 2,100,537 422,597
1844-5 2,394,503 389,006
1843-4 2,030,409 346,744
1842-3 2,378,875 325,129
1841-2 1,683,574 267,850
1840-1 1,634,945 297,288
1839-40 2,177,835 295,193
1838-9 1,360,522 276,018
1837-8 1,801,497 246,063
1836-7 1,422,930 222,540
1835-6 1,360,725 236,733
1834-5 1,254,328 216,888
1833-4 1,205,394 196,413
1832-3 1,070,438 194,412
1831-2 987,477 173,700
1830-1 1,038,848 182,142
1829-30 976,845 126,512
1828-9 857,744 118,833
1827-8 720,593 120,593

LEAF TOBACCO.

        In reference to this article, we invite attention to the following extract from our annual statement of Sept. 1st, 1860, furnishing a history of the introduction of this article of commerce into our market, and the progress made in that particular branch of trade up to the date above specified:

"The completion of the Memphis and Ohio Railroad to points within the tobacco growing counties north of us, early in the summer of 1859, induced shipments in the fall and winter months of a few hogsheads of that year's crop to this market, but with the 1st of February last, when the crop of 1860 began to be sent forward, may Memphis be regarded us urging her advantages as a market for the sale of the article. At that time a couple of our energetic commission houses made arrangements for the inspection and sampling of Tobacco, and well qualified inspectors were appointed, in accordance with the legal provisions of the State, to take charge of the duties pertaining to the office. Fearful of the chances of finding sale for any considerable amount of the article, during the past season, those engaged in the business simply urged growers to the consideration of the importance of lending their aid to the upbuilding of a market at this now most natural outlet for the large amount of Tobacco grown in the country, made adjacent to her by the extension of a branch of her railroad system. Could sellers have been warranted in assuring their planting friends of their ability to sell at fair prices, all the Tobacco that might have been offered in the market, a much larger amount would have sought sale here. Nevertheless, the amount sold under the circumstances, and at figures giving such universal satisfaction, warrants the conclusion that growers of the article are favorably inclined to the enterprise; and now that the experience of the past season has demonstrated that all of this article that may be offered here, will find ready sale at remunerative prices, we may confidently anticipate a heavy increase in this branch of our business."

        

TABLE--Showing the weekly prices of Tobacco during the year.

DATE. Lugs. Leaf inf. to com. Fair leaf Fineleaf Choice & select.
Sept'ber.7 2 @ 2 3/4 4 @ 4 1/2 5 @ 5 1/2 6 @ 7 -- @ 8
" 14 2 1/2 3 4 4 1/2 4 4 3/4 5 7 --8
" 21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oct. 5 2 2 3/4 4 4 1/2 5 5 1/2 6 7 --8
"12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
"19 3 3 3/4 4 5 5 1/2 6 1/4 6 1/2 7 1/2 8 8 1/2
"26 3 4 4 1/2 5 1/4 5 1/2 6 1/2 6 3/4 7 1/2 8 9
Nov. 2 3 1/4 4 1/2 5 6 6 1/4 7 7 1/4 8 8 1/2 9
" 9 3 3 1/2 4 5 6 7 7 1/2 8 8 1/2 9
"16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1/2 8 . . . . .
" 23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1/4 8 . . . . .
"30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dec. 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 14 . . . . . 4 5 1/2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
"21 3 1/4 4 1/2 5 6 6 1/4 7 1/4 7 1/2 8 1/2 9 10
"28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Jan. 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 18 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 9 1/2
" 25 3 3 1/2 4 5 1/2 6 6 1/2 7 8 8 1/2 9
Feb. 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
March 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 15 2 4 4 1/2 5 1/2 6 6 1/2 7 8 9 1/2 10
" 22 2 1/2 3 1/2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
"29 2 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
April 5 2 1/2 4 1/2 5 5 1/2 . . . . . . . . . . 9 10
" 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
"19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
"26 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
May 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 24 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 31 2 1/2 4 5-- 6-- 6 3/4 7 3/4 9 9 1/2
June 7 . . . . . 5 5 1/2 6 6 1/2 7 8 9 10
" 14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
July 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 12 nominal nominal nominal nominal nominal
" 19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 26 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Aug. 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 30 2 1/2 4 5 5 1/2 6 6 1/2 7 8 9 10

        The results of the past season warrant all the conclusions contained in the foregoing extract. Owing to the great and general drought of the spring and summer of 1860, the crop grown was considerably short of the preceding, particularly in that portion of country trading at our market. The crop was probably nearly a half less than


Page 15

the one grown in 1859. But notwithstanding the yield was greatly less, the shipments to and sales in our market have equaled, if not exceeded, those of the commercial year ending Sept. 1st, 1860. The prices paid have been remunerative to the grower. Up to the time of the blockade, the maximum paid was $10; the minimum $2 50 for the lightest description of chaffy Lugs. The average of prices, considering the general inferiority of the weed, was high, up to that time. With the inception of the blockade, operations for a time were suspended, and subsequently in a few instances sales were effected at a small decline; but recently all offering have been taken at figures fully equal to those ruling in the beginning of the season, and the year closes with an active demand, with scarcely any stock on the market. The year's receipts sum up 2,836 hogsheads, and the shipments 2,791 hhds. The reader's attention is directed to the preceding statement of prices current at the close of each week throughout the year.

MANUFACTURED TOBACCO.

         The Memphis market for the sale of this article has been an increasing one since the opening of the first house for its sale on manufacturers' account. We have now three houses exclusively in that line of business, and two others who connect it with some other departments of trade. Within the last two years, it has proved for the manufacturer a more ready market, with more prompt returns, than either New Orleans, Louisville or Cincinnati, and to the purchasers equally advantageous--they having been enabled to purchase at less prices and on as good terms as could be offered at any other point. As evidence of this, merchants from Hickman, Columbus, Cairo and Paducah, have (until the blockade obstructed intercourse between Memphis and the three last-named places) obtained their supplies largely from this point, and merchants from Natchez and Columbus, Miss., say they find better assortments in our market than in any other now open to them. The demand at this point comprises every grade of manufactured tobacco, from the coarsest quality of Western, for negro use, to the finest fancy brands of the most noted Virginia manufacture. The only manner in which merchants can satisfy themselves as to relative advantages of different markets, is by trial and comparison, and we feel assured that all who give the Memphis market a fair test, will find the assortment as full, the prices as low, and the terms as favorable, as any other point in the country.

         The receipts of the past year embrace 12,505 boxes and 4,182 cases and packages--an amount known to be largely in excess of any previous year. No account has hitherto been kept of the actual receipts from year to year, but, in future we shall be able to firnish tables showing the relative increase.

COFFEE.

         From the Annual statement of Messrs. II. T. Lonsdale, Nathan & Co., of New Orleans, we learn that the total receipts of Coffee at that port from Rio, during the year ending with 1st of July, embraced 284, 956 bags, against 298,335 bags in 1859-60, and 426,476 bags in 1858-59. The total exports of Coffee from Rio to all parts of America, for the year ending 31st May, are stated at 1,084,400 bags, 737,900 bags of which have entered at Atlantic, and 346,500 bags through Gulf ports. These figures show an increase as compared with last year of 138,987 bags, and as compared with 1858-59, of 307,535 bags. The quantity sold in New Orleans for consumption, during the past year, was 293,941 bags, leaving a stock on hand in that city, on the 1st of July, of only 6,103 bags. The total stock in the country, at that date, was estimated at 172,000 bags, of which 136,000 bags were held in New York; 26,000 in Baltimore, and 4,000 in Boston. The stock on hand at the above date, last year, was 43,000 bags, showing an increase this year of 129,000 bags.

         The local market for Coffee opened on the 1st of last September at 15 1-2 @ 16c. for Fair to Good Fair, and 16 1-2 @ 17c. for Prime to Choice, with light stocks, and an active demand from the local trade and for shipment to the interior. Prices experienced a gradual decline from this date, owing to liberal receipts and stocks, and on the 1st of November 141-2 @ 15 1-2c. were the ruling figures for Fair to Choice. The financial troubles of this period continued to depress the market, and by the close of December prices had further declined to 131-2 @ 14 1-2, with very little doing. There was no further change in prices until about the middle of March, when Fair went down to 12 3/4 @ l3c., and Prime to Choice l3 3/4 @ l4 1/4c.--the lowest point of the entire season. The political difficulties which began to develop themselves at this period, embracing the threatened blockade of Southern ports, involving a cutting off of supplies, together with the limited stocks known to be in New Orleans, caused more firmness on the part of holders, and prices commenced to advance. This upward movement continued to progress steadily, and by the 1st of July, Fair to fully Fair was selling at 20 c., and Prime to Choice at 22c., a very heavy business having in the meantime been transacted, and our market patronized by dealers from far distant sections of the country, who had never before thought of looking to Memphis for supplies. The market continued active up to the date of closing this report, with a further advance in prices equal to 10 @ 15 cents per pound, and with light stocks and great firmness on the part of holders, we now quote Fair to fully Fair 34 @ 35c., and Prime to Choice 40c. The receipts of the season, at this point, embrace 30,458 bags.

SUGAR AND MOLASSES.

         In glancing at the the operations of our market in Louisiana Sugars, during the past year, we find a very considerable increase over any former similar period in our history, albeit the political and financial revulsions of the year have had more or less influence in restricting the demand for and consumption of the article. The increase in receipts and sales, therefore, is due entirely to the enlargement and extension of our trade, in many instances to very remote regions, and to the additional fact that our dealers were prepared to offer inducements to the interior trade, which, all things considered, could not be surpassed in the great Southern mart itself. And while we find that the year's receipts have been unusually large, stocks at no one time were cumbersome or unwieldy, the demand for consumption throughout having been steady and well maintained. The fluctuations in prices have been few in number, and only to a limited extent, as is


Page 16

shown by the weekly statement of quotations, hereto appended.

TABLE--Showing the Weekly Prices of Molasses, Coffee
and Sugar, throughout the year.

        

Illustration


         According to the annual statement of Mr. Champomier, of New Orleans, the total yield of Louisiana Sugars, of the crop of 1860-61, was 228,753 hhds, or 263,065,000 lbs., against 221,840 hhds. in 1859-60, and 362,296 hhds. in 1858-59. These figures do not include 1,330 hhds. of the crop of 1860-61 produced in Texas, giving a total crop of 230,083 hhds. Of the amount 195,499 hhds. were made by the old process, and 83,263 hhds. were refined, clarified, etc. The shortness of the crop under review was due in great part to the severe and protracted drouth of the early part of the season; the fields were baked by the heat of the sun, and with an entire absence of rain, the cane was parched and withered. Another cause of injury were the storms of August and October, which inundated many plantations, while on others the cane was not only prostrated and rendered comparatively worthless, but many sugar-houses and purgeries were blown down and machinery damaged. The season for grinding, however, proved unusually propitious, and thus much of this damage was retrieved, and an average yield secured.

         From reliable data we estimate the total stock now in the State of Louisiana at 10,000 hhds., of which about 3,000 hhds. are in New Orleans. Here the stock is comparatively light--225 hhds. The entire receipts of the season foot up 9,588 hhds., and 6,214 bbls.

         Passing on to the Molasses trade of the city, we also find a marked improvement in the aggregate as compared with previous years. The extension of our trade has brought hither innumerable customers who never before visited this market, but who have at all times throughout the year found ample stocks from which to make selections, and at prices as favorable, transportation added, as the same article could be purchased in New Orleans. The demand has also been augmented in some degree by the increased consumption, especially on the plantations of this and adjoining sections, where Molasses has tended greatly to supply the place of meats, and become in fact an article of prime necessity. The total yield from the last Sugar crop is estimated at 18,414,550 gallons, against 17,854,100 in 1859-60. The receipts at this point embrace 763,760 gallons, or 19,094 bbls., of which but a limited amount remains on hand. Prices throughout the year have varied but little, as is shown by the preceding table.

CORN.

        The crop of this important cereal in the Southern country generally, for the year 1860, was a partial failure, owing to the dry and unfavorable character of the weather during the early part of the season, which prevented good stands and otherwise impeded the prospects of the growing crop. The yield, therefore, being light, the deficiency was necessarily made up from the northwestern States, where, under more favorable circumstances, an abundant crop was produced; hence we find that the amount of Corn received in this city during the year, and disposed of by our merchants, exceeds by far the operations of any previous year in our history. The market opened on the first of September with a comparatively light stock on hand, supplies having been pretty generally exhausted by the active demand experienced during the two preceding months, and low water in the upper Mississippi having in great part cut off our usual source of supply. The sales of the early part of the month were chiefly from levee, and at 55 @ 60c per bushel for Yellow and Mixed and 60 @ 62 1/2c for White. The market continued steady until the latter part of the month, when stocks having been reduced to a very low point, prices advanced 2 1/2 @ 3c and the month closed firm--the receipts having comprised 16,970 bags. The market for October opened active and buoyant, with more liberal receipts, and by the close of the first week a further advance of 2 @ 3c per bushel had been established, lots of Yellow and Mixed commanding 60 @ 65c and Prime White 67 1/2 @ 70c. The market remained in this condition, with only slight fluctuation, until about the 25th, when with improved navigation and heavy receipts, holders yielded 2 @ 2 1/2c, and the market closed quiet at 60 @ 62 1/2c for


Page 17

Yellow and Mixed and 64 @ 65c for White. The business of the mouth was chiefly for the supply of regions in North Alabama, Georgia and the Carolinas, which had hitherto looked to other markets. Month's receipts, 23,983 bags.

         There was no change of consequence in the market until the latter part of November, say the 20th, when the new crop beginning to arrive very freely, and with large stocks of the old in dealers' hands, prices began to droop and by the 25th were from 3 to 5c lower. In addition to this, the country demand was less active and the market for the month closed dull at 57 1/2 @ 60c for Yellow and Mixed, and 60 @ 62 1/2c for White (old crop). The new crop was neglected and dragged heavily at 52 1/2 @ 55c. Month's receipts 34,221 bags.

         Prices continued to tend downward and by the close of the first week in December a further reduction to 58 @ 60c and from 55 to 57 1/2 c, and subsequently, on the following week, to 52 1/2 @ 55c for Yellow, Mixed and White was submitted to by holders--the receipts having been largely in excess of the demand. No further change occurred and the market for the month closed dull as above, with receipts of 23,781 bags.

         During the first half of January, the market was quiet, but before the close of the third week, under the influence of political causes, a lively demand sprang up, and prices soon rallied to the extent of 2 @ 3c per bushel, which was maintained until the close--stocks in the meantime having been materially reduced, while the receipts had fallen to 17,833 bags. This spur in the market, added to a fine stage of water in all the upper rivers, induced heavy shipments to this point during the first two weeks of February, by which time the advance last referred to had been lost, the demand momentarily checked, and the market pretty well glutted. Affairs moved along in this wise until the close of the month, when, with a moderate inquiry and ample stocks, we quoted yellow and mixed 56c. and white 58c. March opened with a good demand, but, with serious impediments to transportation eastward by railroad, owing to an immense press of through freight upon the Memphis and Charleston and Mobile and Ohio roads, which in great measure prevented the usual local accommodations. The receipts, too, opened briskly, and, as the sequel proved, were by far the largest of any similar period of the season; hence it was that immense stocks soon accumulated, and prices f ll to 52 1/2 @ 55c., and finally, on the 29th, to 50 @ 52 1/2c. per bushel--the deliveries of the month having reached the large amount of 99,611 bags.

