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North Carolina Emergency Relief Administration, J. S. Kirk (Jacob Sydney), 1909-, edited by, Walter A. Cutter (Walter Alrey), 1902-, edited by, and Thomas W. Morse, edited by
Emergency Relief in North Carolina. A Record of the Development and the Activities of the North Carolina Emergency Relief Administration, 1932-1935. North Carolina Emergency Relief Commission, State Administrator, Mrs. Thomas O'Berry. Edited by J.S. Kirk, Walter A. Cutter [and] Thomas W. Morse.
[Raleigh]: [Edwards & Broughton], 1936.

See special descriptive matter referring to these Illustrations on page 141.
[Appeared on page 141 in original.](1) Home of a typical Rural Rehabilitation family, Alexander County. (2) Children of this Rural Rehabilitation family, Alexander County. (3) House built for Relief Family, Brunswick County. (4) The home of a Relief family in Iredell County. This house was built during the winter months of 1934. Through field work the mother secured $20 with which she purchased a one-acre tract of land. A neighbor offered her the logs in a near-by house which had fallen down. She and her son, with the help of some neighbors, put these logs together, making a one-room cabin. There was nothing with which to chink the cracks, and late November found the family with no chimney and no way to keep out the cold winter air. The mother then agreed to pick 2,000 pounds of cotton for a neighbor if he would give her the brick in a chimney left in his field from a building that had burned there several years before. She and her children took this chimney down and carried the brick about a mile to their cabin. It was then that the Relief Administration, together with the County Welfare Department, gave her assistance in building the chimney and boarding up the inside of the cabin. Eleven persons live in this one room. (5) Rural Rehabilitation client, Craven County. This family purchased one acre of land and constructed the house from farm income under the Rural Rehabilitation Program of 1934. (6) Alexander County. The head of this family worked under the CWA program, saved his money and bought a small tract of land on which there was a tobacco barn. With the aid of his wife and children he gathered field stones and built a chimney, then added a room and porch, in this way converting the barn into a livable home. The owner and his family are delighted to have had an opportunity to acquire a home and are planning through the Rural Rehabilitation Program to buy necessary stock and equipment so that they may become self-supporting. (7) Rural Rehabilitation family, Rutherford County. This family built the cabin themselves, out of slabs. The land had no house on it. (8) Relief family, Iredell County. This is an illustration of the need for relief. The family is tragically poor. The father does not have either the willingness or the intelligence to provide for the family. There was one bed for the entire family. A pile of cotton in one corner of the room furnished the bed and covering for part of the family. Food was prepared on the hearth, for there was no cook stove. A "hoe-cake" was broken into bits and handed to members of the family, since there was no table at which the family could sit, and there were no dishes from which food could be served.

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