         During the first two weeks of April with a continuance of the unfavorable circumstances above referred to, holders conceded a further reduction of 2 @ 2 1/2c., but on the l7th, with the war proclamation of the Northern dictator to hand, and apprehensions of an early stoppage of supplies from the north, added to a considerable improvement in the St. Louis market, prices rallied to 55 @ 56 and 57 @ 60c. and by the close of the month to 60c. for yellow and mixed and 65c. for white. This excitement in the market proved of temporary duration, and supplies continuing to pour in with increased vigor, a reaction soon ensued, and by the 3d of May, the market was dull at a decline of 5c. per bushel. Toward the middle of the month, however, the long threatened blockade of the Northern government was placed in operation, and, by the close of the mouth, prices had gradually stiffened, until 65 @ 75c. were the ruling figures. Stocks were ample, and prospects for the coming crops most encouraging. The tendency of the market from June 1st to date has been uniformly downward; prices in view of the reduced inquiry and the very favorable indications of a large yield from the coming crop, gradually giving way until the middle of August, when offerings were freely made at 45 @ 50c., in [ ] ots. During the past two weeks, there has been some little demand, with sales at 50 @ 52 1/2c.

        

TABLE--Showing the Weekly Prices of Corn during the year.

DATE. YELLOW and MIXED. WHITE.
September. . . . . . . 7 60 @ 62 64 @ 67
"14 . . . . . . . . . .
"21 . . . . . . . . . .
"28 60 62 1/2 65 67 1/2
October. . . . . 5 . . . . . . . . . .
"12 65 67 1/2 70
"19 . . . . . . . . . .
"26 60 62 1/2 64 65
November. . . . . 2 . . . . . . . . . .
" 9 . . . . . . . . . .
" 16 . . . . . 65
" 23 57 1/2 60 60 62 1/2
" 30 . . . . . . . . . .
December. . . . . 7 . . . . . . . . . .
" 14 55 57 1/2 58 60
" 21 52 1/2 55
" 28 . . . . . . . . . .
January. . . . . 4 . . . . . . . . . .
" 11 . . . . . . . . . .
" 18 58 58
" 25 57 1/2 58 58
February. . . . . 1 56 57 58 60
" 8 56 58
" 15 55 56 58 59
" 22 56 58
March. . . . . 1 55 56 57 58
" 8 52 1/2 55 55
" 15 50 52 1/2
" 22 50 52 1/2 55
"29 50 52 52 1/2
April. . . . . 5 48 50 50 52 1/2
" 12 . . . . . . . . . .
" 19 55 56 57 1/2 60
" 26 60 65
May. . . . . 3 55 57 1/2 65
" 10 65 70
" 17 65 75
" 21 70 75
" 31 65 67 1/2 75
June. . . . . 7 60 65
" 14 . . . . . . . . . .
" 21 50 52 1/2 55 57 1/2
" 28 50 55
July. . . . . 5 50 50 52 1/2
" 12 . . . . . . . . . .
" 19 . . . . . . . . . .
" 26 . . . . . . . . . .
August. . . . . 2 47 1/2 50 50 52
" 9 45 47 1/2 50
" 16 50 55
" 23 . . . . . . . . . .
" 30 47 1/2 50 50 52 1/2

OATS.

         For the last three or four years, the Oat crop has been cultivated in the South with indifferent success; but being a subordinate article of produce, easily supplied by the substitution of hay and fodder, the failure of the crop excited but little concern in any quarter. The yield of the crop of 1859'-60, in this section, having been light, and the disposition having become general among planters


Page 18

to pay more attention to the culture of this cereal, with the view of exempting themselves from the necessity of looking to the North for supplies, a more vigorous and systematic effort toward its cultivation was made last spring, and with very gratifying success. The large quantities thus taken for seed purposes, in addition to the demand for consumption, caused a material increase in shipments to this a point, which, from its position, is looked to for supplies by the agricultural districts of several of the interior States, and the receipts were swelled from about 10,000 bags in 1859-'60, to within a fraction of 50,000 bags, or 125,000 bushels, in 1860-'61.

        

TABLE--Showing the Weekly Prices of Oats, from Levee,
throughout the Year.

DATE. PRICE.
September. . . . . 7 38 40
". . . . . 14 38 40
". . . . . 21 40 41
". . . . . 28 49 1/2 41
October. . . . . 5 42 45
". . . . . 12 43 45
". . . . . 19 45 50
". . . . . 26 42 1/2 45
". . . . . 2 40 42 1/2
November. . . . . 9 40 42 1/2
". . . . . 16 . . . . .
". . . . . 23 40. . . . .
". . . . . 30 33 35
December. . . . . 7 35 37 1/2
". . . . . 14 . . . . .
". . . . . 21 33 35
". . . . . 28 33 37 1/2
January. . . . . 4 . . . . .
". . . . . 11 35 37 1/2
". . . . . 18 40 45
". . . . . 25 45. 50
February. . . . . 1 45 55
". . . . . 8 . . . . .
". . . . . 15 42 1/2 50
". . . . . 22 43 45
March. . . . . 1 40 45
March. . . . . 8 40 42 1/2
". . . . . 15 35 38
". . . . . 22 33 35
". . . . . 29 . . . . .
April. . . . . 5 . . . . .
". . . . . 12 . . . . .
". . . . . 19 35 37 1/2
". . . . . 26 40 45
May. . . . . 3 . . . . .
". . . . . 10 45 50
". . . . . 17 50 55
". . . . . 24 55 60
". . . . . 31 . . . . .
June. . . . . 7 60. . . . .
". . . . . 14 . . . . .
". . . . . 21 . . . . .
". . . . . 28 . . . . .
July. . . . . 5 . . . . .
". . . . . 12 . . . . .
". . . . . 19 . . . . .
". . . . . 26 60 65
August. . . . . 2 60 65
". . . . . 9 . . . . .
". . . . . 16 . . . . .
". . . . . 23 . . . . .
". . . . . 30 60 62 1/2

         The market for the current year opened with light stocks and a limited inquiry, the ruling figures being 38 @ 40c., from levee. Receipts improved towards the close of September, but the demand fully keeping pace with supplies, prices gradually stiffened until the middle of October,0 when round lots commanded 45 @ 50c. A week later, and stocks had accumulated to such an extent that prices gave way 2 1/2 @ 5c., at which the market continued steady until the last week in November, when, with large stocks and a considerable falling off in the demand, owing to restrictions upon railroad shipments to the interior, figures were reduced to 33 @ 35c. The market experienced only slight fluctuations from this time until the middle of January--stocks in the meantime being ample, with a moderate demand--when a lively inquiry springing up from he local trade and for seed purposes, rates advanced to 40 @ 50c. for white and black. Under the influence of this inquiry, the market was somewhat exited during the five or six following weeks, with little or no change in prices until the middle of March, when heavy stocks depressed the market, and holders offered freely at 33 @ 35c. A moderate business was transacted be ween this date and the latter part of April--prices varying but little-- when the "blockade" had the effect to stimulate the local demand and force prices upward 2 1/2 @ c. Stocks at this period having become reduced to some3,000 bags, and all in the hands of two or three parties, the market continued to advance, and by the close of May was firm at 55 @ 60c per bushel. During the months of June, July and August, the demand has been comparatively limited, and prices have ruled steady at 60 @ 62 1/2c. per bushel from store. The yield of the present crop is, perhaps, the largest ever produced in this section, and of the best quality.

WHEAT.

         The receipts of wheat in this market for the year ending September 1st, 1858, were estimated at 300,000 bushels, in 1850 at 125,000 bushels, and in 1860 at 100,000 bushels, the quantity having regularly decreased from year to year. This falling off was occasioned by the continued failure of the crop in this section, from drought and other causes, and did not occasion remark in milling circles, as the causes were perfectly well understood. The crop now under review has, on the contrary, been the largest and most valuable ever produced in this section, and we believe the remark applies with equal force to all portions of the Southern Confederacy. The enforcement of the Northern blockade about the time for planting, caused agriculturalists generally to pay especial attention to the culture of this important cereal. A much larger area of land was sown than ever before, and, with favorable weather for growing, maturing and harvesting, the yield has proven not only the most prolific on record, but of the very best and choicest quality. The meagre receipts of the crop of 1859-'60, during the fall months, prevented the regular operation of our city mills, and but little attention was paid to the article, which, however, found a ready market either for home manufacture or export, at prices ranging from $1 00 to $1 25 for common to prime and choice. The first receipts of the new crop reached the city June 14th --against the 10th of May In 1860--from the plantation of Mr. E. Brooks, in this county, and sold at $150 per bushel. The deliveries during the remainder of the month comprised only 1,375 bags, and the market did not open regularly until about the 10th of July, when the article began to arrive freely, and our mills were in general operation. Prices in the meantime had ranged from $1 to $1 25, but the supply at the above date having exceeded the demand, holders conceded a decline of 5 @ l0c. The receipts of July summed up about 65,000 bushels, and by the close of the month prices had fallen to $1 for prime and choice and 80 @ 90c for inferior and common. During the first two weeks in August there was but little variation from these quotations, but, under the influence of gradually receding receipts and a steady local and considerable shipping inquiry, holders displayed more firmness, and by the l5th an advance of 2 @ 2 1/2c per bushel had been established. No changes of importance have transpired in the market during the past fortnight, and we close our report upon a quiet market at $1 for prime and 80 @ 90c for inferior.

FLOUR.

        The business of the city in this article during the past year exhibits a remarkable increase over that of any former


Page 19

season. The general failure of the wheat crop of the Southern country for the year 1859--'60, and the consequent falling off in home production, created an unusual demand for flour, and as the facilities afforded purchasers in this market were unsurpassed in the South or West, our trade has been much heavier and more widely extended than ever before.

        As regards the quantity of flour manufactured in the city during the past year, we find it to have been comparatively limited--say 50,000 barrels--fully 40 000 barrels of which have been made from the new crop, and within the past three months. The capicity of the various mills of the city is about 600 barrels per day, consuming 3,000 bushels of wheat, and since the 1st of July these establishments have all been taxed to the utmost to supply the home demand. The quality of the flour made in this city is unsurpassed, and stands A.1 in New Orleans and all the coast markets--commanding, in fact a decided premium over any of the fancy brands made in the Northern States. Hence, our mills are seldom at a loss for purchasers, especially for all choice brands, and at full and remunerative prices. The receipts of the year have been the largest ever known in this market, and this, too, in the face of a blockade from about the middle of the season up to the present time, which has prevented immense quantities from reaching the city. The supply, too, has always been ample, and large or small orders of any description have been readily filled.

         In respect to prices, we find that the average of superfine throughout the year has been $6 50 per barrel, of Fancy $7 50, and of Extra $8 @ 8 50--scarcely equal to that of former seasons. The market opened, 1st September, at $5 60 @ 5 75 for Superfine and $7 50 @ 8 50 for Extras, and the month closed at the same figures. Receipts, 15,138 barrels. During October, with large stocks, prices declined 10 @ 15c on all grades, and continued to tend downward throughout November and December, by which time a decline of 50 @ 75c had been established. Receipts of October, 15,200 barrels; of November, 11,719 barrels, and of December, 16,019 barrels. Early in January, a good demand was expressed, and by the 10th, prices had fully recovered the decline noted. No further fluctuations occurred until the middle of April, when, with the enforcement of the Northern blockade, which it was then thought would materially restrict supplies, prices rallied, and continued to tend upward until the latter part of May, at which time Superfine was selling at $7 25 @ 7 50, and Choice and Fancy brands $8 50 @ 10, as in quality. In the meantime, the receipts of January had comprised 15,368 barrels; of February, 14,773 barrels; of March, 20,786 barrels; of April, 9,325 barrels; of May 9,781 barrels. The immense stocks on hand, June 1st, and the flattering yield of the new wheat crops then being harvested, tended to depress prices, which gradually declined to $6 50 @ 6 75 for Superfine and $8 @ 9 for Extra. From the 1st of July, at which date this decline was generally conceded, up to the present, rates have varied but little from the above figures, at which the market for the month and year closes firm. Receipts of June 9,455 barrels; of July 2,878 barrels, and of August,--barrels. The annexed table exhibits the price of the various grades at the close of each week, throughout the year:

        

TABLE--Showing the Weekly Prices of Flour during the year.

DATE. Fine. Superfine. Extra. Choice and Fancy.
Sept. 7 4 75 @ 5 00 5 60 @ 5 75 6 30 @ 6 80 7 50 @ 8 50
" 14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 21 . . . . . 5 50 5 75 . . . . . . . . . .
" 28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oct. 5 4 50 5 00 5 50 6 25 6 75 7 50 8 25
" 12 . . . . . 5 25 5 50 6 25 6 65 7 50 8 00
" 19 . . . . . 5 35 5 60 6 50 6 75 7 00 8 50
" 26 . . . . . 5 25 5 60 6 25 6 50 7 25 7 75
Nov. 2 4 75 5 00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 50 8 00
" 16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2 7 75
" 30 4 25 4 50 5 00 5 25 6 00 6 25 7 00 7 50
Dec. 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 50 8 00
" 28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 00 8 00
Jan. 4 4 50 4 75 5 25 5 50 5 75 6 50 . . . . .
"11 4 50 5 00 5 50 5 75 6 25 6 75 . . . . .
" 18 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 25 8 25
" 25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 00 8 00
Feb. 1 . . . . . 5 25 5 50 . . . . . 7 00 8 00
" 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
March 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 15 4 25 4 50 5 00 5 50 6 00 6 50 7 00 8 00
" 22 4 00 4 50 5 00 5 25 5 75 6 25 7 00 8 00
" 29 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
April 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 19 4 50 5 00 5 25 5 75 6 25 6 75 7 50 8 50
" 26 5 25 5 50 6 00 6 50 6 75 7 00 7 50 9 00
May 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 10 5 25 5 75 6 50 7 00 7 25 7 75 8 00 9 50
" 17 5 50 6 50 7 00 7 50 7 75 8 25 9 00 10 00
" 24 . . . . . 7 25 7 50 7 75 8 50 9 00 10 00
" 31 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
June 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 28 . . . . . 7 00 7 50 7 75 8 25 8 00 9 50
July 5 5 50 6 00 6 50 7 00 8 00 8 25 8 50
" 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 26 nominal. 6 50 7 50 8 00 8 50
Aug. 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 16 5 00 5 50 6 50 6 75 7 50 8 25 8 50 8 75
" 23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
" 30 . . . . . . . . . . 7 50 8 00 8 25 8 50

BACON, PORK AND LARD.

         The course of the market for these articles, during the last twelve months, will be briefly reviewed under one heading. The commencement of the season, in September last, found very light stocks on the market, with a good demand not only from the local trade but from remote regions which had previously looked elsewhere for supplies, but which having been brought into close connection with Memphis through the medium of our various railways, were beginning to test for themselves the superior advantages of our market. Mess Pork opened at $22 per barrel, Lard at 15c; Shoulders at 11 1/4 @ 11 1/2c; Clear Sides at 13 3/4 @ 14c, and Hams at 14 @ 15c. Early in September the receipts from the upper country were more liberal and the supply was largely in excess of the demand. This state of affairs continued until about the


Page 20

1st of January, prices in the meantime continuing gradually to decline, and during the first week in that month the market had reached the lowest points of the season, viz: Mess Pork $17; Lard 9 1/2 @ 10 1/2c; Shoulders 7 1/2 @ 8c; Harris 10 @ 11, and Clear and Rib Sides 10 @ 11c. The inquiry for Bacon, during the latter part of January, was pretty generally superseded by Bulk Pork--with which the market was amply supplied at 7c, hog round-- thus tending to a still further depression in the first named article. The demand for dry salted meats continued to prevail during the following four months, closing only with the season, about the first of May, with by far the largest aggregated transactions ever known in this market, vast quantities of the article having been taken for shipment to the St States of Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and the Carolinas. A good inquiry was also expressed during this period for all descriptions of Bacon, barrelled Pork and Lard, for the same points, and this, taken in connection with the prospective stoppage of future supplies from the North by virtue of the blockade, caused a material advance in all these articles, Mess Pork, on the 1st of May, commanding $22 @ 23 per barrel; Shoulders 10 @ 10 1/2c; Hams 12 @ 15c; and Ribbed and Clear Sides 13 @ 15c. Bulk Pork also exhibited considerable firmness at 10c for Sides; 8 @ 8 1/2c for shoulders; 9 1/2 @ 10c for Hams, and 9 1/4 @ 9 1/2c for hog round. The market continued steadily to improve, and on the 20th of June a further advance of $3 to $4 per barrel on Mess Pork, and of 2 @ 3c per pound on all qualities of Clear and Joint Bacon had been established.

         According to the annual report of the Cincinnati Price Current the pork packing season commenced about three weeks later than last year, and closed somewhat earlier. The number of hogs packed is set down as follows:

        
  1859 60 1860-61.
Ohio 681,908 624,798
Indiana 406,595 368,031
Illinois 503 735 521 991
Kentucky 3 2,487 251,896
Missouri 190,660 180,972
Tennessee 26,800 400
Iowa 166,623 162,204
Wisconsin 55,837 54,410
Grand total 2,354,645 2,155,702
Deficiency 199,943  

         Or a fraction less than 8 1/2 per cent. The following with regard to the weights of the past season, as compared with the previous year, together with the yield of Lard per hog, will be found interesting:

        
 Average weight per Hog.1859-60.[Average weight per Hog.] 1860-61. Yield of Lard per Hog.1859-60.[Yield of Lard per Hog.]1860-61.
Ohio, lbs. . . . . 191 6-19 226 26 30 1/2
Indiana. . . . . 192 1/4 212 3/4 27 30
Illinois. . . . . 191 224 1/3 30 34
Kentucky. . . . . 197 212 31 30 2/3
Missouri. . . . . 194 2-9 206 6-7 26 30 5-12
Tennessee. . . . . 189 ..... 26 .....
Iowa. . . . . 191 1/2 233 2/3 29 30 5-12
Wisconsin. . . . . 207 229 29 31

         An regards the aggregate weight of an equal number of hogs, the returns show an increase of 60,658,249 lbs, or the difference between 410,658,361 lbs in 1859-60 and 479,312,031 lbs in 1860-61. This is equal to exactly 14 1/2 per cent., so we find that by deducting from this the decrease in number, 8 1/2 per cent., we have a net increase of 5 3/4 per cent. as compared with the previous season.

TABLE--Showing the Weekly Prices of Mess Pork, Lard
and Bacon, throughout the year.

        

Illustration


         The yield of Lard per hog was generally better than last year, but notwithstanding this, owing to the increase in the number of hogs packed, the increase in quantity, as compared with last year, was not as large as might be at first supposed. The following figures show the comparison and the result, being the aggregate yield for each season, in lbs.

        The above figures show an increase of 5 3/4 per cent. in the supply, equal to 135,392 hogs, but when it is remembered that a great proportion of this increase is in Lard; that the increase of home consumption occasioned by


Page 21

the war is very great, that there is also a considerable increase in the area to be supplied and in the foreign demand, it will be seen that the supply is really small--in fact barely averaged.

         Early in June, under the influence of an active local and export demand, prices for all descriptions of meat advanced, and there was great firmness at 12 @ 12 1/2c for Shoulders; Ribbed Sides 16 @ 16 1/2c; Clear Sides 17 @ 17 1/2c, Hams 16 @ 17 1/2c ; Mess Pork $26 @ 27; and Lard 12 @ 15c, which figures have ruled, with slight and immaterial fluctuations, up to the present time. The wisdom and patriotism of several of our leading merchants and bankers--who, in order to guard against scarcity and the high prices to consumers which would have necessarily followed, a short time previous to the enforcement of the blockade, contributed funds sufficient to purchase $100,000 worth of provisions and ship the same to this city-- prevented any unusual advance in prices, and at the same time gave assurance that in addition to the large stocks in the hands of private dealers, supplies would be ample for all ordinary demands. The exigency, to meet which the purchase was made, failing to arise by the middle of July, the entire stock consisting of 3,000 barrels Pork and about 300 cks of Bacon, was disposed of by auction, at the Merchants' Exchange, and the profits arising from the sale devoted to charitable purposes.

HAY.

         The crop of the past year (1860-'61) was materially affected by the severe drouth experienced in many sections of the hay producing country during the latter part of the season, and the yield proved to be light--indeed, far below the average of former years. Under these circumstances, and with no prospect of a decreased consumption, it was confidently anticipated that p ices would rule high; and during the fall months there was a very marked increase in the speculative demand, and some of the heaviest transactions in the article on record transpired in various portions of the West. The past winter, however, proving to be quite mild and open, affording excellent pasturage for stock throughout the entire Southern country, there was a very considerate decrease in the demand and consumption, and, so far from the sanguine expectations of speculators as to high prices being realized, the article ruled at uniformly lower figures than for several previous years. A glance at the table of prices hereto appended, will show that the average price from September 1st to the latter part of April, when apprehensions of a blockade upon supplies began to be entertained, was a fraction under $24 per tun, and even when, a few weeks later, it was known with certainty that no further shipments would be made to this point, so well was our market supplied, that only a slight advance took place. It will also be seen that there were only slight fluctuations in the market during the first five months of the year, and those occasioned entirely by the movement of supply and demand, but that, during February, March and a portion of April, prices fell to $17 @ $18 for prime Timothy--the lowest point of the season. This result was produced by large receipts and the accumulation of unwieldy stocks, in view of which, holders modified their views, in order that the market might experience at least temporary relief. In anticipation of an early restriction of supplies from the upper country, a brisk demand sprung up during the last week in April, and prices advanced rapidly, until, on the 30th, sales were made at $28 @ $30 per tun for prime, and at $22 @ $24 for common. Stocks being ample, and the country demand having been pretty generally supplied during the season of low prices, the market experienced little or no change during the two following months, but ruled steady at $26 @ $30 for prime, from levee and store. The liberal demands subsequently expressed by army contractors and others, enhanced the price, early in June, to $35 per ton for prime, which figures have continued to rule, with but slight variations, up to the present time. The prospect for fall and winter supplies, with a continuance of the present blockade, are not of the most flattering character, and it behooves farmers and consumers generally to exercise the utmost economy in the use of the article.

        

TABLE--Showing the Weekly Prices of Hay (from Levee)
throughout the year.

DATE. PRIME. COMMON.
Sept. 7 $22 50 @ 25 00 $20 00 21 00
" 14 . . . . . . . . . .
" 21 . . . . . . . . . .
" 28 . . . . . . . . . .
Oct. 5 22 00 23 00 20 00 --
" 12 25 00 26 00 23 00 24 00
" 19 28 00 30 00 25 00 26 00
" 26 27 00 28 00 24 00 25 50
Nov. 2 28 00 29 00 24 00 25 00
" 9 26 00 27 50 23 50 24 00
" 16 25 00 26 00 22 00 23 00
" 23 24 00 25 00 21 50 22 00
" 30 22 50 23 00 20 00 21 00
Dec. 7 23 00 25 00 21 00 21 50
" 14 22 00 24 00 20 00 21 00
" 21 22 00 -- 20 00 --
" 28 . . . . . . . . . .
Jan. 4 . . . . . . . . . .
"11 . . . . . . . . . .
" 18 22 00 22 50 20 00 21 00
" 25 . . . . . . . . . .
Feb. 1 . . . . . . . . . .
" 8 20 00 -- 18 00 --
" 15 . . . . . . . . . .
" 22 17 50 18 50 15 00 --
March 1 17 00 18 00 14 50 15 00
" 8 . . . . . . . . . .
" 15 18 00 20 00 16 00 17 00
" 22 17 00 18 00 14 00 15 00
" 29 18 00 20 00 16 50 17 00
April 5 . . . . . . . . . .
" 12 20 00 21 00 NOMINAL
" 19 21 00 22 50 . . . . .
" 26 28 00 39 00 . . . . .
May 3 24 00 25 00 . . . . .
" 10 25 00 27 00 . . . . .
" 17 25 00 26 00 21 00 22 00
" 24 28 00 30 00 22 00 24 00
" 31 28 00 30 00 NOMINAL.
June 7 . . . . . . . . . .
" 14 . . . . . . . . . .
" 21 30 00 35 00 . . . . .
" 28 35 00 -- . . . . .
July 5 . . . . . . . . . .
" 12 . . . . . . . . . .
" 19 . . . . . . . . . .
" 26 . . . . . . . . . .
Aug. 2 35 00 -- . . . . .
" 9 35 00 -- . . . . .
" 16 . . . . . . . . . .
" 23 . . . . . . . . . .
" 30 32 00 35 00 26 00 28 00


Page 22

BAGGING AND ROPE.

         Prices for these articles have fluctuated considerably during the year now under review. The year commencing with September 1st, found bagging very firm at from 15 @ 16c per yard for common to extra hand--loom brands-- such as are manufactured in the vicinity of Lexington and Frankfort, Ky.; the "J. W. South" brand, manufactured at the penitentiary of that State, ranking at the head of hand-loom brands. At the same time, power-loom bagging was ranging at from 17 to 19c. brands. The power-loom brands sold in this market comprise in part all the brands manufactured in the country, among which may be mentioned the "Eagle" and "Empire Mills" of St. Louis, and "Randall's," "Hunt's" and "Globe" Mills, of Kentucky.

         The price of rope, at the opening of the season, as above, ranged from 8 1/2 to 9c for machine, and 8 @ 8 1/2c for hand spun. Of the machine rope, there are various brands which receive attention in this market, principal among which are "Richardson's Green Leaf," "Randall's Horse," "Hunt's" and "Allen & Co 's", of Kentucky, and "Eagle," "Todd," "Empire," and various other mills, of Missouri. The above prices were maintained with but slight and immaterial fluctuation, until ab ut the 1st of November, when it was apparent that holders would be compelled to make concessions in both bagging and rope, on account of a heavy decline in India bagging and the very free use being made of iron ties. The decline thus occasioned may be quoted at 1/2 @ 1c per yard and pound, followed by a dull and inactive market. There was very little change in the market, save a pretty free enquiry for rope during November and December, until about the beginning of the current year, from which time until the middle of May, both of these articles ruled very dull, in consequence of the financial revulsion attending the disordered state or political affairs[.] Indeed, such was the depression, that during the early part of the month machine rope could be had here at 6 1/2 @ 7c, power-loom bagging at 14 @ 15c and hand-loom ditto at 13 @ 14c. Stocks, however, had in the meantime become very much reduced. About the middle of May, when our merchants were made aware that Lincoln & Co. had effectually blockaded the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, thereby cutting off supplies of these articles from St. Louis, whence a great portion of the stock used here is received, the market experienced considerable advance, and rope, which could have been bought in May for 6 1/2c, now readily commands 9 1/2c, in large lots, and bagging, which was offered in May at 14c, had advanced to 18c. For some six weeks after the enforcement of the river blockade, we were compelled to rely upon the Louisville market, and the receipts by this source were pretty free until the 24th of June, when both these articles were declared contraband, and further supplies stopped by order of the Northern Government.

         Many parties argue that when the blockade is raised, bagging and rope will materially decline. In figuring about these things, however, our merchants and planters will do well to consider that the facilities for manufacturing have been seriously impaired by the financial pressure, in consequence of which the monied facilities of manufacturers have been to a conside able extent cut off. Stocks of both bagging and rope at present on hand are small and held at figures from 5 @ 7c in advance of those above quoted. Indeed, the market for all articles in this line, like our political affairs, is in a very unsettled condition. Annexed we give a table, showing the weekly fluctuations in prices throughout the year.

TABLE--Showing the Weekly Price of Bagging and Rope during the year.

        

Illustration



Page 23

        

MEMPHIS AND CHARLESTON RAILROAD.
RECEIPTS.

ARTICLES. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN. FEB. MAR. APRIL. MAY. JUNE. JULY. AUG. TOTAL.
Agricultural Implements. . . . . No. . . . . . . . . . . 36 27 101 136 63 19 12 10 3 5 412
Apples. . . . .barrels 4 14 28 11 7 23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 21 43 659
Boots and Shoes. . . . .packages 236 26 23 12 4 35 2 . . . . . 256 1 21 43 659
Butter. . . . .firkins and kegs 21 12 34 62 12 8 18 8 263 213 69 31 751
Bagging. . . . .pieces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 3,434 3.161 95 6,760
Beef. . . . .barrels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . 84 1 . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . 49 136
Bacon. . . . .casks 5 9 5 2 21 15 7 6 600 645 97 69 1,480
". . . . .tierces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329 . . . . . 451 . . . . . 3,698
Cotton. . . . .bales 10,802 33,720 35,251 13,795 40,982 18,605 7,387 3,237 468 87 42 37 164,413
Corn. . . . .sacks . . . . . 4 111 361 13 18 5 2,887 18 . . . . . 71 . . . . . 3,487
Coffee. . . . .sacks 129 1 1 1 2 1 3 11 4 . . . . . 230 191 574
Cotton Seed. . . . .sacks . . . . . 8 1,000 33 303 89 176 186 25 25 . . . . . . . . . . 1,845
Cotton Yarn. . . . .bales 30 121 101 44 32 36 . . . . . 15 . . . . . 99 59 110 647
Cotton Gins. . . . .No. . . . . . 3 8 2 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 9 9 42
Dry Goods. . . . .packages 568 57 416 45 22 146 149 107 657 781 530 403 3,881
Dried Fruit. . . . .sacks 387 930 2,325 1,017 473 623 246 27 99 71 . . . . . 23 6,221
" . . . . .barrels 27 . . . . . . . . . . 10 40 10 2 . . . . . 1 1 . . . . . . . . . . 91
Drugs. . . . .packages 8 36 2 6 5 5 2 5 129 397 191 . . . . . 878
Eggs. . . . .boxes 1 17 . . . . . . . . . . 6 13 11 1 3 31 67 23 173
". . . . .barrels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 32 145 . . . . . 67 36 8 297
Flour. . . . .barrels 4 4 7 12 9 11 6 5 134 5,590 1,456 8,711 15,949
Hides. . . . .No. 21 49 810 110 141 661 206 136 43 57 50 51 2,335
Hats. . . . .cases 39 36 68 4 1 . . . . . . . . . . 1 24 21 3 . . . . . 197
Live Stock. . . . .head 3 87 150 179 109 51 12 171 473 240 615 24 2,114
Leather. . . . .bundles and boxes 9 41 81 39 2 31 92 . . . . . 267 689 348 210 1,809
Lumber. . . . .feet 474,800 341,000 664,750 745,000 155,100 226,680 321,500 798,000 350,500 183,000 111,000 56,600 4,377,930
Merchandise. . . . .pounds 299,814 282,578 218,271 306,778 263,413 210,697 251,541 287,029 283,619 793,690 335,758 325,820 3,859,08
Pork. . . . .barrels 2 . . . . . . . . . . 3 28 3 3 1 3,021 3,518 141 137 6,857
". . . . .casks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Potatoes. . . . .sacks 80 36 58 2 20 4 4 . . . . . . . . . . 18 25 15 202
". . . . .barrels 10 51 4 58 4 5 12 . . . . . 374 2,307 86 20 3,013
Rice. . . . .tierces 38 26 37 56 78 135 156 . . . . . 374 2,307 86 20 3,013
Rope. . . . .coils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 419 721 1,079 153 2,372
Seed, Grass. . . . .sacks . . . . . 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 1 1 6 15 14 9 71
Tobacco. . . . .boxes 346 464 974 416 170 701 119 10 33 220 224 378 4,055
". . . . .packages 12 123 . . . . . 16 7 159 163 1 35 1 . . . . . 58 574
". . . . .hogsheads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 417 439 3 . . . . . 869
Tea. . . . .packages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Whisky. . . . .barrels 8 5 20 13 1 3 37 1 72 291 934 55 1,440
Wheat. . . . .sacks . . . . . 5 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 1,950 2,031 3,989
Wool. . . . .bales 3 . . . . . 2 . . . . . 4 1 . . . . . . . . . . 2 1 . . . . . . . . . . 13


Page 24

        

RECEIPTS--MEMPHIS AND OHIO RAILROAD.

ARTICLES. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN. FEB. MAR. APRIL. MAY. JUNE. JULY. AUG. TOTAL.
Agricultural Implements. . . . . No. 6 26 5 2 24 . . . . . . . . . . 14 2 1 1 . . . . . 81
Apples. . . . .barrels 62 51 24 1 4 1 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 36 264
Beef. . . . .barrels . . . . . 8 4 43 8 40 8 . . . . . . . . . . 7 15 2 135
Butter. . . . .firkins and kegs 23 19 17 25 16 14 3 6 111 48 80 46 408
Bacon. . . . .casks and tierces . . . . . 1 2 3 . . . . . 4 2 1 9 84 158 56 320
Cotton. . . . .bales 4,826 15,837 11,762 3,336 12,502 2,168 951 823 88 16 2 . . . . . 52,316
Corn. . . . .sacks 29 266 179 125 115 34 179 235 35 1 15 51 1,264
Cotton Seed. . . . .sacks 15 14 2,051 87 97 88 54 1,055 114 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,675
Dry Goods. . . . .packages 23 25 27 22 6 47 23 11 89 116 78 34 501
Dried Fruit. . . . .sacks 154 172 301 842 344 245 125 55 79 43 25 . . . . . 2,385
". . . . .barrels 4 19 . . . . . 95 81 7 6 7 . . . . . 1 12 . . . . . 235
Eggs. . . . .boxes 69 49 37 61 61 100 70 85 85 94 101 50 862
". . . . .barrels 20 1 . . . . . 3 . . . . . 8 35 40 15 13 13 9 157
Flour. . . . .sacks 21 5 2 10 1 10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 72 245 376
". . . . .barrels 37 12 1 2 3 18 33 21 30 3,472 856 5,300 9,785
Hides. . . . .No. 45 40 647 562 554 1,172 581 278 112 32 18 12 4,053
Lard. . . . .packages . . . . . 2 1 2 11 2 5 1 18 3 199 1 245
Leather. . . . .bundles and boxes 1 20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2 52 115 158 344 695
Lumber. . . . .feet 154,614 107,200 213,787 44,000 36,000 . . . . . 4,000 347,400 19,000 14,700 25,000 14,000 975,701
Live Stock. . . . .head 358 101 122 112 504 48 106 205 153 104 66 180 2,059
Merchandise. . . . .pounds 60,203 24,697 88,011 45,875 55,183 53,768 46,774 45,077 153,948 138,340 95,706 94,800 882,382
Oats. . . . .sacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 15 33
Pork. . . . .barrels 2 . . . . . . . . . . 8 2 11 . . . . . 1 . . . . . 181 . . . . . 1 206
Potatoes. . . . .sacks 42 79 33 34 6 30 147 57 . . . . . 3 17 86 534
Tobacco. . . . .hogsheads 58 61 56 72 195 289 140 179 126 143 38 55 1,415
". . . . .boxes 254 526 329 437 99 215 58 35 70 69 28 18 2 138
Wheat. . . . .sacks 1 71 100 . . . . . . . . . . 19 17 . . . . . . . . . . 471 9,979 6,597 17,255
Whisky. . . . .barrels 6 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 . . . . . 16 10 590 379 1,094 2 101

        

RECEIPTS--MISSISSIPPI AND TENNESSEE RAILROAD.

ARTICLES. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN. FEB. MAR. APRIL. MAY. JUNE. JULY. AUG. TOTAL.
Agricultural Implements. . . . . No. . . . . . . . . . . 13 5 1 1 . . . . . 1 3 12 . . . . . . . . . . 36
Butter. . . . .firkins and kegs 10 3 5 1 2 5 2 . . . . . 5 31 . . . . . 2 66
Cotton. . . . .bales 5,756 15,483 11,290 6,330 14,568 3,420 840 549 50 10 2 5 58,303
Corn. . . . .sacks 45 40 137 91 8 25 15 655 160 145 453 20 1,794
Cotton Seed. . . . .sacks 500 . . . . . 20 77 18 60 224 65 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 964
Dried Fruit. . . . .sacks 8 67 53 13 22 19 . . . . . 1 7 1 . . . . . 4 195
". . . . .barrels 3 1 3 3 6 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Hides. . . . .No. 54 13 374 413 511 589 211 148 127 35 . . . . . . . . . . 2,601
Live Stock. . . . .head 13 11 10 11 2 2 . . . . . 2 4 5 49 16 125
Lumber. . . . .feet . . . . . 31,233 46,300 2,730 . . . . . 3,600 2 200 139,000 1,000 . . . . . 5,000 . . . . . 199 830
Merchandise. . . . .pounds 35,489 . . . . . 33,292 69,285 45,470 36,030 41,648 43,869 29,497 33,662 47,472 46,400 493,347
Potatoes. . . . .sacks 4 6 85 62 3 . . . . . 13 4 . . . . . . . . . . 1 5 178
Wheat. . . . .sacks . . . . . 56 31 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186 . . . . . 589 2,274 955 4,091
Wool. . . . .bales 10 3 1 2 1 1 . . . . . . . . . . 15 3 13 1 50


Page 25

        

MEMPHIS AND CHARLESTON RAILROAD.
SHIPMENTS.

ARTICLES. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN. FEB. MAR. APRIL. MAY. JUNE. JULY. AUG. TOTAL.
Apples. . . . .barrels 17 224 413 846 368 624 319 229 21 2 2  3,065
Agricultural Implements. . . . . No. 27 58 163 318 714 809 437 112 31 20 12 4 2,705
Bagging. . . . .pieces 1,680 1,310 226 340 284 72 251 200 48 437 556 735 6,139
Boots and Shoes. . . . .cases 264 283 82 73 34 43 255 178 25 21 29 59 1,346
Beef. . . . .barrels 38 40 13 33 53 25 50 34 13 315 41 1 656
Bacon. . . . .casks 475 626 255 134 262 173 649 649 1,236 115 140 155 4,869
". . . . .tierces 91 112 75 32 60 30 150 198 142 27 59 25 1 002
Cotton. . . . .bales  1,908 861 3,263 3,140 4,891 730 227 1,321 199 282 407 17,229
Corn. . . . .sacks 12,551 24,356 20,277 9,011 7,769 10,527 57,433 60,577 24,084 5,479 4,112 1,614 237,790
Coffee. . . . .sacks 523 902 796 1,711 1,845 1,880 1,148 974 3,913 1,866 739 171 16,848
Coal. . . . .bushels 108,664 24,166 4,745 4,230 4,893 2,942 33,727 9,475 440 40 1,710 370 195,402
Dry Goods. . . . .packages 485 187 57 90 94 307 172 77 42 29 44 32 1,676
Drugs. . . . .packages 127 201 131 191 212 334 482 242 53 41 21 23 2,058
Flour. . . . .sacks 1,128 546 581 509 439 176 112 189 9 6 75 11 3,781
". . . . .barrels 5,344 5,879 2,971 3,684 3,168 5,048 6,006 5,245 3 074 436 809 91 41,755
Furniture. . . . .packages 857 869 507 1,252 951 1,058 522 255 477 230 360 50 7 388
Hay. . . . .bales 113 141 99 226 172 347 734 927 437 189 31  3,416
Hides. . . . .No. 999 123 1 66 178 285 826 361 2,905 2,989 2,655 1,435 12,823
Hardware. . . . .packages 404 116 55 172 367 902 338 115 32 8 16 11 2,536
Ice. . . . .casks 105 31 1 8   102 6 31 90 115 78 567
Lard. . . . .packages 307 511 811 210 217 317 753 599 444 69 72 296 4,606
Lead. . . . .bundles and kegs 80 143 81 78 79 56 355 523 68 19 36 191 1,709
Lime. . . . .barrels 1,648 1,496 899 737 768 318 1,759 1,637 282 371 137 60 10,112
Lumber. . . . .feet 33,182 25,157 52,165 18,490 32,986 30,925 38,214 63,124 14,900 9,040 9,000 4 500 361,683
Molasses. . . . .barrels 205 385 535 972 1,431 901 1,055 963 301 358 475 743 8,324
Nails. . . . .kegs 371 675 477 796 828 1,355 791 977 64 97 128 142 6 701
Oats. . . . .sacks 1,817 2,708 1,255 473 2,008 5,190 2,107 938 121 5 2 1 15,625
Pork. . . . .barrels 142 179 124 136 571 845 700 920 409 87 68 132 4,313
". . . . .casks 4   82 228 361 487 217 85    1,464
". . . . .bulk 10,000   6,000   172,600 17 300     205,900
Potatoes. . . . .sacks 209 659 302 241 38 17 229 271 33 6 6 10 2,031
". . . . .barrels 604 359 346 484 1,072 3,673 2,332 1,570 180 18 8  10,646
Powder. . . . .kegs 116 93 78 221 257 136 212 371 1,367 826 6 2 3,685
Rice. . . . .tierces 19 17 123 71 36 37 84 103 19 35 17 10 571
Rope. . . . .coils 2,509 2,331 1,276 460 312 195 196 85 719 2,012 285 370 10,150
Sugar. . . . .hogsheads 40 188 74 154 237 306 144 150 363 548 888 1,165 4,277
". . . . .barrels 327 607 357 917 752 705 496 450 205 224 557 598 6,185
". . . . .boxes 24 17 25 15 11 8 72 73 45 49 137 58 534
Salt. . . . .sacks 1,433 4,964 4,857 5,516 6,621 1,820 851 682 973 33,477 2,006 2,140 35,210
Tobacco. . . . .hogsheads     27  10 24   243 2 306
". . . . .boxes 350 513 369 219 234 446 599 582 184 139 177 74 3,886
". . . . .packages 70 86 46 44 772 166 166 25 33 41 50 14 818
Wheat. . . . .sacks 6,167 5,428 2,849 235 10 26 141 65   15 30 14,966
Whisky. . . . .barrels 1,199 1,240 1,144 1,034 1,325 1,326 1,232 1,588 411 250 203 117 11,069
Wool. . . . .bales                 782 145 209 68 1,203


Page 26

        

MEMPHIS AND OHIO RAILROAD.
SHIPMENTS.

ARTICLES. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN. FEB. MAR. APRIL. MAY. JUNE. JULY. AUG. TOTAL.
Agricultural Implements. . . . . No. 26 25 37 27 24 257 72 47 25 11 8 3 562
Bagging. . . . .pieces 991 608 269 89 115 16 1 1 7 34 382 127 2,640
Boots and Shoes. . . . .cases 543 122 97 23 16 4 84 164 5 32 30 14 1,134
Beef. . . . .barrels 8 16 . . . . . 1 20 22 7 12 4 2 1 1 94
Bacon. . . . .casks 135 53 27 11 24 5 10 41 42 98 22 9 477
". . . . .tierces 156 96 99 16 2 4 15 38 26 10 21 19 502
Cotton. . . . .bales 42 . . . . . 87 6 34 50 194 12 . . . . . 48 13 80 566
Corn. . . . .sacks 115 133 64 209 358 92 532 501 211 160 14 91 2,440
Cotton Seed. . . . . " . . . . . 1 2 . . . . . 21 31 116 36 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
Cotton Gins. . . . .No. 7 2 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 12
Cement and Plaster. . . . .barrels 46 51 39 26 22 22 13 36 9 6 25 15 300
Cheese. . . . .boxes 88 279 482 289 276 133 83 59 . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . . . 1,670
Coffee. . . . .sacks 548 251 482 414 940 352 274 255 181 202 155 334 4,388
Coal. . . . .bushels 1,630 480 1,830 240 1,285 445 677 237 80 160 160 180 7,404
Dry Goods. . . . .packages 1,497 465 519 204 384 239 542 875 121 185 214 161 5,406
Drugs. . . . ." 123 48 86 56 92 116 146 147 46 26 33 31 950
Flour. . . . .sacks 60 2 . . . . . 7 41 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
". . . . .barrels 246 314 539 350 751 513 374 482 258 355 432 110 4,724
Fish. . . . .packages 57 55 99 60 74 74 65 107 36 10 4 2 643
Furniture. . . . ." 158 185 362 404 528 267 262 244 85 84 162 61 2,802
Hardware. . . . ." 409 79 142 59 274 146 206 126 55 17 8 7 1,628
Hay. . . . .bales 41 14 3 . . . . . 50 39 49 275 39 . . . . . 15 15 560
Hides. . . . .No. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,829 1,164 2,061 5 054
Lard. . . . .packages 96 106 69 19 37 29 55 80 22 12 14 11 552
Lime. . . . .barrels 407 451 574 279 245 114 210 119 62 32 7 25 2 525
Lumber. . . . .feet 14,250 19,768 58 955 14,245 13,450 6,000 12,905 63,770 2,500 4,000 5 300 1,500 216,645
Molasses. . . . .barrels 67 117 355 303 894 477 316 236 364 123 232 88 3 572
Nails. . . . .kegs 442 216 352 171 513 288 296 218 38 35 75 93 2,787
Oats. . . . .sacks 42 39 65 26 726 797 382 62 18 1 . . . . . . . . . . 2,158
Pork. . . . .barrels 77 30 39 34 136 220 144 207 75 161 404 23 1,550
". . . . .casks 5 . . . . . 12 . . . . . 33 67 51 25 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
Potatoes. . . . .sacks 3 . . . . . 23 16 . . . . . . . . . . 29 42 13 16 . . . . . . . . . . 142
". . . . .barrels 197 22 95 60 196 543 496 225 23 18 . . . . . . . . . . 1 874
Rice. . . . .tierces 12 11 32 20 32 25 8 39 10 62 27 8 1 286
Rope. . . . .coils 1,218 592 320 122 118 41 28 14 13 14 34 107 2,607
Sugar. . . . .barrels 286 235 387 382 165 243 217 236 90 124 164 131 2,660
". . . . .boxes 16 10 7 1 . . . . . 3 1 . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . . . 39
". . . . .hogsheads 18 17 28 44 69 40 13 21 13 65 117 168 613
Salt. . . . .sacks 2,110 2,090 2,444 1,924 3,292 387 118 190 494 2,393 2,101 1,137 18,680
Seed, Grass. . . . . 11 38 63 22 63 121 75 20 35 10 1 . . . . . 454
Tobacco. . . . .boxes and packages 181 183 275 166 619 157 148 167 46 72 79 189 2,182
Wheat. . . . .sacks 136 26 66 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 . . . . . . . . . . 20 . . . . . 414
Whisky. . . . .barrels 500 440 603 426 501 332 245 244 226 134 45 97 3,700


Page 27

        

MISSISSIPPI AND TENNESSEE RAILROAD.
SHIPMENTS.

ARTICLES. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN. FEB. MAR. APRIL. MAY. JUNE. JULY. AUG. TOTAL.
Apples. . . . .barrels 2 29 128 258 196 203 51 62 1       930
Agricultural Implements. . . . . No.57 111 52 110 795 182 116 38 57 47 14 18 1,597
Bagging. . . . .pieces 907 764 504 271 260 82 18 14 43 57 248 172 3,340
Boots and Shoes. . . . .cases 362 243 53 23 22 16 37 82 8 4 21 17 888
Beef. . . . .barrels 30 66 5 9 89 119 43 37 17 7 1   432
Bacon. . . . .casks 108 123 72 38 147 146 31 128 100 29 31 35 903
". . . . .tierces 226 288 156 142 140 142 9 57 128 62 103 63 1,516
Corn. . . . .sacks 740 412 152   288 1,913 480 1,330 1,228 770 1,010 341 8,664
Coffee. . . . .sacks 169 300 236 333 752 608 117 124 86 61 87 35 2,908
Coal. . . . .bushels 4 256 245 492 680 401 187 190 1 20 251 100 2 827
Dry Goods. . . . .packages 1,501 537 136 420 707 715 18 115 232 144 219 171 4,815
Drugs. . . . .packages 93 64 26 36 244 448 53 115 26 15 31   1,151
Flour. . . . .sacks 2 3 7 53 3 66 6 67 19 1 151 77 455
". . . . .barrels 662 651 577 845 1,299 1,649 389 781 496 161 318 322 8,160
Furniture. . . . .packages 676 278 314 575 1,586 832 3 131 197 69 114 65 4,740
Hardware. . . . .packages 2,377 1,035 369 1,246 940 931 14 74 340 135 202 236 7,899
Ice. . . . .casks 12               6 15 28 6 67
Lard. . . . .packages 105 107 95 72 249 172 37 132 70 48 36 21 1,144
Lead. . . . .bundles and kegs 69 37 40 46 23 73 21 101 19 38 22 13 502
Lime. . . . .barrels 255 544 341 266 539 267 71 132 56 175 87 51 2,784
Lumber. . . . .feet 38,824 25,611 18,836 167,770 175,582 101,517 15,672 18,700 12 016 4,350 8,870 34,800 452,548
Molasses. . . . .barrels 69 141 120 206 714 741 74 124 109 90 120 67 3,275
Nails. . . . .kegs 212 151 152 184 459 566 58 239 40 20 95 74 2,250
Oats. . . . .sacks 29 43 14 90 917 2,894 101 123   3   1 4,215
Pork. . . . .barrels 169 180 111 108 744 599 208 140 252 100 91 175 2 877
". . . . .casks 11 5 24 11 229 395 85 71         831
". . . . .bulk           4,000 7,000 12,000         23,000
Potatoes. . . . .sacks 4 55 50 24 22 35 6 12 13 11 3   235
". . . . .barrels 72 148 74 89 444 1 514 179 231 45 21 6   2,823
Powder. . . . .kegs 26 21 64 50 69 45 10 75 2   6   368
Rice. . . . .tierces 7 18 27 48 90 36 18 31 22 12 15 24 347
Rope. . . . .coils 587 692 296 168 184 143 14 21 4 72 182 178 2,531
Sugar. . . . . hogsheads 13 10 3 11 19 5 5 10 1 1 6 7 91
". . . . .barrels 142 185 157 165 452 429 76 286 66 67 113 77 2,215
". . . . .boxes 74 77 68 233 342 382 26 38 48 30 61 42 1,421
Salt. . . . .sacks 580 842 1,064 1,009 2,146 1,569 49 134 267 288 360 450 8,757
Tobacco. . . . .boxes and packages 297 129 125 172 363 378 101 188 68 53 121 56 2,041
Whisky. . . . .barrels 249 266 181 242 513 531 110 349 133 57 103 82 1 498
Wheat. . . . .sacks 52 75 232 587 486     11 1     55 2,816


Page 28

        

RECEIPTS OF LEADING ARTICLES BY RIVER,
For the Year ending August 31, 1861.

ARTICLES. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN. FEB. MAR. APRIL. MAY. JUNE. JULY. AUG. TOTAL.
Apples. . . . .barrels 399 5,569 3 854 3,167 3,396 122 1,358 625 236 28 938 937 19,256
Ale, Beer, etc. . . . . packages 904 2,231 2 369 2 031 1 259 2,193 2,556 2,973 1,208 99 732 247 18,792
Agricultural Implements. . . . . No. 1,882 732 1,222 1,131 3,645 1,809 1,015 120 41 1 1   11,699
Bran and Shorts. . . . .sacks 2,665 830 1,597 386 99 422 2,278 1,895 88 29 162   10,451
Beans. . . . . sacks 196 2 86 27 54 7 88 34 1,821 1     2,316
". . . . .barrels 4 63 80 21 93 85 27 7 355 1     736
Boots and Shoes. . . . .cases 491 607 173 27 77 172 681 607 315 40 6 45 3,241
Butter. . . . .firkins and kegs 464 1,506 721 457 412 276 367 529 580 30 232 161 5,935
". . . . .barrels   161 274 177 214 162 100 70 5 261 30   1,454
Beef. . . . .barrels 57 397 537 475 475 307 100 91 306   15 49 2,809
Bacon. . . . .casks 1 127 999 375 288 581 589 1,362 1,485 1,884 68 30 66 8,856
". . . . .tierces 121 189 91 36 91 75 263 461 88   6 2 1,423
". . . . .packages 48   351 142 234 240 199 1,251 398 281 189   3,233
Cotton. . . . .bales 1,094 7,099 9,540 17,616 13,830 11,675 3,480 1,287 561 454 338 504 67,478
Cotton Yarn. . . . .bales 29 35 83 1 1   50 298 22 18 1   538
Cotton Seed. . . . .sacks 19,371 14 088 24,785 21,792 11,496 12,343 13,285 24,708 15,378 3,398 5,142 4,033 169,819
Cotton Gins. . . . .No. 44 36 7 8 5 2 6 5 5 9 13 19 159
Cattle. . . . .head 252 628 700 495 485 601 575 495 261 701 711 1,044 6,948
Crockery. . . . . bhds and crates 121 47 57 3 14 90 40 38 104 10 1 46 571
Corn. . . . .sacks 16,726 23,673 33,547 23,204 17,707 53,001 99,412 33,519 23,795 23,216 16,000 8,560 372,360
Clover Seed. . . . .sacks     1 8 151 174 199 25         13,266
Cement and Plaster. . . . .barrels 1 963 3 329 2,072 879 1,462 1,140 1,038 2,234 149       13 266
Cheese. . . . .boxes 1,254 5,800 5 240 1,587 1 249 903 1,185 202 80 13   18 1,300
Coal. . . . .bushels     200,800 140,830 140,000     226,105 345,000 13,000     1,065 725
Coffee. . . . .sacks 1,174 2,362 1.650 2,588 4,435 4 364 1,925 1,636 3,568 2,605 1,410 821 28,538
Dry Goods. . . . .packages 7,546 2,110 1,194 904 356 1,906 3,845 2,886 168 117 49 52 21,133
Dried Fruit. . . . .sacks   29 418 113 489 146   38 30 19 18   1,300
". . . . .barrels   7 4   12 66 5 7   5 48   154
Drugs. . . . .packages 994 671 278 573 109 320 528 491 205 92 39 35 4,335
Eggs. . . . .boxes 117 37 6 47 15 33 121 18 92 20 34 10 550
". . . . .barrels 249 406 510 268 186 258 521 687 169 25 20 6 3,305
Flour. . . . .sacks 940 1,465 1 978 605 537 427 381 1,482 396   404 282 8,897
". . . . .barrels 14,511 14,498 10,711 15,705 15 108 14,444 20,647 8,658 9,419 293 144 57 124,195
Fish. . . . .packages 752 861 2,550 2,578 3,756 1,259 712 486 129 53 152 9 13,297
Furniture. . . . .packages 2,037 4,115 5,077 3,444 4,570 4,464 3,465 2,228 160 19 2   29,581
Gunnies. . . . .bales 123 60 82 91 13 25 111 7 84 38 28 148 810
Glass. . . . .packages 171 573 2,122 769 1,445 1,069 1,409 477 63   20   8 058
Glassware. . . . .packages 829 727 643 558 360 1,019 1,648 562 97   10   6,441
Hay. . . . .bales 1,347 4,093 5,178 5,662 2,251 2,374 3,521 3,388 2,723 46 435 1,282 32,320
Hides. . . . .No. 494 470 581 510 2,028 6,144 4,542 4,219 3,278 3,437 1,675 4,200 31,458
Hogs. . . . .head 20 308 484 610 1,490 462 225 222 120 16     3,957
Hats. . . . .packages 168 126 36 1 1 5 160 389     3 112 1,001
Horses. . . . .head 130 202 110 170 121 125 136 102 70 8 20   1,348
Hardware. . . . .packages 1 900 1,303 1,067 801 850 3,399 441 312 202 21     10,196
Ice. . . . .tons 1,214   51 10 20 46 7,925 4,500 6,500       19,654


Page 29

        

[RECEIPTS OF LEADING ARTICLES BY RIVER,
For the Year ending August 31, 1861., cont'd.]

ARTICLES. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN. FEB. MAR. APRIL. MAY. JUNE. JULY. AUG. TOTAL.
Lemons. . . . . boxes 85 23 121 3 20 114 198 328 15 413 146   1,479
Lime. . . . .barrels 11,368 6 884 12,701 6,020 1,253 6,646 4,735 4,365 4,249 18,000 397   60,418
Lard. . . . .tierces and packages 653 132 167 173 195 856 492 324 240   59 237 3,028
". . . . .kegs 237 693 1,010 938 982 1,794 1,101 944 192   131   8,022
Lead. . . . .bundles and kegs 119 400 81 531 89 390 510 1,036 1,587 1,744 147   6,634
Liquors. . . . .packages 1,335 2,160 2,661 771 865 1,043 888 1,279 121 19 242 408 11,792
Leather. . . . .bundles and boxes 216 239 185 93 107 217 198 218 24 86 30   1,662
Lumber. . . . .feet 23,394 272,175 100,000 819,100 1,930,108 577,861 2 428,050 80,800 1 343,000 2 544,485 100,000   10,218,973
Molasses. . . . .barrels 227 638 1,888 2,791 3,337 3,401 2,303 1,581 514 354 898 1,127 19,059
Nails. . . . .kegs 2,793 2,044 3,576 1 085 2,198 3,389 3,021 1,804 50 14     20 174
Oats. . . . .sacks 3,956 7,826 6,255 3,098 2,312 8,488 9,865 1,038 582   275 20 43,115
Onions. . . . .sacks 2,452 2,379 2,810   42 1 372 70 230   7   8,363
". . . . .barrels 403 282 146 2 93 147 104       1   1,178
Oranges. . . . .boxes   30 265 569 351 313 749 1,371 240 93 1   3,987
Oil. . . . .barrels 235 282 251 102 180 281 450 380 118 98 61   2 438
Pork. . . . .barrels 339 591 451 496 2,368 3,068 3 078 1,919 1,536 2 8   13,856
". . . . .casks       113 499 888 553 151 1       2,205
". . . . .lbs. bulk   43 000   351 372 90,000 567,020 214,600 249,000 53,600       1,486,592
Potatoes. . . . .sacks 1 955 7,859 9,529 262 218 781 3,795 1,116 1,857 51 119 753 28,395
". . . . .barrels 3,122 2,605 2,001 6,700 6,499 3,118 3,797 443 321 38 26 15 28,885
Powder. . . . .kegs 13 167 501 30 665 240 1,869 31 729 611 20   4,876
Rice. . . . .tierces 7   19 10 11 3 46 2 2 50 26 43 212
Rope. . . . .coils 2,895 4 075 935 694 1,385 275 246 2,257 5,342 128 74   18,306
Sugar. . . . . hogsheads 222 45 580 883 1,526 971 496 375 386 492 1,370 2,444 10,190
". . . . .barrels 420 1 093 672 252 544 623 504 546 1,351 46 163 583 7,877
Salt. . . . .sacks 3,078 12,709 11,494 12,620 5,530 6,541 1,291 1,099 5,026 6,659 16,032 3,800 85,869
Seed, Grass. . . . .sacks 252 152 45 74 138 325 389 148 106 4 9   1,642
Stoves. . . . .No. 576 1 533 1,229 454 321 313 107 269 119       4,921
Sheep. . . . .head 498 200 102 240 110 200 100 460 108 17 270   2,135
Shot. . . . .bags 103 217 884 1,014 216 1,374 523 1,742 365 75     6,513
Soap. . . . .boxes 262 328 552 197 152 596 236 115 689 58   49 2,934
Tobacco. . . . .hogsheads 4 18 4 61   2 17 43 375 78 31 13 642
" . . . . . boxes1,3001,2471937241864343306201203  3,857
". . . . .packages 425 470 1,624 113 65 193 126 625 36 1     3,678
Tea. . . . .packages 171 31 138 57 12 107 29 71 8 16 34 111 785
Wheat. . . . .sacks 7,683 6,802 1,010 686 856 90 1,192 434   273 17,014 9,583 46,123
Whisky. . . . .barrels 2,325 3,102 3 915 4,304 3,483 1,992 4,201 4,098 511 86     27,692
Wool. . . . .bales 115 369     14 2 4 42 794 150 219 116 1,825
White Lead. . . . .kegs 163 44 191 117 22 456 437 1,459 15   129 62 3,086
Wine. . . . .packages 577 690 1,074 360 280 512 382 681 285 553 407 514 6,315


Page 30

        

SHIPMENTS OF LEADING ARTICLES BY RIVER,
For the Year ending August 31, 1861.

ARTICLES. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN. FEB. MAR. APRIL. MAY. JUNE. JULY. AUG. TOTAL.
Apples. . . . .barrels 562 466 824 508 549 274 305 106 178 38 628 1,544 5,982
Alcohol. . . . . barrels 14 18 9 16 3 2 23 14 8 91 15 172 457
Ale, Beer, and Porter. . . . . pk'gs 76 74 53 85 106 100 266 302 109 21 77 123 1,392
Agricultural Implements. . . . . No. 470 123 86 954 268 2,217 1,315 1,0420 210 61 2 10 6,758
Beans. . . . . barrels . . . . . 7 36 39 63 52 98 34 331 7 . . . . . . . . . . 667
Bagging. . . . .pieces 1,139 899 383 222 848 263 430 112 169 968 1,298 525 7,256
Beef. . . . .barrels 74 284 173 165 355 386 328 257 58 51 53 2 2,186
Bacon. . . . .casks 402 316 91 36 150 214 216 276 587 369 148 167 2,972
". . . . .tierces 141 153 27 13 32 80 138 242 232 1,628 115 155 2,959
Boots and Shoes. . . . .cases 628 591 142 95 144 91 531 728 213 51 63 4 3,281
Cotton. . . . .bales 11 636 68,610 47,609 47 838 61,235 63,305 37,254 11 809 2,559 119 78 10 352,062
Cotton Yarn. . . . .bales 212 293 78 82 55 70 291 195 13 40 26 52 1,407
Cotton Seed. . . . .sacks 2,235 1,864 6,855 4,162 7,121 2,302 941 3,372 646 . . . . . . . . . . 10 29,538
Cotton Gins. . . . .No. 29 29 15 9 16 6 13 26 7 12 17 4 183
Cattle. . . . .head 1 30 35 39 108 3 70 55 2 16 5 . . . . . 364
Crockery. . . . . hhds and crates 57 54 4 12 16 21 37 105 16 6 . . . . . 1 327
Corn. . . . .sacks 509 478 150 1,546 2,867 2,461 7,231 3,840 9,135 18,677 10,345 10,470 67,709
Cement and Plaster. . . . .barrels 440 364 435 332 375 222 267 251 155 69 85 90 3,085
Cheese. . . . .boxes 86 231 454 325 678 289 338 256 56 5 10 . . . . . 2,728
Coal. . . . .bushels 1,250 4,265 1,411 3,740 3,306 5 835 4,984 6,046 1,000 3 327 1,787 5,000 36,951
Coffee. . . . .sacks 195 253 363 1 916 712 852 664 528 331 233 193 346 5,676
Cotton Seed Oil Cake. . . . . tons 206 92 133 128 433 1 86 11 . . . . . . . . . . 4 . . . . . 1,094
Dry Goods. . . . .packages 2,040 679 638 231 691 357 1,313 1,955 571 246 112 218 9,053
Dried Fruit. . . . .sacks 502 580 2,728 913 953 1,479 367 223 165 5 18 32 5,965
". . . . .barrels 21 4 6 30 111 79 19 13 29 2 11 40 365
Drugs. . . . .packages 181 510 104 55 204 230 985 408 173 541 82 106 3,589
Flour. . . . .sacks 37 7 12 166 516 402 49 71 52 55 494 2,996 4 867
". . . . .barrels 2,335 2,111 2,019 1,603 2,024 3,034 4,721 2,795 3,727 9,568 3,978 14,112 52,129
Fish. . . . .packages 18 43 24 58 24 32 57 88 27 11 11 2 395
Furniture. . . . .packages 722 1,457 1,593 1,456 2 357 1,558 2,390 1,720 409 684 750 137 15,227
Gunny Cloth. . . . .bales and rolls . . . . . 1 29 . . . . . . . . . . 2 121 7 7 106 13 11 277
Gunnies. . . . .bales 68 201 878 77 132 20 37 75 63 103 68 30 1,752
Glassware. . . . .packages 47 30 119 77 16 78 132 162 57 149 7 3 877
Glass. . . . .boxes 87 105 155 114 208 108 249 284 35 38 51 11 1,445
Hay. . . . .bales 54 107 119 175 144 620 1,163 526 255 138 550 197 4 048
Hides. . . . .No. 762 815 2,936 3 366 3,147 10,407 7,390 4,498 738 50 75 . . . . . 34,184
Hogs. . . . .head . . . . . 13 . . . . . . . . . . 22 28 34 149 542 70 500 . . . . . 1,358
Horses. . . . .No. 104 243 94 44 91 66 144 118 44 39 122 8 1,117
Hats. . . . .cases 182 53 18 3 2 22 171 157 24 10 6 4 652
Hardware. . . . .packages 169 348 418 218 410 317 915 517 181 220 252 31 4 007
Ice. . . . .casks 109 4 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 184 93 234 391 142 1,199
Iron and Steel. . . . .tons 14 15 107 3 350 43 196 29 22 135 13 10 937
Lard. . . . .packages 236 410 93 84 122 103 419 221 310 106 61 57 2,186
Leather. . . . .bundles and boxes 78 214 14 8 52 86 289 112 162 436 510 243 2,201
Lead. . . . .kegs 73 66 38 19 5 22 105 178 10 16 28 529 1,016
Lead. . . . . bundles 261 12 8 17 44 18 97 38 18 17 191 . . . . . 721


Page 31

        

[SHIPMENTS OF LEADING ARTICLES BY RIVER,
For the Year ending August 31, 1861., cont'd.]

ARTICLES. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN. FEB. MAR. APRIL. MAY. JUNE. JULY. AUG. TOTAL.
Lime. . . . .barrels 370 1,146 1,175 481 865 458 1,475 1,247 231 168 125 106 7,847
Liquors. . . . .packages 314 151 141 233 152 108 353 466 192 131 63 41 2,345
Lumber. . . . .feet 68,200 51,710 98,395 71,500 100,290 90,211 103,556 36 431 17,100 32,620 21,0 [ ] 0 9,900 710,913
Molasses. . . . .barrels 3 156 120 130 1,102 631 525 350 271 243 157 39 3,859
Nails. . . . .kegs 488 419 306 257 58 1,864 1,205 1,171 505 186 297 232 6 988
Oats. . . . .sacks 37 2,410 46 101 493 1,029 894 727 1,141 87 198 25 7 188
Onions. . . . .sacks 42 192 201 54 346 175 83 17 24 1 . . . . . 15 1,150
". . . . .barrels 124 55 30 191 325 188 70 11 88 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,082
Oil, Linseed. . . . .barrels 5 17 18 . . . . . 9 21 57 139 75 86 165 20 612
Oil, Cotton Seed. . . . .barrels 343 88 170 442 261 96 235 241 10 157 . . . . . . . . . . 2,043
Pork. . . . .barrels 613 935 378 154 507 929 926 1,439 1,634 2,512 1,053 205 11,285
". . . . .casks 37 4 28 7 104 207 198 1,764 26 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,375
Potatoes. . . . .sacks 180 465 382 76 538 21 369 185 344 23 11 289 2,883
Potatoes. . . . .barrels 613 297 620 153 279 1,939 3,233 40 655 110 22 159 8,620
Powder. . . . .kegs 50 87 52 41 129 85 169 2,015 79 64 23 1 2,895
Rice. . . . .tierces 15 5 4 . . . . . 106 97 49 46 249 1 520 269 32 2,392
Rope. . . . .coils 1,558 771 431 139 196 280 299 220 800 596 406 278 6,004
Sugar. . . . . hogsheads 4 3 2 1 270 34 82 15 48 316 91 85 951
". . . . .barrels 137 82 148 119 342 423 275 217 1,149 143 107 51 3,193
". . . . .boxes 18 39 46 12 1 37 35 9 7 20 26 8 258
Soap. . . . .boxes 347 167 197 121 184 292 288 307 60 468 216 519 3,161
Salt. . . . .sacks 148 265 1,283 423 1,271 476 742 653 240 1,878 1,394 298 9,276
Seed, Grass. . . . .sacks 29 14 55 . . . . . 29 190 300 152 67 13 14 5 868
Stoves. . . . .No. 69 44 80 63 70 78 97 139 31 22 11 4 708
Sheep. . . . .head 10 11 . . . . . 6 . . . . . 5 1 . . . . . 2 . . . . . 4 103 142
Shot. . . . .bags 172 118 176 70 167 84 287 372 39 61 28 51 1,625
Tobacco. . . . .hogsheads 107 47 46 52 110 244 289 208 697 723 100 31 2,654
". . . . . boxes 818 900 483 366 582 664 710 786 1,140 402 133 487 7,471
". . . . .packages 111 391 57 156 166 294 127 114 20 18 23 19 1,494
Tea. . . . .packages 13 3 8 . . . . . 22 7 43 52 18 4 5 30 205
Turpentine. . . . . 5 3 3 . . . . . 32 2 16 5 3 4 164 . . . . . 238
Wheat. . . . .sacks 221 51 16 3 3 3 27 6 . . . . . . . . . . 894 6 552 7,776
Whisky. . . . .barrels 354 590 421 624 904 1,515 1,645 1,906 321 429 866 495 10,070
Wool. . . . .bales . . . . . 8 105 . . . . . . . . . . 44 1 1 2 1 1 1 164
White Lead. . . . .kegs 57 20 41 . . . . . 57 62 240 257 70 114 49 10 977
Wine. . . . .barrels 19 12 5 7 3 3 33 33 2 . . . . . 9 3 129
". . . . .casks . . . . . 4 2 . . . . . 8 4 6 12 10 3 . . . . . . . . . . 49
". . . . .baskets 25 16 26 4 22 2 23 45 13 1 . . . . . . . . . . 177
". . . . .boxes 134 81 63 . . . . . 150 19 87 88 20 106 17 6 77


Page 32

WHISKY.

         The first half of the year now under review was remarkable for the general dullness which uniformly prevailed in this article, and the low prices ruling throughout --say from 7c. to 10c. below the avarage of the five preceding years. This was due in great part to the largely increased production in those sections from which Memphis was in the habit of drawing her supplies, the heavy shipments to and large stocks on hand in this market, and the general depression in financial affairs, which tended to materially restrict the speculative inquiry and confine operations to the narrow limits of a purely local trade. Hence it was that the market, which opened in September at 18 @ 20c. per gallon for common, gradually declined until January, when offerings were freely made at 14 @ 15c., and several pretty large transactions reported at 13 1/2 @ 13 3/4c. During this period, aside from the depression in prices above referred to, nothing of interest transpired in the market; but, during February and March, with the prospect of an early stoppage of supplies, holders began to exhibit more firmness, and an advance to 19 @ 20c was speedily established. Prices continued steadily to tend upward, and by the middle of June had more than doubled from the lowest point of the season, and speculators coming forward very freely, large sales were made at 35c., stocks in the meantime having been considerably reduced by army supplies and shipments South and interior-wise. From the 1st of June up to the present time, receipts have been to some extent restricted; nevertheless, the article has found its way to this city in pretty large quantities--sufficient to supply the demand and prevent any further advance in prices. The peculiar condition of the market--steadily declining until the lowest point was reached, and then as steadily advancing up to the close of the year--renders a detailed statement of prices uninteresting and unnecessary. We, therefore, dismiss this branch of our report by remarking that stocks at present are fully equal to the demand, with, however, considerable firmness among holders at the above figures.

         The usual limits of an annual exposition preclude reference to other articles of importance that are daily noted in the reports of this market. Did space permit, we should give in addition to the foregoing, facts and statistics illustrating the progress of our trade in Hardware, Crockery, Clothing, Leather, Hides, Boots, Shoes, etc.-- all of commanding interest in the general business of the city, and aggregating a very large sum.

         In conclusion, I have the pleasure of reporting the affairs of the Chamber as presenting a continued state of prosperity. The daily meetings on 'Change are well attended, and the bulk of the Grain and Produce trade of the city is at present, and has for some time past, been transacted within the Exchange Rooms. A glance at the list, published with this report, will show that a great majority of our prominent business men, in all branches of commerce, are members of the Chamber, thus evincing the importance with which its influences are regarded by the community.

Very respectfully,

JOHN S. TOOF, Secretary.

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE,
MEMPHIS, Aug. 31, 1861.

Page 33

NAMES OF MEMBERS
OF
The Memphis Chamber of Commerce.

        
NAMES OF MEMBERS. STYLE OF FIRM. STYLE OF BUSINESS AND LOCATION.
Atkinson, Q. C. . . . . Q.C. Atkinson. . . . . Broker, Bank Building, Main street.
Ashe, S. M. . . . . S.M. Ashe & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors and Commission Merchants, 47 Front Row.
Allen, W. V. . . . . . Allen & Co. . . . . . Commission Merchants, 8 Madison street.
Armstrong, J. W. . . . . . Edmondson & Armstrong. . . . . Saddle and Harness Manufacturers, 247 Main street.
Atwood, F. J. . . . . Elliot & Atwood. . . . . . Grain Dealers, 4 Exchange Building.
Adams, J. P. . . . . Fowlkes & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors and Commission Merchants, Jefferson street.
Avery, E. M. . . . . . Gayoso Savings Institution. . . . . Madison street.
Andrews, W. H. . . . . . Andrews & Glisson. . . . . Grocers, 154 Main street.
Bayliss, B. . . . . Bayliss & Guthrie. . . . . Cotton Brokers, 10 Madison street.
Bowles, Z. P. . . . . Z. P. Bowles & Co. . . . . Cotton Brokers, De Soto Block.
Bowles, Wm. . . . . Do. . . . . do . . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . do
Bryan, W. A. . . . . . Bryan & Scarbrough. . . . . Cotton Factors, 76 Front Row.
Baugh, J. V. . . . . . J. V. Baugh & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors, 88 Front Row.
Bruce, N. S. . . . . N. S. Bruce & Co. . . . . Carriage Manufacturers, 39 and 41 Monroe street.
Bruce J. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . do. . . . . do. . . . . do
Bruce, W. S. . . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . do. . . . . do. . . . . do
Beattie, J. D. . . . . . J. D.Beattie. . . . . Produce Dealer, 4 Howard's Row.
Boro, Jas. . . . . J. Boro & Co. . . . . Grocers, 42 Front Row.
Boro, Jos. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . do
Bridges, G. R. . . . . . Bridges, Marshall & Polk. . . . . Cotton Factors, 76 Front Row.
Bowen, F. F. . . . . . F. F. Bowen. . . . . Cotton Broker, 8 Monroe street.
Burnett, G. P. . . . . Burnett, Hendrix & Walker. . . . . Grocers and Commission Merchants, 165 Main street.
Brock, J. . . . . J. Brock. . . . . Baker and Flour Dealer, 8 Howard's Row.
Benham, G. W. . . . . Benham & Co. . . . . Flour Brokers, New Orleans.
Bill, C. C. . . . . . H. Fitzgerald & Co . . . . . Grocers 44 Front Row.
Bruce, G. W. . . . . J. Shelby & Co. . . . . Grocers and Commission Merchants, 102 Front Row.
Brower, D. A . . . . . Priddy & Brower. . . . . Proprietors of the Daily Argus, Second street.
Barbour, J. G. . . . . Wm. Park & Co. . . . . Hardware Dealers, 304 and 306 Main street.
Boyce, C. M. . . . . . Nelson & Boyce. . . . . Cotton Factors, 86 Front Row.
Burditt, A. P. . . . . Burditt & Choate. . . . . Produce Dealers, 322 Main street.
Borden, H. . . . . . H. Borden. . . . . Agent for Adams Southern Express Company.
Boone, O. C. . . . . O. C. Boone. . . . . Cotton Factor, De Soto Block.
Bourne, J. T. . . . . J. T. Bourne & Co. . . . . Steamboat Agents, 36 Front Row.
Babb, Benj. . . . . Harris, Hunt & Co. . . . . Cotton Brokers, 72 Front Row.
Brown, W. N. . . . . . Jones, Brown & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors and Commission Merchants, 180 Main street.
Brooks, E. W. . . . . Mackall, Brooks & Co. . . . . Grocers, 48 Front Row.
Banks, R. . . . . Moore, Halstead & Co. . . . . Planing Mill, Second Street.
Bowling, B. . . . . B. D. Nabers & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors, 48 Front Row.
Beers, J. M. . . . . J. M. Beers & Co. . . . . Produce Dealers, Batture.
Becktel, R. K. . . . . R. K. Becktel & Co. . . . . Family Grocers, 337 Main street.
Cook, D. R. . . . . Cook & Co. . . . . Grocers, 70 Front Row.
Carleton, G. N. . . . . G. N. Carleton. . . . . Furnishing Goods, 375 Main street.
Chapman, George. . . . . Addison & Chapman. . . . . Cotton Brokers, Bank Avenue.
Crook, G. W. L. . . . . G. W. L. Crook. . . . . Insurance Agent, Express Building.
Chadwick, J. E. . . . . . J. E. Chadwick. . . . . Insurance Agent, Odd Fellows' Hall.
Chiles, H. B. . . . . . with Gales & Wood. . . . . Growers and Cotton Factors, 5 Monroe street.
Churchill, L. C. . . . . L. C Churchill & Co. . . . . Produce Dealers, Exchange Building.
Cochran, M. E. . . . . . M. E. Cochran & Bro. . . . . Lumber Dealers, Batture.
Crawford, E. S. . . . . Flournoy & Crawford. . . . . Grocers, 11 Front Row.
Christian, J. R. . . . . . Planters' Oil Works. . . . . Navy Yard.
Crocker, J. W. . . . . Horton, Estes & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors, corner Front Row and Monroe street.
Cook, Charles. . . . . . Kendig & Cook. . . . . Grocers, 38 Front Row.
Carter, A. M. . . . . Norment, Wilson & Carter. . . . . Cotton Factors, corner Main and Madison streets.


Page 34

        
NAMES OF MEMBERS. STYLE OF FIRM. STYLE OF BUSINESS AND LOCATION.
Clay, J. B. . . . . Vernon, Partee & Clay. . . . . Cotton Factors And Commission Merchants, 5 Front Row.
Clay, C. C . . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . do. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . .. . do. . .. . do . . .. . do
Child, Thos. . . . . . Thomas Child. . . . . Boot and Shoe Manufacturer, 315 Main street.
Camp, S. J. . . . . S. J. Camp & Co. . . . . Furniture Dealers, Jackson Block.
Clark, E. E. . . . . E. E. Clark. . . . . Cotton Broker, 18 Front Row.
Chrisp, W. B. . . . . Morgan & Chrisp. . . . . Cotton Factors, 47 Front Row.
Cumings, A. L. . . . . A. L. Cumings. . . . . Sugar Dealer, Bradley Block.
Craig, R. G. . . . . . R.G. Craig. . . . . Seed Dealer, corner Union and Second streets.
Coronna, N. . . . . . Coronna & Co. . . . . . Produce Dealers, Exchange Building.
Church, C.B. . . . . C. B. Church. . . . . Steamboat Captain--residence Shelby street.
Costen, S.T. . . . . S. T. Costen. . . . . Builder.
Carlyle, F. Y. . . . . Carlyle & Co. . . . . Produce Dealers, 4 Union street.
Cook, J. B. . . . . Cook & Bro. . . . . Architects, Bank Building
Cook, Sydney. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . do
Cartwright, I. T. . . . . Cartwright & Co. . . . . Commission Merchants, 98 Front Row.
Cash, F M. . . . . Falls & Cash. . . . . Cotton Brokers, 72 Front Row.
Cromwell, T. A. . . . . Huls, Cromwell & Taylor. . . . . Produce dealers, 96 Front Row.
Dunscomb, S. H. Stratton, . . . . . McDavitt & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors, Jefferson Block.
Davie, P. H. . . . . . Davie & Wardlaw. . . . . Cotton Factors, 18 Front Row.
Day, J. S. . . . . Day & Proudfit . . . . . Cotton Factors and G ocers, 33 Front Row.
Davis, J. C. . . . . . Davis & Allen. . . . . Cotton Brokers, 40 Front Row.
Dow, H. . . . . H. Dow. . . . . Grocer, Exchange Building.
Dwight D. A. . . . . Dwight, Gill & Co. . . . . Proprietors of Chickasaw Cotton Press.
Dixon, L. V. . . . . Plant rs' Oil Works. . . . . Navy Yard.
Dorion, C. H. . . . . . Hill & Dorion. . . . . Cotton Factors, 18 Front Row.
Dickman, C. . . . . W. K. Hill & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors, 9 Front Row.
Dashiell, George. . . . . W. B. Miller & Co. . . . . Dry Goods, 187 Main street.
Donoho, W. B. . . . . Speed, Donoho & Strange. . . . . Dry Goods, 314 Main street.
Durr, L. M. . . . . L. M. Durr. . . . . Cotton Brokers, 18 Front Row.
Dashiell, E. . . . . Parker & Dashiell. . . . . Cotton Factors, 60 Front Row.
Davidson, E. G. . . . E. G. Davidson & Co. . . . . Bakers and Flour Dealers, opposite Jefferson Block.
Elliott, J. D. . . . . . Elliott & Co. . . . . Grain and Produce Dealers, Batture.
Elliott, William. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . do. . . . .
Elder, James. . . . . James Elder. . . . . Cotton Factor, corner Madison street and Front Row.
Elliott, Joseph. . . . . Elliot & Atwood. . . . . Grain Delers, 4 Exchange Building.
Edmonds, A. N. . . . . Edmonds, Todd & Co. . . . . Cotton and Tobacco Factors, 46 Front Row.
Estes, Z. N. . . . . Morton, Estes & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors, corner Monroe street and Front Row.
Edmondson, J. M. . . . . J. W. Armstrong & Co. . . . . Saddle and Harness Manufacturers, 247 Main street.
Erskine, Jno. . . . . J. Erksine . . . . . Commission Merchant, Adams Building.
Elliott, N. D. . . . . Elliott & Vinson. . . . . Commission Merchants, Batture.
Ford, Newton. . . . . F. Lane & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors, 3 Union street.
Falls G. . . . . Falls & Cash. . . . . Cotton Brokers, 72 Front Row.
Farrington, W. M. . . . . . Farrington, Howell & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors and Grocers, 16 Front Row.
Fowlkes, S. . . . . Fowlkes & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors and Grocers, Jefferson street.
Fowlkes, T. Jeff. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . do. . . . . do
Flournoy, J. G. . . . . Flournoy & Crawford. . . . . Grocers, 11 Front Row.
J Farrington, M. J. . . . . Farrington & Freeman. . . . . Slave Dealers, Shelby street.
Frank, J. F. . . . . J. F. Frank. . . . . Grocer, 35 Front Row.
Fenton, Benjamin. . . . . Memphis Oil Works. . . . . Navy Yard.
Fitzgerald, H. . . . . H. Fitzgerald & Co. . . . . Grocers, 44 Front Row.
Fisk, F. B. . . . . . F. B. Fisk. . . . . Cotton Broker, 18 Front Row.
Foote, H. L. . . . . Laflins, Smith & Boies. . . . . Powder Dealers, Front Row.
Fisher J. S. . . . . Fisher, Whyers & Co. . . . . Produce and commission Merchants, Bradley Block.
Finnie, T. J. . . . . T. J. Finnie. . . . . Attorney at Law, Turley Building.
Flaherty, James. . . . . J. & M. Flaherty. . . . . Furniture Dealers, Union street.
Foster, T. J. . . . . . Foster & Alexander. . . . . Boot and Shoe Dealers, 351 Main street.
Foute, A. M. . . . . . Gayoso Savings Institution. . . . . Madison street.
Frankland, A. E. . . . . . A. S. Levy & Co. . . . . Auctioneers, 186 Main street.
Ford, Charles. . . . . Frank Smith & Co. . . . . Produce Dealers, Bradley Block.
Ficklen, C. L. . . . . C. L. Ficklen. . . . . Commission Merchant, 5 Howard's Row.
Freligh, J. H. . . . . . Hutton & Freligh. . . . . Printers and Publishers, Second street.
Fightmaster, Wm. . . . . M rrison & Co. . . . . Commission Merchants, 5 Howard's Row.
Ferguson, W. W. . . . . McCombs & Co. . . . . Hardware Dealers, corner Main and Madison streets.
Gates S. M. . . . . . Gates & Wood. . . . . Cotton Factors and Grocers, 5 Monroe street.
Gill, G. M. . . . . Dwight Gill & Co. . . . . Proprietors of Chickasaw Cotton Press.
Guthrie C. R. . . . . . . Bayliss & Guthrie. . . . . Cotton Brokers, 10 Madison street.
Gibson, A. D. . . . . with Bowles & Co. . . . . Cotton Brokers, De Soto Bock.
Goodwyn, W.A. . . . . W.A. Goodwyn. . . . . Cotton Broker, 44 Front Row.
Gilmer, William. . . . . Gilmer & Co. . . . . Cotton F ctors, 6 Madison street.
Goodlett, W. H. . . . . . Goodlett & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors, 36 Front Row.
Goodlett, R. D. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . do
Graham, B. . . . . B. Graham. . . . . Cotton Factor and Grocer, Jackson Block.
Goyer, William. . . . . Goyer & Neely. . . . . Grocers, 6 Front Row.
Galloway, L. G. . . . . L. G. Galloway. . . . . Planter, Shelby County.
Galbreath, W. B. . . . . Meacham & Galbreath. . . . . Grocers, 6 Front Row.
Goyer, C.W. . . . . Todd & Goyer. . . . . Grocers. . . . . 72 Front Row.
Griffing, J. C. . . . . J. C. Griming. . . . . Commission Merchant, 46 Front Row.


Page 35

        
NAMES OF MEMBERS. STYLE OF FIRM. STYLE OF BUSINESS AND LOCATION.
Glisson, R.H. . . . . Andrews & Glisson. . . . . Grocers, 154 Main street.
Green, W. F. . . . . W. F. Green & Co. . . . . Chelsea Mills, Chelsea.
Grider, W. H. . . . . . H. H. Horton & Co. . . . . Commission Merchants, 60 Front Row.
Gridley, M. . . . . Gridley & Partee. . . . . Cotton Factors and Commission Merchants, 5 Monroe street.
Hunt, T. W. . . . . Harris, Hunt & Co. . . . . Cotton Brokers, 72 Front Row.
Harris, A. O. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . do. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . do
Hill, I. M. . . . . . Cassitt, Hill & Co. . . . . Wholesale Dry Goods, Main street.
Hawley, R. B. . . . . R. B. Hawley. . . . . Grocer, 47 Front Row.
Hiner, H. . . . . El her Whyers & Co. . . . . Produce and Commission Merchants, Bradley Block.
Hill, J. P. . . . . . J. P. Hill. . . . . Cotton F ctor , 47 Front Row.
Hill, N. . . . . Hill & Dorion. . . . . Cotton Factors, 18 Front Row.
Horton, W. H. . . . . Horton, Estes & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors, corner Front Row and Monroe street.
Hill, W. K. . . . . . W. K. Hill & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors, 9 Front Row.
Hough, R. . . . . R. Hough. . . . . Superintendent Mississippi and Tennessee Railroad.
Harmstad, L. . . . . L. Harmstad. . . . . Steamboat Agent, corner Front Row and Madison street.
Haile, C. H. . . . . . C. H. Haile. . . . . Cashier of Bank of Tennessee.
Hancock, S. D. Dwight, . . . . . Gill & Co. . . . . Cotton Broker, 18 Front Row.
Huls, G. F. . . . . . G. F Huls. . . . . Produce Dealer.
Hutton, W. M. . . . . . Hutton & Freligh. . . . . Printers and Publishers, Second street.
Hubbell, J. H. . . . . Hubbell, Hurd & Huston. . . . . Grain and Flour Merchants, Webster Block.
Huston, W. B. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . do. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . do. . . . . do. . . . . do
Howard, W. . . . . Howard & Son. . . . . Cotton Factors and Grocers, Howard's Row.
Howard, Thos. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . do. . . . . do
Halstead, J. . . . . Moore, Halstead & Co. . . . . Planing Mill, Second street.
Hodges, Asa. . . . . Puckett, Hodges & Ward. . . . . Cotton Factors, 18 Front Row.
Hays W. D. . . . . Simpson, Hays & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors, 40 Front Row.
Hendrix, S. B. . . . . Burnett, Hendrix & Walker. . . . . Grocers and Commission Merchants, 165 Main street.
Howell, S. B. . . . . . Farrington, Howell & Co. . . . . Grocers and Cotton Factors, 16 Front Row.
Hartley, J. H. . . . . J. H. Hartley. . . . . Family Grocer, corner Linden and De Soto streets.
Horton, H. H. . . . . H. H. Horton & Co. . . . . Commission Merchants, 60 Front Row.
Jones, R. S. . . . . Jones, Brown & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors, 180 Main street.
Jones, Charles. . . . . Charles Jones. . . . . Builder, Jefferson Block.
Jones, G. W. . . . . G. W. Jones & Co. . . . . Druggists, 303 Main street.
Jones, P. S. . . . . Shelton, Jones & Co. . . . . Cotton and Tobacco Factors, 40 Front Row.
Joiner, H. B. . . . . Kirkley & Co. . . . . Produce Dealers, Batture.
Judson, T. H. . . . . W. V. Allen & Co. . . . . Produce and Commission Merchants, 10 Madison street.
James, Thos. . . . . Thomas James. . . . . Coal Dealer, Batture.
Kirtland, I. B. . . . . I. B. Kirtland. . . . . Banker, Madison street.
Kimball, J. M. . . . . . Taber & Kimball. . . . . Cotton Brokers, 17 Madison street.
Keel, E. T. . . . . E. T. Keel. . . . . Grocer, 74 Front Row.
Kirk, John, Sr. . . . . . Kirk, Sr. . . . . Cotton Broker, 38 Front Row.
Kirkley, M. A. . . . . Kirkley& Co. . . . . Produce Dealers, Batture.
Kendig, T. A. . . . . Kendig & Co. . . . . Grocers, 38 Front Row.
Keen, W. J. . . . . W. J Keen. . . . . Commission Merchant, Clay Building.
King, M. C. . . . . Stewart & King. . . . . Cotton Factors, 49 Front Row.
Lane, F. . . . . . F. Lane & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors, 4 Union street.
Levy, A. S. . . . . A. S. Levy & Co. . . . . Auctioneers, 186 Main street.
Laird, Dr. J. W. . . . . Dr. H. Laird. . . . . Broker, Bank Building.
Leftwich, Dr. J. W. . . . . Leftwich & Co. . . . . Livery Stable, Jefferson street.
Lonsdale, J. G. . . . . J G. Lonsdale. . . . . Insurance Agent, corner Jefferson street and Front Row.
Leech, Tho. . . . . Thos. Leech & Co. . . . . Cotton Brokers, 33 Front Row.
Leech. J. B. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . Do. . . . . do
Lee, S. C. . . . . . Weatherford, Simpson & Co. . . . . Grocers and Commission Merchants, 88 Front Row.
Leigo, Wm. . . . . R. K. Becktel & Co. . . . . Family Grocers, 337 Main street.
McDavitt, E. . . . . . Stratton, McDavitt & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors and Commission Merchants, Jefferson Block.
Miller, W. B. . . . . W.B. Miller & Co. . . . . Dry Goods, 187 Main street.
Mosby, S. . . . . S Mosby & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors, 18 Front Row.
Murphy, J. J. . . . . J. J. Murphy. . . . . Grocer--38 Front Row.
Merrill, A. P. . . . . Dr A. P. Merrill. . . . . . Physician--residence 65 Madison street.
Mitchell, M. R. . . . . Sample, Mitchell & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors, 17 Madison street.
May, Ben. . . . . Ben May. . . . . Cashier of Bank of West Tennessee.
Morgan, S. T. . . . . S. T. Morgan. . . . . Cotton Broker, 60 Front row.
Molley, D. B. . . . . . D. B. Molloy & Co. . . . . Bankers, Madison street.
Mason, C. . . . . Mason & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors, Brinkley Block.
Mason, W.F. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . Do. . . . . Do. . . . . do
Mageveney, M. . . . . M. Mageveney. . . . . Real Estate--residence Market Street.
Martin, John. . . . . John Martin. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . Shelby street.
Mansfield, S . . . . . S. Mansfield & Co. . . . . Druggists corner of Main and Adams streets.
Mette, H. H. . . . . H. H. Mette. . . . . Liquor Rectifier, Exchange Building.
Morrison, J. W. . . . . . Morrison & Co. . . . . Commission Merchants, 5 Howard Row.
McClelland, W. R. . . . . . Ward & McClelland. . . . . Druggists, corner of Main and Adams streets.
McLean, Wm. . . . . Smith & McLean. . . . . Boat Stores, Batture.
Moore, W. R. . . . . Shepard & Moore. . . . . Wholesome Dry Goods, 305 Main street.
Morton, J. D. . . . . J. D. Morton & Co. . . . . Eclipse Wharfboat.
Mackall, T. F. . . . . Mackall, Brooks & Co. . . . . Grocers--Office 47 Front Row.
Meacham, M. L. . . . . Meacham & Galbreath. . . . . Grocers, 6 Front Row.


Page 36

        
NAMES OF MEMBERS. STYLE OF FIRM. STYLE OF BUSINESS AND LOCATION.
Moore, C. B. . . . . Moore, Halstead & Co. . . . . Planing Mill, Second below Union street.
McCombs J. M. . . . . . McCombs & Co. . . . . Hardware, corner of Main and Madison streets.
Munford, E. W. . . . . E. W. Munford. . . . . President of De Soto Insurance Company.
Moreland, J. S. . . . . Abbott & Dexter. . . . . Cotton Brokers, 38 Front Row.
Morgan, J. L. . . . . . Morgan & Baldwin. . . . . Architects, Walker Block.
Milam, W. W. . . . . B. D. Nabors & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors 47 Front Row.
Macrae, D. T. . . . . Porter & Macrae. . . . . Grocers, 18 Front Row.
Massey, E. D. . . . . . F. W. Rovster & Co. . . . . Dry Goods, corner of Main and Court streets.
McManus, J. C. . . . . . J. C. McManus. . . . . Steamboat owner, 38 Front Row.
Marshall, J. P. . . . . . Bridges, Marshall & Polk. . . . . Cotton Factors, 78 Front Row.
Nelson, T. A. . . . . Walker, Nelson & Co. . . . Cotton Factors, 8 Jefferson street.
Nelson, S. O. . . . . Do. . . . . Com. Mer'ts, New Orleans.
Neely, J. C. . . . . . Goyer & Neely. . . . . Grocers, 37 Front Row.
Nabers, B. D. . . . . B. D. Nabers & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors, 47 Front Row.
Norment T. B. . . . . . Norment, Wilson & Carter. . . . . Cotton Factors, corner of Main and Madison streets.
Nelson, W. A. . . . . Nelson & Boyce. . . . . Grocers, Trigg Building.
Norvell, L. C. . . . . . L. C. Norvell. . . . . Cotton Factor, 72 Front Row.
Orgill, Edmund. . . . . Orgill Bros. & Co. . . . . Hardware, l2 and 14 Front Row.
Orgill, Wm. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . DO. . . . . do
Parker, R. A., Sr. . . . . R. A. Parker & Son. . . . . . Cotton Factors, 6 Howard's Row.
Parker, R. A., Jr. . . . . Do. . . . . Do. . . . . do
Pickett, W. S. . . . . Pickett, Wormeley & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors and Grocers, 8 Front Row.
Patrick, J. M. . . . . J. M. Patrick & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors, 18 Front Row.
Pope, John. . . . . . John Pope. . . . . Planter, Shelby County.
Priest, W. G. . . . . . J. D. Morton & Co. . . . . Eclipse Wharfboat.
Prescott, J. P. . . . . J. P. Prescott & Co. . . . . Soap and Candle Manufacturers, Jefferson street.
Prescott, O. . . . . Do. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . .
Puckett, Richard. . . . . Puckett, Hodges & Ward. . . . . Cotton Factors, 18 Front Row.
Phillips, Ch. . . . . . with Gayes & Wood. . . . . . Grocers, 5 Monroe street.
Porter, J. T. . . . . Porter & Macrae. . . . . Grocers, 18 Front Row.
Philler, Geo. . . . . Geo. Philler. . . . . Hides and Leather , Batture.
Packer, H. B. . . . . . H. B. Packer. . . . . Coal Dealer, Batture.
Potter, Chas. . . . . Chas. Potter. . . . . Grocer--Office 38 Front Row.
Page, J. W., Jr. . . . . . J. W. Page, Jr. . . . . Banker, corner of Jefferson and Front Row.
Park , Wm. . . . . . Wm. Park & Co. . . . . Hardware 334 and 306 Main street.
Priddy, H. L. . . . . Priddy & Brower. . . . Proprietors of Argus, Second street.
Partee, C. C. . . . . . Vernon, Partee & Clay. . . . . Cotton Factors, 5 Front Row.
Proudfit, W. P. . . . . Day & Proudfit. . . . . Cotton Factors and Grocers, 33 Front Row.
Pickett, W. H. . . . . Wiggs Bros. & Co. . . . . Druggists, 208 Main street.
Peres, Jacob J. . . . . J. J. Peres & Co. . . . . Provision Dealers, 69 Main street.
Polk. C. P. . . . . Bridges, Marshall & Polk. . . . . Cotton Fac ors, 76 Front Row.
Partee, R. D. . . . . Gridley & Partee. . . . . Cotton Factors and Commission Merchants, 5 Monroe street.
Quinby, W. T. . . . . . Quinby & Robinson. . . . . Western Foundry, Batture.
Robinson, Wm. . . . . Quinby & Robinson. . . . . Western Foundry, Batture.
Royster, F. W. . . . . F. W. Royster & Co. . . . . Dry Goods, corner of Main and Court streets.
Risk, E. F. . . . . F. Risk. . . . . Stoves and Tinware, Provine Block.
Richardson, O. G. . . . . . R chardson, Snow & Co. . . . . Produce Dealers, Ferry Wharf.
Richards, F. S. . . . . F. S. Richards. . . . . Auditor Mississippi and Tennessee Railroad Company.
Rawlings, J J. . . . . J. J. Rawlings & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors, Brinkley Block.
Ross, W. B. . . . . W. B. Ross. . . . . President Hernando Insurance Company, Jefferson street.
Radcliff, F. E. . . . . F. E. Radcliff. . . . . Agent St ne Pipe Company, Second street.
Reid, S. P. . . . . Stration, McDavitt & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors, Jefferson Block.
Rose, E. M. . . . . Williams, Ross & Co. . . . . Grocers, 171 Main street.
Smith, Frank. . . . . Frank Smith & Co. . . . . Flour and Provisions, Bradley Block.
Stratton, J. T. . . . . Stratton, McDavitt & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors and Commission Merchants, Jefferson Block.
Street, Anthony. . . . . Street, Hungerford & Co. . . . . Foundry, Navy Yard.
Strange, J. P. . . . . Speed, Donoho & Strange. . . . . Dry Goods, 314 Main street.
Speed, J. H. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . Do. . . . . do
Stambrough, S. A. . . . . W. F. Green & Co. . . . . Chelsea Mills, Chelsea.
Scarbrorgh, A. M. . . . . . Bryan & Scarbrorgh. . . . . Cotton Factors, 65 Front Row.
Solden, C. J.. . . . . Gayoso Savings Institution. . . . . Bankers, Madison street.
Sharpe, J. B. . . . . J. B. Sharpe & Co. . . . . Tobacco Dealers, corner of Front Row and Monroe street.
Strode, Geo. W. . . . . J. D. Morton & Co. . . . . Eclipse Wharfboat.
Smither, Gabriel. . . . .G. Smither. . . . . Cotton Broker, Bank Avenue.
Steele, Jas. . . . . J. Steele & Co. . . . . Grocers, Exchange Building.
Shelton, Asa. . . . . Shelton, Jones & Co. . . . . Cotton and Tobacco Factors, 40 Front Row.
Skipwith, R. . . . . . R. Skipwith. . . . . Cotton Broker, Bank Avenue.
Saffarrans, J. S. . . . . Saffarans & Stratton. . . . . Stoves and Tinware, 4 and 6 Monroe street.
Stratton, W. H. . . . . Do. . . . . Do. . . . . do
Sevier, John. . . . . John Sevier. . . . . Cotton Factor, 45 Front Row.
Simpson, J. G. . . . . . Weatherford, Simpson & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors, 17 Madison Street.
Sample, J. A. . . . . . Sample, Mitchell, & Co. . . . . Grocers, 88 Front Row.
Sample, J. M. . . . . Do. . . . . Do. . . . . do
Smith, F. W. . . . . F. W. Smith. . . . . Cashier Union Bank.


Page 37

        
NAMES OF MEMBERS. STYLE OF FIRM. STYLE OF BUSINESS AND LOCATION.
Simpson, W. S. . . . . . Simpson, Hays & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors, 40 Front Row.
Sanders, T. A. . . . . Do. . . . . Do. . . . . do
Shephard, J. H. . . . . Shepherd & Moore. . . . . Wholesale Dry Goods, 305 Main street.
Shephard D. A. . . . . D. A. Shepherd. . . . . Cashier Planters' Bank.
Smith, J. J. . . . . Smith & McLean. . . . . Boat Stores and Provisions, Batture.
Stow, L. F. . . . . Stow & Pugh. . . . . Grocers 40 Front Row.
Smith, L. . . . . L. Smith. . . . . Cotton Broker
Smith, H. G. . . . . H. G. Smith. . . . . Attorney at Law, Court street.
Smith, John. . . . . Wm. Park & Co. . . . . Hardware, 304 and 306 Main street.
Semmes, B. J. . . . . B. J. Semmes. . . . . Wines and Liquors, 90 Front Row.
Stewart, W. L. . . . . Stewart & King. . . . . Cotton Factors, 49 Front Row.
Seessel, A. . . . . A. Seessel. . . . . Dry Goods, 233 Main street.
Smithwick, A. A. . . . . A. A. Smithwick & Co. . . . . Commission Merchants, Union Block.
Shelby, John. . . . . J. Shelby & Co. . . . . Grocers and Commission erchants, 102 Front Row.
Saffarrans, J. L. . . . . J. L. Saffarrans. . . . . Contractor.
Tate, Sam. . . . . Sam Tate. . . . . President Memphis and Charleston Railroad Company.
Titus, F. . . . . F. Titus & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors, Jefferson street.
Todd, J. W. . . . . Todd & Gayer. . . . . Grocers, 72 Front Row.
Todd, J. W. . . . . Edmonds, Todd & Co. . . . . Cotton and Tobacco Factors, 46 Front Row.
Treadwell, A. C. . . . . F. Lane & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors, 2 Union street.
Taylor, J. H. . . . . W. B. Miller & Co. . . . . Dry Goods, 197 Main street.
Taylor, W. F. . . . . Do. . . . . Do. . . . . do
Taylor, C. H. . . . . . Stocks & Taylor. . . . . Produce Dealers, Bradley Block.
Townsend, D. H. . . . . . D. H. Townsend. . . . . Cotton Factor and Grocer, 46 Front Row.
Tomeny, J. M. . . . . J. M. Tomeny. . . . . Secretary and Treasurer Memphis and Ohio Railroad.
Toof, J. S. . . . . J. S. Toof. . . . . Secretary Chamber of Commerce.
Torian, J. . . . . Kirwin & Torian. . . . . Navy Mills, Navy Yard.
Trout, Thos. . . . . Trout & Son. . . . . Cotton Brokers, 2 Shelby Street.
Trout, W. W. . . . . Do. . . . . Do. . . . . do
Taylor, S. A. . . . . Huls, Cromwell & Taylor. . . . . Produce Dealers, 96 Front Row.
Trader, D. C. . . . . D. C. Trader. . . . . Insurance Agent, Stillman & Breen's Building.
Verser, J. L. . . . . . J. L. Verser. . . . . Cotton Factor, 18 Front Row.
Vernon, S. W. . . . . Vernon, Partee & Clay. . . . . Cotton Factors, 4 Front Row.
Vaccaro, A. . . . . . Vaccaro & Co. . . . . Grocers, 7 Front Row.
Vaccaro, A. B. . . . . Do. . . . . Do. . . . . do
Vinson, F. M. . . . . Elliott & Vinson. . . . . Commission Merchants, Batture
Williamson, S. B., Sr. . . . . S. B. Williamson. . . . . Grocer, 19 Front Row.
Williamson, S. B., Jr. . . . . Do. . . . Do. . . . . do
Woodruff, A. . . . . A. Woodruff & Co. . . . . Carriage Manufacturers, Woodruff Block.
Worsham J. J. . . . . J. J. Worsham. . . . . Late Proprietor of Worsham House.
Wiggs, W. B. . . . . Wiggs Bros & Co. . . . . Druggists , 298 Main street.
Wiggs J. J. . . . . Do. . . . . Do. . . . . do
Williams, T. H. . . . . T. H. Williams & Co. . . . . Commission Merc'ts and Steamboat Ag'ts, 3 Howard's Row.
Walt, R. P. . . . . R. P. Walt & Co. . . . . Provision and Produce Merchants, Bradley Block
Walt, Martin. . . . . Do. . . . . Do. . . . . do
Witherspoon, A. D. . . . . A. D. Witherspoon. . . . . Cotton Broker, Madison street.
West, H. C. . . . . West, Cochran & Co. . . . . Produce and Commission Merchants, 70 Front Row.
Walker, H. C. . . . . Walker, Nelson & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors, 8 Jefferson street.
Ward, R. I. . . . . Ward & McClelland. . . . . Druggists, corner Main and Adams streets.
Watson, J. W. . . . . J. W. Watson & Co. . . . . Plumbers, 2 Monroe street.
Wilson, T. R. . . . . . T. R. Wilson. . . . . Commission Merchant, 40 Front Row.
Webb, S. M. . . . . S. M. Webb & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors, 7 Front Row.
Webb, R. C. . . . . Do. . . . . Do. . . . . do
Weatherford, H. M. . . . . Weatherford, Simpson & Co. . . . . Plumbers, 2 Monroe street.
West, Wm. . . . . Do. . . . . Do. . . . . do
Woolworth, J. . . . . Fitzgerald & Co. . . . . Grocers, 44 Front Row.
Walker, Samuel. . . . . Burnett, Hendrix & Walker. . . . . Grocers, 165 Main street.
Wible, J. W. . . . . J. Boro & Co. . . . . Grocers, 43 Front Row.
Whyers, E. G. . . . . Fisher, Whyers & Co. . . . . Produce and Commsision Merchants, Bradley Block.
Wood, A. M. . . . . Gates & Wood. . . . . Cotton Factors and Grocers, 5 Monroe street.
White, G . C. . . . . Gilmer & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors, 4 Madison street.
Wilson, S. A. . . . . Norment, Wilson & Carter. . . . . Cotton Factors, corner of Main and Madison streets.
Ward, J. J. . . . . Puckett, Hodges & Ward. . . . . Cotton Factors, 18 Front Row.
Wilder, T. D. . . . . Orgill Bros. & Co. . . . . Hardware, 12 and 14 Front Row.
Wilkinson, T. W. . . . . T. W. Wilkinson. . . . . Insurance Agent, Bank Building.
Williams, J. S. . . . . Williams, Ross & Co. . . . . Grocers, 171 Main street.
Winchester, George. . . . . Geo. Winchester. . . . . Secretary DeSoto Insurance Company.
Wardlaw J. N. . . . . Davie & Wardlaw. . . . . Cotton Factors, 18 Front Row.
Winfield, J. L. Sr. . . . . Far ington, Howell & Co. . . . . Cotton Factors and Grocers, 17 Front Row.
Waddell, B. B. . . . . B. B. & V. B. Waddell. . . . . Attorneys at Law, Court street.
Walker, William. . . . . William Walker & Co. . . . . Eagle Mills, corner Chickasaw and Auction streets.
Warren, A. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . do. . . . . Do. . . . . do. . . . . do. . . . . do